1
vote
1answer
88 views

Importance of salt when deriving an encryption key

I'm very curious to know this and a bit confuses too: Suppose, I have two files encrypted using AES-128bit with keys PBKDF2-derived from the same password and the same salt. If an attacker does ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

Is 80 bits of key size considered safe against brute force attacks?

I came across KATAN Family of Ciphers for small domain input blocks . They cipher arbitrary block lengths 32,48,64 but their key size 80 bits only. Is 80 bits of key size considered safe with ...
4
votes
1answer
421 views

Can cryptocurrency mining devices be used for cryptanalysis?

In the past year or so we have seen production of ASIC devices designed for mining of cryptocurrencies. These devices can perform SHA256 hashing at rates much higher than was seen in the past and are ...
5
votes
4answers
243 views

Is there a proof for showing any cryptogram is crackable?

I commonly hear statements along the lines of "all cryptograms are crackable - it's only a matter of time". Is there a proof to show that any cryptogram is "crackable"? The proof may be of a more ...
3
votes
2answers
133 views

Is there a name for this 'enhanced' caeser shift and if so, is it trivial to break?

This cipher shifts the letter that it will shift to, after each shift... I used to play with this when I was a kid. I was thinking about it recently and realized that it wasn't as simple as I ...
2
votes
2answers
185 views

Hypothetical unknown cipher - security in obscurity?

I'm curious what would happen in the following scenario: Suppose an attacker gets a hold of a cipher-text of sufficiently large length. And suppose he has the means to verify a successful decryption. ...
4
votes
4answers
495 views

Decrypting files with an unknown method but a known result

I am assuming there is a very simple way of working this out by brute force, but I am not sure if there is a better way. I have a file of data that I wish to get (my data, generated by a machine). ...
4
votes
1answer
262 views

Question about why RSA is hard to attack

I think I understand why RSA is hard to attack but I'd like to get clarification if I actually do. Assume there are two people, Alice and Bob, who are attempting to communicate privately but that we ...
3
votes
3answers
278 views

How to encrypt data and know it will be secure for at least a few decades?

I want to encrypt a small amount (few kilobytes) of data and be fairly confident it will be secure against brute force decryption and advances in cryptanalysis for at least a a few decades (or more). ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

How much computing resource is required to brute-force RSA?

It's been over 30 years since Rivest, Shamir and Adleman first publicly described their algorithm for public-key cryptography; and the intelligence community is thought to have known about it for ...
1
vote
2answers
279 views

Brute force a ciphered message? [closed]

I wrote my own cipher to encrypt messages. I would like to test a sample ciphered message to see how strong it is. Are there any tools for such task either in Windows or Linux ?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

How can I do a brute force (ciphertext only) attack on an CBC-encrypted message?

Given a CBC ciphertext and IV, how can I find the encryption key? We are limited with an 8 chars key, each char in the range of [a..h], so I can generate every possible key (these are only $8^8 = ...
4
votes
2answers
335 views

Is it generally possible to employ brute force methods when the encryption scheme is not known? Why or why not?

Lets say you are presented with an encrypted string of bits or text, and no other information. What would be necessary before you could apply brute force methods to decrypting the string? How would a ...
2
votes
2answers
472 views

DES Crack simulation

I wish to simulate an implementation of a DES Cracker using verilog. But every paper I read give only abstract hints but no concrete steps or how really to go about it. How is it usually done? For ...
2
votes
1answer
987 views

Cryptanalysis Affine Cipher: Brute-Force Search Vs. Meet-in-the-middle

Affine Cipher: $Enc(x) = (ax + b) \mod m$ $Dec(x) = a^{-1}(x-b) \mod m$ For a brute-force key search, we need to do $a \cdot b$ encryptions in the worst case. For a meet-in-the-middle attack, how ...
7
votes
1answer
317 views

How exactly would someone attempt to analyse ciphertext produced by popular encryption products such as Truecrypt/PGP?

I am interested in understanding what the process would be if an attacker wished to attempt to decrypt data secured by common tools such as OpenPGP, Truecrypt or the like. Are there any documented ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Brute forcing CRC-32

I'm working on a cryptosystem which uses IDEA. The designer made the mistake of including a CRC-32B hash of the password unencrypted in the header, so that the system can quickly reject bad ...