3
votes
1answer
135 views

Twisted curves in protocol

I've come to understand that twisted curves, as for instance defined in the Brainpool specifications, are $F(p)$-isomorphic to their regular $F(p)$ equivalents. So brainpoolP256r1 is isomorphic to ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Why does knowing the number of points on a curve help solve ECCDLP?

Perhaps, this is a really obvious question, but I am still having trouble understanding how this all fits together. Why is knowing the number of points on an Elliptic Curve helpful in cracking it? ...
3
votes
0answers
136 views

Using the same private key for two ECC key pairs

Let $(d_1,Q_1)$ and $(d_2,Q_2)$ be ECC key pairs over two different elliptic curves (say NIST P-224 and NIST P-256). According to the Elliptic Curve Discrete Logarithm Problem (ECDLP), if the private ...
3
votes
1answer
155 views

Derive a public EC key from two public EC keys

Alice has two EC key pairs: $a_1$, $a_2$ are private keys (integers), $A_1$, $A_2$ are the corresponding public keys (points). Alice and Bob want to create a new public key $C$. Alice must prove that ...
4
votes
1answer
204 views

Why doesn't this replay attack work on ECDSA?

I've just started working with elliptic curves and ECSDA in particular, so my understanding of the underlying math isn't great. The thing I'm currently stuck on is trying to understand why replay ...
2
votes
2answers
559 views

ECC algorithm pollard's $\rho$ complexity

One of the methods to break a ECDLP is Pollard's rho algorithm. When ECDLP is defined over a finite field $F_p$, and given a relation $S=w.T$, where S and T are a member of $F_p$. Then ECDLP is to ...
10
votes
2answers
882 views

How does the MOV attack work?

What exactly is the MOV attack, how does it actually work, and what is it used for? It's explained briefly here and I'd like to know what it is more / what is it fully used for.