The attacker can specify his own plain text and encrypt or sign it.

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11
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2answers
2k views

Is using a predictable IV with CFB mode safe or not?

While writing this answer, I noted that NIST SP 800-38A says that (emphasis mine): "For the CBC and CFB modes, the IVs must be unpredictable. In particular, for any given plaintext, it must not be ...
10
votes
4answers
11k views

What is the difference between known-plaintext attack and chosen-plaintext attack?

I am very confused between the concept of known-plaintext attack and chosen-plaintext attack. It seems to me that these two are the same thing, but it definitely is not. Can anyone explain to me how ...
5
votes
2answers
727 views

Practical necessity of semantic security under chosen plain text attack (CPA) in CBC mode

I was not able to understand why we practically need a CPA security in Cipher Block Chaining. (which insist on having a random IV), let say if the encryption is not CPA secure i.e , the adversary can ...
6
votes
2answers
6k views

How does a chosen plaintext attack on RSA work?

How can one run a chosen plaintext attack on RSA? If I can send some plaintexts and get the ciphertexts, how can I find a relation between them which helps me to crack another ciphertext?
1
vote
2answers
183 views

CPA distinguisher for matrix multiplication in GF(256) with randomized padding

What is the best CPA distinguisher for the function $F_k:\{0,1\}^{8n}\to\{0,1\}^{16n}$ described below? Let $E_k$ be a $2n\times2n$ matrix with elements in $GF(2^8)$, selected by generating bit ...
6
votes
1answer
324 views

Message space in security definitions

What is the message space in the following example and how does a message space relate to a security definition? I mean, what difference does it make to such a definition if your message space is ...
6
votes
2answers
411 views

For public-key encryption, why does COA resistance imply CPA resistance?

My professor told me: If a public-key crypto-system is secure against ciphertext-only attacks, then it is also secure against a chosen-plaintext attack. Why is this true? Is there a proof that ...
4
votes
2answers
735 views

What is the smallest plaintext/ciphertext size for an algorithm like?

When I read about a choosen plaintext attack, for example on AES the block size is always 128 bits, does it mean the attacker will only supply 128 bits data words as "plain text" ?