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this is normally seen in a typical SSL certificate. For the modulus, I know that it is represented in hexadecimal form, but why is there a semicolon (:) after every group of 2 digits?

Public-Key: (2048 bit) Modulus:
00:bf:e7:7c:28:1d:c8:78:a7:13:1f:cd:2b:f7:63:
2c:89:0a:74:ab:62:c9:1d:7c:62:eb:e8:fc:51:89:
b3:45:0e:a4:fa:b6:06:de:b3:24:c0:da:43:44:16:
e5:21:cd:20:f0:58:34:2a:12:f9:89:62:75:e0:55:
8c:6f:2b:0f:44:c2:06:6c:4c:93:cc:6f:98:e4:4e:
3a:79:d9:91:87:45:cd:85:8c:33:7f:51:83:39:a6:
9a:60:98:e5:4a:85:c1:d1:27:bb:1e:b2:b4:e3:86:
a3:21:cc:4c:36:08:96:90:cb:f4:7e:01:12:16:25:
90:f2:4d:e4:11:7d:13:17:44:cb:3e:49:4a:f8:a9:
a0:72:fc:4a:58:0b:66:a0:27:e0:84:eb:3e:f3:5d:
5f:b4:86:1e:d2:42:a3:0e:96:7c:75:43:6a:34:3d:
6b:96:4d:ca:f0:de:f2:bf:5c:ac:f6:41:f5:e5:bc:
fc:95:ee:b1:f9:c1:a8:6c:82:3a:dd:60:ba:24:a1:
eb:32:54:f7:20:51:e7:c0:95:c2:ed:56:c8:03:31:
96:c1:b6:6f:b7:4e:c4:18:8f:50:6a:86:1b:a5:99:
d9:3f:ad:41:00:d4:2b:e4:e7:39:08:55:7a:ff:08:
30:9e:df:9d:65:e5:0d:13:5c:8d:a6:f8:82:0c:61:
c8:6b
Exponent: 65537 (0x10001)
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closed as off-topic by e-sushi, DrLecter, owlstead, otus, mikeazo Jun 27 at 11:45

  • This question does not appear to be about cryptography within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is not about cryptography as defined in our help center. –  e-sushi Jun 26 at 20:20

1 Answer 1

To make it easier for humans to read.

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This is comment, but not an answer. Let’s be honest: is this the outcome when you Write to the best of your ability, as explained in our help center? To turn this comment into an actual answer, you should – at least – add a link to the reference/paper where this formatting is defined, and quote the relevant part of that reference/paper. –  e-sushi Jun 26 at 20:35

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