Hash-based digital signatures, such as Lamport one-time signatures, are digital signature schemes based on a (non-trapdoor) one-way function such as a cryptographic hash. Such schemes are expected to remain secure even against attacks using quantum computers.

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Lamport signature: How many signatures are need to forge a signature?

Lamport signature: Signing the message Note that now Alice's private key is used and should never be used again. The other 256 random numbers that she did not use for the signature she must never ...
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What security do digital signatures provide (like used when signing PDFs)?

I want to ask you one question about digital signatures as they are (for example) used when digitally signing PDFs. We know that if our document has a digital signature, we can detect if the original ...
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Can one use a Cryptographic Accumulator to efficiently store Lamport public keys without the need of a Merkle Tree?

One of the problems of one-time Lamport signatures is that public keys are disposed after use, so you must generate many keys and store them in a Merkle tree. The root is the "real" public key and ...
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Stateless hash based public key cryptography?

Merkle-Winternitz signatures based on fractal hash trees are an attractive alternative to other post-quantum cryptographic schemes, in particular since they are conceptually simple, the security ...
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One-time digital signatures

Are there digital signatures for which, given two documents signed by the same key, one could derive the key? With such one-time signatures, one may be able to design a cryptocurrency based on ...
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Quantum resistance of Lamport signatures

The Lamport-Diffie signature scheme is said to be quantum-resistant. Why is that? What would a quantum attempt to attack this signature scheme look like, and how does it fail?
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Difference between salted hash and keyed hashing?

A cryptographic salt is additional input other than message itself for a hash function so that it prevents attacker from launching dictionary attacks . Usually the salt is stored along with the hash ...
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Proof of shared secret through key derivation

Alice gives a random key $K$ (e.g. 32 bytes long) to Bob through a secure channel. Bob want to prove to Alice through an unsecured channel that he knows the key. Is it secure for Bob to send ...
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Hash collision resistance requirements for Lamport signatures

According to the original paper, Lamport one-time signature scheme uses two one-way functions: $F$ and $G$. The former one, $F$, is used to create a public key by hashing elements of the private key ...
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Is ed25519 a “hash signature”

Writing my last question, I saw the hash-signature tag. I tried to research it best I could, but I'm simply overwhelmed in this field. I don't think it means to simply hash data before signing, but ...
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Is it necessary to use single hash function for signature generation and HMAC?

I am trying to figure out if we need to use single hash function across all the places in a ssh session. i.e – signature generation/verification and HMAC calculation/validation. Is it possible to use ...
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Usability of padding scheme in blinded RSA signature?

In Wikipedia's article on Blind signature, in the section Dangers of blind signing which describes RSA blinding attack one reads the following This attack works because in this blind signature ...
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Winternitz One-Time Signature

I am reading the page 38 in this "Post Quantum Cryptography" book (Equations 8 and 9). My question is, why to compute the verification key $Y$, $f$ is applied $2^w-1$ times? Are there any security ...
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A fast non-cryptographic hash function that is “strong enough”?

I'm designing a simple one-time-password mechanism for authentication against a possibly-insecure server - i.e. I don't want to use symmetric shared secrets. The first idea that came into mind was ...
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Certificate signature with SHA-1 and RSA: where do 1888 bits come from?

Plenty of X.509 Certificates use "PKCS#1 SHA1 with RSA encryption" as the Certificate Signature Algorithm for generating a 2048-bit signature. The SHA-1 hash function generates a hash value of 160 ...
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Lamport-Diffie + attempting to invert OWF

I am studying Lamport-Diffie signature scheme and in my lecture present the follow algorithm for attempting to invert the one way function $f$, where $f$ is used to compute the public key of this ...
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Merkle Signature Generation

In the section 2 (page 42) of the book "Post Quantum Cryptography", it says: Then he generates the one-time signature $\sigma_{\text{OTS}}$ of the digest using the $s$-th one-time signature key ...
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Lamport-Diffie + Security Proof

I am studying Lamport-Diffie signature scheme. In the lecture present the algorithm $A'$ for attempting to invert the one way function $f$, where $f$ is used to compute the public key. My question is ...
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Is it ok to send part of digital signature if we have bandwidth constraints?

When creating digital signatures is it ok to send part of it when we have bandwidth constraints?
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collision resistant summarizer for long hash values

how we can summarize SHA-256 into shorter values when we for example can't handle more than 128 bits on system? its better just use first 128bit and ignore the rest of bits or split full value and XOR ...
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What is a Trapdoor in Merkle Signature?

Merkle signature (pag. 40) use than public key (verification key) the root of the Merkle Tree and than private key (to sign) the set of pre-images of the $g(Y_i)$ where $Y_i$ is the verification key ...
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Signing a document: which algorithm to use?

What I want to do is to digitally sign a document. I am new to cryptography and was wondering what issues to take into account. The only criteria is that a textual document signed should produce a ...
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Factorization or discrete logarithm is difficult for an attacker?

I have read that difficulty in breaking many algorithms are based either on Factorization or discrete logarithm. I am reading about schemes that are similar to RSA which make use of integer ...
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Convert SpookyHash to semi-secure 192bit hash [closed]

What do you think of converting SpookyHash into semi-secure 192bit hash function by this way: increase security by using 8 * 8byte = 512bit blocks instead of 8 * 12byte blocks, but remaining 8 * ...