6
votes
2answers
259 views

Is encrypting credit card numbers one by one with rsautl secure?

I wish to encrypt credit card numbers one by one using asymmetric encryption on the command line. My current approach is this… Encrypt: ...
3
votes
1answer
207 views

How difficult is it to brute force d in RSA: d = (1/e) mod φ in a CPT attack?

Given that RSA key generation works by computing: n = pq φ = (p-1)(q-1) d = (1/e) mod φ If I was an attacker who wanted to brute force d, could I brute force d given just the public key, the ...
2
votes
1answer
284 views

Textbook-RSA meet-in-the-middle attack against other RSA based schemes?

A “meet-in-the-middle” (not “man-in-the-middle”!) attack on textbook-RSA was presented to me. The only requirements for it was that the attacker gets the output of RSA and the public key, and that the ...
1
vote
1answer
830 views

How long to bruteforce a RSA key [duplicate]

Suppose I have a 2048 bit RSA public key, and want to brute force the corresponding private key. I guess there are 2048^16 possible combinations? How long would this take me to brute force with an ...
1
vote
1answer
156 views

chaining rsa with ecies

In an answer to a previous question it was suggested that one way to protect your asymmetrically encrypted AES-256 keys, from say a solution to prime factorization, would be to chain asymmetric ...
4
votes
1answer
241 views

Question about why RSA is hard to attack

I think I understand why RSA is hard to attack but I'd like to get clarification if I actually do. Assume there are two people, Alice and Bob, who are attempting to communicate privately but that we ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

How much computing resource is required to brute-force RSA?

It's been over 30 years since Rivest, Shamir and Adleman first publicly described their algorithm for public-key cryptography; and the intelligence community is thought to have known about it for ...