A birthday attack is a cryptanalytic technique. Birthday attacks can be used to find collisions in a cryptographic hash function. For instance, suppose we have a hash function which, when supplied with a random input, returns one of $k$ equally likely values. By repeatedly evaluating the function on ...

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What are the differences between collision attack and birthday attack?

From my understanding both types of attack, collision and birthday, are based on the principle of two randomly/pseudo-randomly chosen plaintext to hash to the same value. I don't want to launch any ...
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Practical brute-force attack on 128 bit encryption

In brute-force attack calculations cryptographers say we should assume an attacker will find the key after $2^{(n/2)}$ tries. If n=128, then n/2=64. We know that this is practical (A 64 bit key is ...
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How much work is required to detect multiple collisions for a hash function?

Assume an ideal hash function of output size n bits, detecting one collision requires approximately 2^(n/2) evaluations of the ...
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N way collision of hashes

For a collision $H(A_1) = H(A_2)$, the number of queries is $T^{1/2}$ where $\log_2(T)$ is length of hash output. Then, what would be the number of queries requried to find an $n$-collision ($H(A_1) = ...
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CMAC vs HMAC security strength

From the perspective of a Birthday Paradox attack, isn't it true that CMAC based on AES-128 is weaker than HMAC-SHA-1? The attack on CMAC-AES-128 requires about $2^{64}$ operations whereas the same ...
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No Birthday Attack to TCR

I'm reading the paper “Collision-Resistant Hashing? Towards Making UOWHFs Practical” , which compared TCR (Target Collision Resistant) and ACR (Any collision Resistant). It says we wish to stress ...
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Three-way hash collision

According to the birthday paradox we need approximately $O(|T|^{1/2})$ samples from the tag-space to find a collision for a hash function $h:K\times M \to T$. But how many samples are needed to find a ...
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Birthday Attack

I am reading the birthday attack in wikipedia. We consider the following experiment. From a set of $H$ values we choose $n$ values uniformly at random thereby allowing repetitions. Let $p(n; ...
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How does a birthday attack on a hashing algorithm work?

A "normal", brute-force attack on a cryptographic hashing algorithm $H$ should have a complexity of about $2^{n}$ for a hash algorithm with an output length of $n$ bits. That means it takes about ...
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Why would you expect to find a collision in a hash function after approximately $\sqrt{n}$ hashes?

I can't get an intuitive understanding of why it's $2^{(\frac{n}{2})}$ and not $2^n$, where $n$ is the number of bits of which the key consists.
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Security of N bit HMAC

Lets say that I am using 128 bit HMAC. How many operations are needed to find a "non secure" message. Is a birthday attack possible?