3
votes
1answer
651 views

Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange with Authentication: Man-in-the-Middle query

I have been reading up on MiTM attacks, and the prevention of them using public key certificates. Recently I learnt about Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange with Authentication, and how it uses signed ...
1
vote
1answer
202 views

What exactly is inside a private key?

May sound stupid to many, but I would like to have some pointers on what exactly is contained inside a private key. I have decent understanding of public/private keys/certificates (have created them ...
2
votes
2answers
912 views

What happens when a root CA has its private key compromised?

What happens when a root CA has its private key compromised? Then all children in the tree are compromised too? And then all certificates are compromised? What needs to happen then? Related: - How ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

I've got my private key compromised. How does CRL work?

How does certificate revocation list (CRL) work? How can I send a request to the CA to add my current private key to the CRL, so no one except me can add my certificate to the CRL? Related: - How can ...
1
vote
1answer
167 views

How can we get CA's public key?

To get a public key of some organization or someone we want to send an encrypted message to, we need to make a request to CA asking that organization's public key. CA then returns X509 certificate. It ...
1
vote
1answer
176 views

How do I sign data that's been encrypted using public key? (RSA)

I've received a public key to encrypt my data for the other end to decrypt using their private key. Now, they want us to sign the data as well to ensure non-repudiation. I thought that I should only ...
2
votes
2answers
454 views

Certificateless cryptography

While reading "Certificateless Public Key Cryptography" by Author Sattam S. Al-Riyami and Kenneth G. Paterson, they have considered generation of private keys by a Key Generation Center (KGC). If the ...
1
vote
1answer
211 views

Verification of identity by certification authority

I have question about how a user's identity is verified by a Certification Authority. As I understand it, the process works as follows: User generates his private key and (with the help of private ...
2
votes
0answers
198 views

Are any Certificate Authorities using 4096 bit keys for their intermediate and root certificates? [closed]

Are any Certificate Authorities using 4096 bit keys for their intermediate and root certificates? I know you can, of course, use a 4096 bit key for your server certificate, but I usually see 2048 bit ...
4
votes
2answers
175 views

Can S/MIME be still considered secure?

Previoulsy I had asked this question at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/18235983/can-s-mime-be-still-considered-secure but I feel this forum is topic-wise the right place. Recently there has been ...
0
votes
1answer
281 views

How does certificate-based encryption solve key revocation problem?

How does certificate-based encryption solve key revocation problem? For example, if a user accidentally reveals its secret key or an attacker compromises it, the user may request revocation of its ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Certificate == signed public key

For primes p and q used to create a keypair, I understand that the following operation is used to create a signature: $M^d (\bmod\ N)$ where d and N have their usual meanings and M is the message. ...
4
votes
1answer
373 views

Client and server using same SSL certificate - any issues?

I'm working on software where multiple components will communicate with each other using SSL. There would be one central component acting as a server, which would also require the clients to present ...
2
votes
1answer
314 views

Generate an insecure public / private key pair

I am looking for a way to generate an "insecure" public key pair. and by insecure I actually mean a pair that is breakable using brute-force (or other encryption) methods. As far as I know PGP ...
1
vote
1answer
996 views

How does a client verify a server certificate?

As far as I know, when I request a certificate from Verisign (for example), and after they approved that me is me, they create a certificate (for me) which contains the digital signature and public ...
4
votes
2answers
368 views

X.509 CSR: Why does CA remove signature?

I just read this article on Wikipedia: Certificate Signing Request I'm not a PKI or Crypto expert. As I understand, a CSR (certification request) is always signed by the PKCS#10-Request creator. ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does the PKCS1 RSA private key structure contain more than just exponent and modulus?

The ASN.1 spec for the PKCS1 RSA private key format is as follows: ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

How do other, non-RSA algorithms, compare to the PKCS #1 standard?

Arguably the PKCS suite of standards have a profit-oriented bias as they are promoted by RSA and promote their algorithms over others in the form of RFCs and other means. I'm considering the ...