analysing cryptographic algorithms, potentially uncovering weaknesses in them (e.g. "breaking" them or casting doubts on their actual security)

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PBKDF2 Salt and Password Ordering

I am currently reading about PBKDF2, and understand that the salt is used only once, while the password is used multiple times in the computation of the final key (see this question). How would the ...
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423 views

True Random Number Generator by milliseconds per keystroke (TRNG-Kms)

The simplest way to generate truly random numbers for OTP keys is to measure the time in milliseconds between each keystroke on a keyboard. The randomness depends on the user typing in various speeds. ...
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147 views

Twisted curves in protocol

I've come to understand that twisted curves, as for instance defined in the Brainpool specifications, are $F(p)$-isomorphic to their regular $F(p)$ equivalents. So brainpoolP256r1 is isomorphic to ...
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210 views

Is ISAAC Cipher Cryptographically Secure?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISAAC_(cipher) This question was asked before but the answers seem vague, and I want to know about ISAAC specifically, not ISAAC+. It seems some cryptanalysis was ...
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137 views

How would using only one s-box affect security of Blowfish?

Schneier says: Fewer and smaller S-boxes. It may be possible to reduce the number of S-boxes from four to one. Additionally, it may be possible to overlap entries in a single S-box: entry 0 ...
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383 views

Understanding a Blowfish cryptanalysis

I'm reading a cryptanalysis on Blowfish, and I've come across something that I don't quite get. Let's denote $$\delta = a \oplus a'$$ where a and a' are bytes that cause a collision in some S-box ...
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238 views

Are asymptotic lower bounds relevant to cryptography?

An asymptotic lower bound such as exponential-hardness is generally thought to imply that a problem is "inherently difficult". Encryption that is "inherently difficult" to break is thought to be ...
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114 views

Image sharing without data overhead

The idea is to share $n$ images among $n$ persons so that all images can be reconstructed by someone in possession of all shares. However, there must not be any data overhead (which means the shares ...
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324 views

KDF based on HMAC-SHA-256

Is KDF based on HMAC-SHA-256(Hashed Message Authentication Code, Secure Hash Algorithm) algorithm a suitable option to generate symmetric key from the secret key? What is the basic funda, behind ...
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122 views

Why is Lamport-Diffie secure?

Why is Lamport-Diffie secure? I note that there is a demonstration based on onewayness (in the book postquantum cryptography). But a one way function is not sufficient to ensure that it can not infer ...
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172 views

Derive a public EC key from two public EC keys

Alice has two EC key pairs: $a_1$, $a_2$ are private keys (integers), $A_1$, $A_2$ are the corresponding public keys (points). Alice and Bob want to create a new public key $C$. Alice must prove that ...
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60 views

Applications of 3-collisions

I recently read Improved Generic Algorithms for 3-Collisions by Joux and Lucks (Asiacrypt 2009), available as http://eprint.iacr.org/2009/305.pdf. I was wondering about applications of this technique ...
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224 views

Any historical accounts of cryptanalysis of Jefferson's wheel cipher?

David Kahn in his book "The Codebreakers" wrote about Jefferson's wheel cipher, saying that To this day the Navy uses it… (the book was first published in 1967) Are there any historical accounts ...
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309 views

Has there been any cryptanalysis of RC4-52?

Several websites ( such as Is there a secure cryptosystem that can be performed mentally? ) briefly mention RC4-52 as a modification of standard RC4. RC4-52 has only with 52 instead of 256 elements ...
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353 views

Security analysis of a matrix multiplication protocol

Suppose Alice would like to obtain the product of two mXm matrices i.e. A and B. Alice has A, whereas Bob has B. Since Alice does not want to reveal A to Bob, she chooses a mXm random invertable ...
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Using machine-learning techniques for data-dependent operations in ciphers

From 'Methods of Symmetric Cryptanalysis' by Dmitry Khovratovich, The data-dependent operations are one of the most controversial design concepts. We say that an operation is data-dependent, if it ...
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66 views

Managing data permissions/access through asymmetric cryptography

I want to manage authorization, as 3rd-party permissions, through asymmetric cryptography. I'm concerned about how is it possible to share access of encrypted data with N entities, and be able to ...
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128 views

Basic attacks on McEliece; finding S and P

Take a McEliece cryptosystem with public generator matrix $G' = S G P$ where $G$ is a generator of a secret code with known fast decoding (not necessarily a Goppa code over $\mathbb{F}_2$), $S$ is ...
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171 views

Using the same private key for two ECC key pairs

Let $(d_1,Q_1)$ and $(d_2,Q_2)$ be ECC key pairs over two different elliptic curves (say NIST P-224 and NIST P-256). According to the Elliptic Curve Discrete Logarithm Problem (ECDLP), if the private ...
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What aspects of information theory are used in modern cryptography? [closed]

In studying modern (and classical) cryptography, many notions from information theory crop up. Unicity distance, min-entropy, compression, encoding, etc. What parts of information theory should be ...
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2k views

Is python a secure programming language for cryptography?

I know Python is a powerful programming language but is it secure for cryptography? I mean is it possible to reverse engineer the program (written in python) and discover the algorithm of cryptography ...
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299 views

Is it possible to attack RSA with a WalkSat derivative?

We consider a large $n$-bit number $N$. We want to find a factor, if it admits any. For $m$ taking values from $1$ to $n$, perform the following three steps (actually, for each $m$, perform many ...
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180 views

Known plaintext, unknown 128 bit block cipher

I have an encrypted configuration file from an embedded device which I'm trying to decrypt. The file seems to be encrypted in 128bit blocks, as changing a single option causes a 16 byte block to ...
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931 views

Problems with using AES Key as IV in CBC-Mode

I'm a pentester and currently analysing a web application which are using some strange encryption scheme. The point is: They encrypt using AES-128, generate a (not cryptographic secure) key and use ...
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229 views

Frequency of letters change by the length of the texts?

In terms of the frequency of letters, how is it possible to have different frequent letters when the length of the text I'm analyzing is shorter? At the moment, I'm comparing the frequencies of a ...
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929 views

Berlekamp-Massey algorithm: case when sequence length is less than double the length of the LFSR

Suppose that we have a sequence of $N$ digits which is produced by a Linear Feedback Shift Register (LFSR) and the shortest such LFSR is of length $L$. A very important tool in cryptanalysis of stream ...
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120 views

Rounds in cryptography

I need to make it clear I know nothing about crypto so in that context I'm hoping to clear up some confusion: As I understand it a "round" in a cipher is one encryption operation and a cipher like ...
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277 views

How does compression before encryption leak info about the input?

Apparently current best practices recommend that you do not compress before you encrypt. For example in this blog entry (*): http://sockpuppet.org/blog/2013/07/22/applied-practical-cryptography/ It ...
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216 views

Impact of distinguishing between random text and cipher text?

In theory, distinguishing cipher text from random text is considered insecure for any PRP algorithm. Say for example - due to Patarin's proof with about six rounds of Feistel Network - the attacker ...
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160 views

implication of tweak on bruteforcing a block cipher

Consider a KPA attack, where the attacker gets known plain text and the corresponding cipher text. Since the encryption algorithm is known, he can brute force all possibilities of key bits. What is ...
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434 views

Safety of DSA key parameters sharing

I'm looking for a solution to use in a context where I need to be able to generate new asymmetric key pairs quickly (using a widely recognized algorithm, and EC-DSA is not applicable). It sounds like ...
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66 views

Is it hard to recover $p$ from $k \phi(p)$?

Given $k\phi(p)$, is it hard to recover $p$? Here, $p$ is a large prime, $\phi(\cdot)$ is Euler's totient function and $k$ is an unknown integer. Or what's the complexity to recover $p$ from $k ...
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What does the linear assumption over bilinear groups mean?

In the abstract of "Cryptography with Tamperable and Leaky Memory", at the end of the 3rd paragraph, the authors say: In both schemes we rely on the linear assumption over bilinear groups. What ...
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How to get the keyword from a keyword cipher?

I was given a ciphertext and now I am trying to break it via looking for the keyword. This is a keyword cipher. So: PlainEnglish: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ If ...
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RFID Protocol Cryptanalysis

Assume we have the following scheme for RFID: TAG & READER both have initially k keys. Every session the TAG computes $k_i$=F($k_{i-1})$ where F is a function which computes XOR of previous key ...
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168 views

Has there been any cryptanalysis of AES under a non-uniformly distributed key?

The standard security property demanded of a blockcipher is that it be a pseudo-random permutation; i.e., given a uniformly random key, the blockcipher should be computationally indistinguishable from ...
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671 views

DES Encryption Algorithm all 64 bits for key instead of 56 bits

Would a DES algorithm that uses all 64 bits for the key instead of just the 56 bits be more secure? I have been thinking about it but those 8 bits used for parity are very useful and but including ...
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439 views

Breaking Double Encryption

I am trying to understand how an attacker knows when he has successfully decrypted a ciphertext for an assignment. As such, some pointers/hints for the following questions would be greatly ...
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153 views

Publicly exposed hash of private key

Would exposing a cryptographic hash function's digest (e.g. SHA-3) of RSA private key data compromise the key? If so, what are the possible (cryptanalysis-) vectors for attacking the key if an ...
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544 views

How should we interpret the cryptanalysis results of SIMON and SPECK?

The NSA recently released SIMON and SPECK light weight block ciphers. Although initial spec release did not have much of cryptanalysis details, two works later appeared providing the cryptanalysis for ...
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548 views

Computing p and q from private key

We are given n (public modulus) where n=pq and e (encryption exponent). Then I was able to crack the private key d, using Wieners attack. So now, I have (n,e,d). My question is, is there a way to ...
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138 views

Can you explain what the AES paper means by “sharing active S-boxes”?

I am reading the "Biclique cryptanalysis of the full AES" paper. What do they mean by "sharing active S-boxes"? How can this concept can be advantageous to make a bicycle? If there is someone who ...
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328 views

How insecure in practice?

I am in attempt to understand relative insecurity of certain encryption schemes. Particularly of interest is DES and RC2. I know AES is better and should be used to encrypt. But practically, if ...
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181 views

What are the dangers of predictable (repeated) plaintext structures?

When using a "good", modern cipher (specifically one that provides ciphertext indistinguishability), is it a problem at all if there is some well-known structure in all plaintexts? For example, ...
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202 views

How hard is to find the operators of an addition knowing the sum of them?

I want to learn whether or no there is a cryptographic primitive,scheme assumption that is based on the following hard problem if it is hard . By hard we mean that we have a polynomial adversary: The ...
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351 views

How do I demonstrate that a PRNG not designed for cryptography is not suitable for generating passwords?

This is a replication of this question on Stack Overflow. There's class Random in .NET runtime which is designed for use as a cheap fast source of pseudo-random ...
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949 views

Finding CRC collisions for specific divisor

My current textbook (Information Security: Principles and Practice by Mark Stamp) discusses how to determine the CRC of data via long-division, using XOR instead of subtraction to determine the ...
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Permuting Small Sized Set in Practice

Imagine we have a set $S$ of $m$ elements and we wants to permutes the set elements. Thus the original position of each element should be unknown after permuting. If we define a permutation function ...
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87 views

How do we guarantee plaintext is coprime in RSA?

The specifications for RSA state: $P^{\phi(N)} \equiv 1 ~mod~N$ if and only if $P$ and $N$ are coprime. Here $P$ is the plaintext and $N$ is the product of two suitable primes $x_1, x_2$. My question ...
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How to accurately calculate Unicity Distance for English?

The Unicity Distance for the DES cipher is around $8.6$ characters, and can be calculated using the $U=H(k)/D$ formula, where $D = R - r$, and where $R = 8$ is the number of bits in a byte (ASCII is 7 ...