Hash-based digital signatures, such as Lamport one-time signatures, are digital signature schemes based on a (non-trapdoor) one-way function such as a cryptographic hash. Such schemes are expected to remain secure even against attacks using quantum computers.

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Do other one-time signature schemes exist?

I'm curious to know if there are any one-time signature schemes other than Lamport's or its variants (Merkle trees are one such variant). The first I've discovered is called "Bins and Balls" which ...
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Collision attacks on digital signatures

After reading this document about MD5 collision attacks, I still don't understand how collisions can make digital signatures insecure. In the paper, the researchers created two files with the same ...
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how to verify subset of hashes from hash list

I need to verify a couple hashed (SHA256) integers from a list of approximately 50 hashed integers in a message. The list can be divided into groups. The (plain) integer data is not in the message, ...
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Why are the bit lengths of keys and digests equal in Lamport signatures?

In Lamport's one time signature scheme: One way function to convert a pseudo random number private key to a public key takes $\{0,1\}^n$ and returns $\{0,1\}^n$. Cryptographic hash function to ...
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Factorization or discrete logarithm is difficult for an attacker?

I have read that difficulty in breaking many algorithms are based either on Factorization or discrete logarithm. I am reading about schemes that are similar to RSA which make use of integer ...
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If you receive a message with a digital signature, how do you know what verification key to use and the verification algorithm?

Really, I'm asking how do you know who sent it? My confusion has arisen from the following scenario... Problems with Signing-then-encrypting. If Alice digitally signed some data and then encrypted ...
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Uniformly distributed sub-sequences of a main PRG sequence

Let $ g_s $ be a pseudo-random generator that generates uniform distributions of numbers ($s$ : seed) of a fixed bit-size. One wants to compare the pseudo-randomness of certain subsets of elements ...