Factorization is the problem of taking an integer and finding the set of prime numbers that produce the integer when multiplied together. For large integers with large factors, factorization is hard and is the basis for cryptosystems like RSA.

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How big an RSA key is considered secure today?

I think 1024 bit RSA keys were considered secure ~5 years ago, but I assume that's not true anymore. Can 2048 or 4096 keys still be relied upon, or have we gained too much computing power in the ...
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Is it feasible to build an index of prime factors?

Would it be possible to break an RSA key, in for example 1 week of time, if the cracker have already spent X number of years building an index of primes by performing every permutation of existing ...
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Security strength of RSA in relation with the modulus size

NIST SP 800-57 §5.6.1 p.62–64 specifies a correspondence between RSA modulus size $n$ and expected security strength $s$ in bits: ...
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Is knowing the private key of RSA equivalent to the factorization of $N$?

Given the RSA modulus $N$ the fastest method to factor it is of sub-exponent order. But, now if I know the private key $d$ of RSA, does that mean I can factor $N$ efficiently?. It intuitively seems ...
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Modern integer factorization software

What are the modern software packages that can be used to factoring large numbers into primes. By modern I mean developed and made public within the last 5 years. I'm interested in things that are ...
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Why are elliptic curve variants of RSA “chiefly of academic interest”?

Yesterday I was thinking about elliptic curve variants of popular protocols/algorithms (ECDH, ECES[1], etc) and the thought occured that I had never seen an elliptic curve variant of RSA. My ...
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RSA leak bits to factor N

Suppose you randomly generate large primes p and q as in RSA, and then tell me N=pq but not p or q. Then, you would like to actually let me factor N, except you should tell me as few bits of ...
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RSA and prime difference

It is known that the two prime factors $p$ and $q$ of an RSA modulus $n$ should not be too close to each other, otherwise an attacker may factor the modulus. In other words, $\Delta = \left| p - q ...
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uniqueness of the RSA public modulus

What is the probability that two separate RSA public moduli are the same? For example, consider a 2048-bit modulus. The number seems to be huge, but the choice for prime factors p and q is much more ...
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What is the progress on the MIT LCS35 Time Capsule Crypto-Puzzle?

Ron Rivest posed a puzzle in 1999. MIT LCS35 Time Capsule Crypto-Puzzle. The problem is to compute $2^{2^t} \pmod n$ for specified values of $t$ and $n$. Here $n$ is the product of two large ...
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What does “Inverting the RSA function is as hard as factoring” mean (a rigorous explanation or intuitive will do)?

I was reading that a current open problem is if inverting the RSA function is as hard as factoring. Does this mean that, its an open problem whether, if given a subroutine that computes in ...
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How to calculate the time it'll take to crack RSA or DH?

Sometimes the easiest way to describe security of a type of cryptography is to say that "the time it takes to solve for an x-bit key would be y years". How would one go about doing such a calculation ...
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RSA security assumptions - does breaking the DLP also break RSA? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Would the ability to efficiently find Discrete Logs have any impact on the security of RSA? I'm wondering if breaking the DLP, that is the basis for ElGamal and DSA, ...
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Quadratic residuosity problem reduction to integer factorization

How can one show how to reduce the quadratic residuosity problem to an integer factorization?
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Security relevance of random factor in Paillier

In the Paillier cryptosystem [1] the encryption of $m \in \mathbb{Z}_N$ with randomness $r \in \mathbb{Z}_n^*$ is $c = g^m r^n \bmod{n^2}$. The additive-homomorphic property of the system shows that ...