analysing cryptographic algorithms, potentially uncovering weaknesses in them (e.g. "breaking" them or casting doubts on their actual security)

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How do we prove that AES, DES etc. are secure?

How do we prove that AES, DES etc. are secure? I've read about them and know the basics on how they work, but I still don't quite understand how we can be sure they are secure? What are the proofs?
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1answer
206 views

What is adversary's advantage in cryptography and why we use it?

The definition of adversary's advantage seems a bit odd for me and I am wondering why do we use it to measure the power of an adversary rather than just use the probability of a PPT adversary ...
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3answers
2k views

Encryption/ciphers/codes in Chinese

I am quite curious as to how you can perform simple encryption for the Chinese language. Saw a similar question related to encryption/Chinese here: About cryptography in a character language, ...
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3answers
184 views

How to attack a fixed LCG with partial output?

To show some colleague programmers exactly how broken C's rand() is (at least on Windows) I decided to break it. So everyone knows the exact parameters, MSVC's ...
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0answers
86 views

Career advice for our readers [closed]

I am a first year math PhD student with work experience and an MS in math. Do you have any advice regarding internships involved with cryptography and other mathematics other than the NSA? Thanks.
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180 views

Is this a structural weakness of Feistel networks?

I'm doing a lot of reading about Feistel networks. Something occurred to me a bit ago that I hadn't realized previously, namely that in any Feistel construction there are bits of the plaintext that ...
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1answer
94 views

Is there any existing analysis for this construction to turn a tweakable blockcipher into a PRF?

I'm basically looking at this construction to turn a tweakable blockcipher $E_c(x)$ taking a key $k$, nonce $n$, counter $c$ (forming tweak $t = c||n$) and an input $x$ into a PRF on an ...
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1answer
268 views

Can a nested block cipher avoid the meet in the middle attack by using a secret initialization vector for the inner encryption?

It seems to be believed that encrypting twice with a block cipher using an independent key each time is not as secure as you might expect because of the "meet in the middle" attack. This is an attack ...
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930 views

Cryptanalysis Affine Cipher: Brute-Force Search Vs. Meet-in-the-middle

Affine Cipher: $Enc(x) = (ax + b) \mod m$ $Dec(x) = a^{-1}(x-b) \mod m$ For a brute-force key search, we need to do $a \cdot b$ encryptions in the worst case. For a meet-in-the-middle attack, how ...
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1answer
275 views

Break double encryption

Let $E_k$ : {0,1}$^l$ be a block cipher encryption function with block-size $l$ and key-length $n$. In class, we saw that a double encryption with two independent keys $E{}'_{k_1k_2}(x)$ = ...
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1answer
135 views

Can a PRNG with a fixed amount of entropy always be detected?

Given a fixed seed (i.e. no ongoing source on entropy), is there (practically or theoretically) any PRNG algorithm that can generate an infinite sequence of random numbers such that an observer cannot ...
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816 views

What NIST protocol was allegedly backdoored by NSA in 2006?

From a recent NY Times article: Cryptographers have long suspected that the agency planted vulnerabilities in a standard adopted in 2006 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology ...
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7answers
14k views

Taking advantage of one-time pad key reuse?

Suppose Alice wants to send encryptions (under a one-time pad) of $m_1$ and $m_2$ to Bob over a public channel. Alice and Bob have a shared key $k$; however, both messages are the same length as the ...
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5answers
3k views

How can we reason about the cryptographic capabilities of code-breaking agencies like the NSA or GCHQ?

I have read in Applied Cryptography that the NSA is the largest hardware buyer and the largest mathematician employer in the world. How can we reason about the symmetric ciphers cryptanalysis ...
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2answers
132 views

Feedback requested on a method of posting a message without revealing the author

So I was thinking about variations on the Dining Cryptographers problem - In some cases, it's useful to be able to post a message without revealing the source, but with the additional constraint of ...
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6answers
323 views

Do ciphertexts leak information about their algorithmic creators?

If an adversary holds thousands of encrypted files that were encrypted with the same cipher, can he determine which cipher method had been used on the files? Assume that the adversary has no prior ...
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243 views

Quadratic residue problem on composite integers

Its believed that the quadratic residue modulo $n=p·q$ for large primes $p$ and $q$ is intractable, which forms the basis of some cryptosystems. However, it is solvable if the factors of $n$ are ...
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239 views

Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?

I know it's a highly theoretical topic, but I was wondering if there was any research out there about what cryptography would be like assuming that we had access to nondeterministic Turing machines. ...
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480 views

Any practical uses of machine learning for cryptography?

I am about to go study for my masters in machine learning, data mining and high performance computing, but have recently become very interested in cryptography after taking Dan Boneh's Cryptography ...
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289 views

Cryptographic Symmetric Stream Cipher

Let me know a cryptographic symmetric stream cipher system with only two functions say S() and P() and it should satisfy the ...
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2answers
448 views

why DES uses exactly 16 rounds?

Why DES uses 16 rounds why not more or less then 16. what is the significant of using 16.
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2answers
421 views

Cryptanalysis of S-DES - Equations

I am trying to derive equations for s and t in the cryptanalysis of a Simple DES algorithm, but I haven't been able to deduce ...
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2answers
1k views

Decrypting DES with decrypted and encrypted data

I got two 8-byte strings. One which is decrypted is: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF and one which is encrypted is: ...
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232 views

How secure would this code be against cryptanalysis?

Simple version: Create software that takes a database of the dictionary, alphabet, and phrases. Randomly generate a database of random strings of letters/numbers/symbols of varying length. Randomly ...
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4answers
802 views

Is Wiener's attack on RSA extendable to larger keys with low hamming weight?

Using small private exponents with RSA improves performance. However, it has been shown (Wiener, 1990) that if $\log d \leq \frac14 \log N$, the private exponent $d$ can be reconstructed from the ...
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1answer
339 views

Can two cipher letters per plaintext letter easily defeat character frequency analysis?

For a class 5 years ago I wrote a paper about "defeating character frequency analysis by using two cipher letters per plaintext letter" ...
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105 views

Jumblar: Using map locations as passwords

I had the idea of converting map locations into passwords. Basically Jumblar takes a hash of the user's location and stores this as a comment on the PGP network. The 'stored-hash'(Vague-Hash) ...
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2answers
151 views

Why is it said that if we have a duplicate ciphertext block it can leak our information?

I have been recently going through a question: http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/15767/what-do-key-size-and-block-size-mean-in-cryptography and it created in me a series of doubts. Referring ...
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339 views

why public key cryptography (RSA) is use in sites like Google, facebook (what is the need to ecode data in these sites)?

The RSA algorithm is used for encryption (plain text to cipher text) and decryption (cipher text to plain text) of data. What is the need for using public keys in these sites; why is data is encrypted ...
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1answer
216 views

How to prove a cipher resistant to differential cryptanalysis?

How do you prove that a cipher is resistant to differential cryptanalysis? It's said that Rijndael has been proven resistance to differential cryptanalysis. How do cryptographers do that?
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1answer
58 views

Applications of 3-collisions

I recently read Improved Generic Algorithms for 3-Collisions by Joux and Lucks (Asiacrypt 2009), available as http://eprint.iacr.org/2009/305.pdf. I was wondering about applications of this technique ...
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1answer
184 views

Questions on rank-attacks in Multivariate Cryptography

While reading this article on rank attacks on STS (a public-key scheme based on Multivariate Quadratic (MQ) equations), I stumbled upon some claims that I've also seen in other presentations on ...
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2answers
368 views

Given a message and signature, find a public key that makes the signature valid

Given a message $M$ and a signature $S$, is it feasible to find a RSA public key $(n,e)$ such that $S$ verifies as a valid signature on $M$ (using this public key)? What if we're given one public key ...
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4k views

Definition of Textbook RSA

What is the definition of Textbook RSA? What are some of the properties of textbook RSA? How does it differ from other RSAs?
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1answer
166 views

Seemingly simple (?) decryption question

Forgive the very novice question, but... Given an algorithm which, upon inputting an unchanging 4-character string, generates a variable 6-character string, but having no idea what the algorithm is ...
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2answers
211 views

What are the standard procedures in cryptanalysis to analyze unknown ciphertext?

What are the "standard procedures in cryptanalysis" to analyze unknown ciphertext? In other words: Are there any protocols, officially acknowledged checklists or something like that which represent a ...
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2answers
15k views

How does one attack a two-time pad (i.e. one time pad with key reuse)?

My question might appear the same as the question Taking advantage of one-time pad key reuse?, but actually I did read all the answers and none of them helped me with the details I need. I am new to ...
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0answers
400 views

Blowfish in CBC mode with multi-use keys. Is the 64-bit blocksize a fatal issue if one were to encrypt TBs of data?

Crashplan uses 448-bit Blowfish to encrypt the data you send them. The mode used is CBC, keys are multiple use, and IVs are generated with SecureRandom from JCE. Keys are not derived from the ...
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2answers
315 views

Is it generally possible to employ brute force methods when the encryption scheme is not known? Why or why not?

Lets say you are presented with an encrypted string of bits or text, and no other information. What would be necessary before you could apply brute force methods to decrypting the string? How would a ...
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1answer
567 views

Finding CRC collisions for specific divisor

My current textbook (Information Security: Principles and Practice by Mark Stamp) discusses how to determine the CRC of data via long-division, using XOR instead of subtraction to determine the ...
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1answer
948 views

Security strength of RSA in relation with the modulus size

NIST SP 800-57 §5.6.1 p.62–64 specifies a correspondence between RSA modulus size $n$ and expected security strength $s$ in bits: ...
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1answer
270 views

What do recent announcements about solving the DLP in $GF(2^{6120})$ mean for RSA

After just reading the post Do recent announcements about solving the DLP in $GF(2^{6120})$ apply to schemes proposed for cryptographic use? I was a bit confused. DSA, ElGamal and others are based on ...
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2answers
655 views

Why are bitwise rotations used in cryptography?

Any understanding I have of cryptography stops right around the cipher level. As such, I'm just curious as to why bit shifts and moreover circular bit shift are so prevalent in cryptography.
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1answer
207 views

How insecure in practice?

I am in attempt to understand relative insecurity of certain encryption schemes. Particularly of interest is DES and RC2. I know AES is better and should be used to encrypt. But practically, if ...
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1answer
431 views

Hill-cipher, disordered alphabet

I am going to apply a simple substitution cipher to my input, then encrypt the result with a Hill cipher. How can this be broken, in a chosen-plaintext threat model? In other words, instead of the ...
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1answer
618 views

Using an MD5 hash as a password

Suppose Alice is using a password prompt that only accepts up to 32 characters for any particular password. Memorization of long strings of random characters is not one of Alice's strengths, so she ...
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1answer
1k views

repeating-key xor and hamming distance

I read that to break repeating-key xor you can do the following: try a keysize $n$ and compute the hamming distance between the first $n$ bits of the encrypted string and the bits $n+1$ to $2n$ of the ...
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217 views

Security of tokenization of plain text conversations - cryptanalysis

I came across a marketing video here. They claim to perform AES encryption and tokenization of sensitive data, at the corporate gateway, before it leaves the company firewall destined for the public ...
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1k views

decryption many time pad [duplicate]

I have eleven ciphertexts that were encrypted with the same key (which I don't know). I want to decrypt the last ciphertext. I read similar question like Many time pad attack but I can't solve my ...
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1answer
63 views

Comprehension question on a signature protocol based on the RSA assumption

We have the following two-party protocol between Alice and Bob. Alice sends messages $m_1, m_2, \ldots \in_R \mathbb{Z}_n^*$ to Bob and Bob signs these values by calculating $v_1, v_2, \ldots \in_R ...