Tagged Questions

analysing cryptographic algorithms, potentially uncovering weaknesses in them (e.g. "breaking" them or casting doubts on their actual security)

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1
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1answer
70 views

Is the following aggregation scheme private?

Is the following scheme private? By private i mean an untrusted aggregator (UA) cannot reveal anything other then an aggregate function output on plaintext data Each party holds a secret key $k_i$ ...
2
votes
1answer
178 views

Bellovin 96' attack on IPsec ESP protocol on encryption only option

Can you explain the actual attack? Why does the attacker need to firstly send some arbitrary UDP packet? How can the attacker break the privacy between A and B? Link: The article of Bellovin I'm ...
5
votes
2answers
496 views

Has threefish successfully been attacked (practically or theoretically)?

Reading Schneier's "The Doghouse: Crypteto" dated September 30, 2009, I noticed Bruce Schneier stating: Threefish, the block cipher inside Skein, encrypts data at 7.6 clock cycles/byte with a ...
2
votes
2answers
373 views

How should we interpret the cryptanalysis results of SIMON and SPECK?

The NSA recently released SIMON and SPECK light weight block ciphers. Although initial spec release did not have much of cryptanalysis details, two works later appeared providing the cryptanalysis for ...
6
votes
4answers
277 views

Is there a proof for showing any cryptogram is crackable?

I commonly hear statements along the lines of "all cryptograms are crackable - it's only a matter of time". Is there a proof to show that any cryptogram is "crackable"? The proof may be of a more ...
0
votes
1answer
199 views

modfied man in the middle attack diffie hellman

I have been given a problem in preparation for my cryptography final that I'm not sure how to solve. It asks me to suppose a scenario where instead of where an attacker would intercept some message ...
-1
votes
1answer
135 views

How do I cryptanalyze a password field?

In a PostgreSQL database, I can see the following fields in a table (for a specific record): User = administrator Password = "ceMv9Me6go" Now the following are true: The password length is not ...
2
votes
1answer
121 views

Decryption or attacking DES encrypted file

I have a file that has been encrypted using DES and am looking to decrypt and find a secret message encoded. All I have is the file which is full of binary data. There is no key or anything else which ...
1
vote
2answers
162 views

Would this program be useful in cryptography?

I know nothing of encrypting. I'm not even sure how to tag this. I wrote a program that can calculate this pretty quickly on my macbook pro 2.3GHz IntelCore i7. The two exponents are Mersenne primes, ...
5
votes
1answer
239 views

AES-CTR mode and the Biclique Attack

The biclique attacks that break AES (Biclique Cryptanalysis of the full AES) appear to require decryption oracles to work, presumably because the key schedule of AES is weaker in the decryption ...
2
votes
2answers
328 views

Computing p and q from private key

We are given n (public modulus) where n=pq and e (encryption exponent). Then I was able to crack the private key d, using Wieners attack. So now, I have (n,e,d). My question is, is there a way to ...
3
votes
0answers
168 views

What aspects of information theory are used in modern cryptography? [closed]

In studying modern (and classical) cryptography, many notions from information theory crop up. Unicity distance, min-entropy, compression, encoding, etc. What parts of information theory should be ...
3
votes
2answers
138 views

Is there a name for this 'enhanced' caeser shift and if so, is it trivial to break?

This cipher shifts the letter that it will shift to, after each shift... I used to play with this when I was a kid. I was thinking about it recently and realized that it wasn't as simple as I ...
4
votes
4answers
438 views

Why $n=pq$ with $p=2p'+1$ and $q=2q'+1$ instead of just $n=p'q'$ for RSA crypto?

For RSA cryptography, we know that the modulo $n$ is a product of two big prime numbers(say $p$ and $q$). However, in some documents I see an extension of $p=2p'+1$ and $q=2q'+1$ with $q'$ and $p'$ ...
4
votes
1answer
101 views

Question about the definition of a perfect cipher

I need to prove that the following encryption scheme is a perfect cipher: Let $p$ be a prime. The secret key is a pair $(a,b)$ sampled uniformly at random from $\mathbb{Z}_p^* \times \mathbb{Z}_p$. ...
6
votes
2answers
210 views

Cryptanalysis and weaknesses of SEED cipher

I've discovered that a client has SEED enabled in their SSL ciphers, and would like to know a bit more about it from a security perspective. The Wikipedia article doesn't mention any flaws, yet I've ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

What is the limit of plaintext required to break the Vigenère encryption?

A theoretical question about the Vigenère cipher: Without any knowledge about the key (not even it's length) can we tell how much known or chosen plaintext is needed for the adversary to completely ...
2
votes
2answers
261 views

What does the linear assumption over bilinear groups mean?

In the abstract of "Cryptography with Tamperable and Leaky Memory", at the end of the 3rd paragraph, the authors say: In both schemes we rely on the linear assumption over bilinear groups. What ...
2
votes
2answers
193 views

Hypothetical unknown cipher - security in obscurity?

I'm curious what would happen in the following scenario: Suppose an attacker gets a hold of a cipher-text of sufficiently large length. And suppose he has the means to verify a successful decryption. ...
6
votes
2answers
716 views

Knowing pre-encryption data, can we find the private key CryptoLocker used?

One of our users seems to have been hit by CryptoLocker. As a result, he has a hard drive full of encrypted files. The ransom-ware claims to have used public key encryption on the files. If we know ...
2
votes
1answer
193 views

In RSA, what is faster attacking “d” when plaintext is known, or factoring when M is unknown?

I'm aware of two methods to attack RSA: Brute force factoring, where no plain text is available Brute force (1/e) mod φ where the plain text is available as described here Question Given an ...
1
vote
0answers
101 views

Partial encryption of a file?

I want to partially encrypt a large block of data using AES. Meaning: given plaintext[0:1100], I would like to encrypt ...
1
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0answers
113 views

Cryptanalysis not based on method used to encrypt? [closed]

When doing cryptanalysis on RSA or something number theory based, there are various attacks that all seem to involve number theory (Wikipedia: RSA_(algorithm) ~ Attacks_against_plain_RSA). Similarly, ...
1
vote
2answers
277 views

Solid summary of what encryption remains strong after recent events [closed]

Following the recent government hacking (and subsequent news and fallout), I'm wondering what crypto-systems remain strong (and why) and what crypto-systems were exploited too heavily to be reliable. ...
4
votes
4answers
275 views

Why to try get key out of white box crypto? How can one protect WBC itself?

Help me understand the following. With WBC the question is mainly being stated as can one try to break WBC to identify the key. My question is: Why would one ever want to do that anyways? If one can ...
3
votes
1answer
157 views

Derive a public EC key from two public EC keys

Alice has two EC key pairs: $a_1$, $a_2$ are private keys (integers), $A_1$, $A_2$ are the corresponding public keys (points). Alice and Bob want to create a new public key $C$. Alice must prove that ...
7
votes
5answers
615 views

How to prove the security of the PRNG?

Are there any realties tests or criterias that prove the security of the PRNG? What kind of tests or criteria?
0
votes
1answer
360 views

WIN LM Password Hashes (using John the ripper) [closed]

In a problem set, we've been asked to use John The Ripper to crack a list of Win LANMAN passwords. They are of the following form: 953A55E36AB85C0B9DA92C18555E42E1:0169295E0A6A6B35B2DD9932D10C1978 ...
1
vote
2answers
347 views

How do we prove that AES, DES etc. are secure?

How do we prove that AES, DES etc. are secure? I've read about them and know the basics on how they work, but I still don't quite understand how we can be sure they are secure? What are the proofs?
1
vote
1answer
298 views

What is adversary's advantage in cryptography and why we use it?

The definition of adversary's advantage seems a bit odd for me and I am wondering why do we use it to measure the power of an adversary rather than just use the probability of a PPT adversary ...
3
votes
3answers
303 views

How to attack a fixed LCG with partial output?

To show some colleague programmers exactly how broken C's rand() is (at least on Windows) I decided to break it. So everyone knows the exact parameters, MSVC's ...
1
vote
0answers
116 views

Career advice for our readers [closed]

I am a first year math PhD student with work experience and an MS in math. Do you have any advice regarding internships involved with cryptography and other mathematics other than the NSA? Thanks.
2
votes
1answer
241 views

How much does a successful Distinguishing Attack “break” the attacked stream cipher?

I started reading about the most recent cryptanalysis of RC4 and it's variants. One of the papers I just finished reading ("Two Linear Distinguishing Attacks on VMPC and RC4A and Weakness of RC4 ...
4
votes
2answers
224 views

Is this a structural weakness of Feistel networks?

I'm doing a lot of reading about Feistel networks. Something occurred to me a bit ago that I hadn't realized previously, namely that in any Feistel construction there are bits of the plaintext that ...
5
votes
1answer
104 views

Is there any existing analysis for this construction to turn a tweakable blockcipher into a PRF?

I'm basically looking at this construction to turn a tweakable blockcipher $E_c(x)$ taking a key $k$, nonce $n$, counter $c$ (forming tweak $t = c||n$) and an input $x$ into a PRF on an ...
4
votes
1answer
150 views

Can a PRNG with a fixed amount of entropy always be detected?

Given a fixed seed (i.e. no ongoing source on entropy), is there (practically or theoretically) any PRNG algorithm that can generate an infinite sequence of random numbers such that an observer cannot ...
15
votes
1answer
862 views

What NIST protocol was allegedly backdoored by NSA in 2006?

From a recent NY Times article: Cryptographers have long suspected that the agency planted vulnerabilities in a standard adopted in 2006 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology ...
3
votes
2answers
140 views

Feedback requested on a method of posting a message without revealing the author

So I was thinking about variations on the Dining Cryptographers problem - In some cases, it's useful to be able to post a message without revealing the source, but with the additional constraint of ...
7
votes
6answers
352 views

Do ciphertexts leak information about their algorithmic creators?

If an adversary holds thousands of encrypted files that were encrypted with the same cipher, can he determine which cipher method had been used on the files? Assume that the adversary has no prior ...
1
vote
2answers
403 views

Quadratic residue problem on composite integers

Its believed that the quadratic residue modulo $n=p·q$ for large primes $p$ and $q$ is intractable, which forms the basis of some cryptosystems. However, it is solvable if the factors of $n$ are ...
6
votes
3answers
838 views

Any practical uses of machine learning for cryptography?

I am about to go study for my masters in machine learning, data mining and high performance computing, but have recently become very interested in cryptography after taking Dan Boneh's Cryptography ...
4
votes
2answers
278 views

Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?

I know it's a highly theoretical topic, but I was wondering if there was any research out there about what cryptography would be like assuming that we had access to nondeterministic Turing machines. ...
8
votes
2answers
799 views

Why does DES use exactly 16 rounds?

Why does DES use exactly 16 rounds and not more or less than 16? What is the significance of using 16 rounds?
0
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2answers
246 views

How secure would this code be against cryptanalysis?

Simple version: Create software that takes a database of the dictionary, alphabet, and phrases. Randomly generate a database of random strings of letters/numbers/symbols of varying length. Randomly ...
4
votes
1answer
663 views

Recent attacks on RSA

At Blackhat 2013 this week, there was a talk saying RSA is (essentially) doomed in the near future. networkworld.com ~ “Black Hat: Elliptic curve cryptography coming as smarter algorithms threaten ...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

Specification of the Megamos crypto algorithm

It has recently emerged that a paper that was scheduled to appear at Usenix Security 2013, titled "Dismantling Megamos Crypto: Wirelessly Lockpicking a Vehicle Immobiliser", has been censored ...
5
votes
2answers
356 views

Can you break a multi language code using Frequency analysis?

Let say that I wrote a 26 letter alphabet, each letter of my alphabet represent a letter from the latin alphabet. I'm writing in 3 languages, only I know which languages. Grammar is the one from my ...
2
votes
0answers
107 views

Jumblar: Using map locations as passwords

I had the idea of converting map locations into passwords. Basically Jumblar takes a hash of the user's location and stores this as a comment on the PGP network. The 'stored-hash'(Vague-Hash) ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

Can you explain what the AES paper means by “sharing active S-boxes”?

I am reading the "Biclique cryptanalysis of the full AES" paper. What do they mean by "sharing active S-boxes"? How can this concept can be advantageous to make a bicycle? If there is someone who ...
4
votes
2answers
176 views

Why is it said that if we have a duplicate ciphertext block it can leak our information?

I have been recently going through a question: http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/15767/what-do-key-size-and-block-size-mean-in-cryptography and it created in me a series of doubts. Referring ...