A key schedule is an algorithm that expands a relatively short master key to a relatively large expanded key for later use in an encryption and decryption algorithm.

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Is the key schedule of Serpent a circle?

The creation of the prekeys for Serpent works by XORing some previous values with a counter and a fixed value. Every word is 32 bits big and 4 words form a round key (after applying a S-Box, but this ...
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Is there a reference that prove that the AES Key Schedule generate random looking round keys?

Starting from uniformly random generated AES master key, is there a reference that prove that an specific roundkey can be considered as uniformly random generated as well ?
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Weak key schedule IDEA [closed]

Why was such a weak key schedule chosen for IDEA? The key schedule of IDEA works like this: Divide the key (128 bit) into 8 round keys, each 16 bit long. This are the first 8 "round" keys (6 keys per ...
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Rotation table for 8 round DES

I'm trying to implement DES from scratch using the NIST paper and the Wikipedia article on DES. I got 16 round DES done, but I can't seem to get 8 round DES working. I figure it's because I got the ...
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How secure is the AES master key if Round Keys are found

If an attacker finds some round key of AES256, is it possible to find the master key? How safe is the master key if an attackers finds multiple round keys?
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Entropy test for AES Key Schedule

According to the article "Lest We Remember: Cold Boot Attacks on Encryption Keys" there is a quick and dirty entropy test that can help to find possible AES Key Schedules in memory dumps. Although ...
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a doubt in Rijndael's key expansion sizes

I've often heard/read that AES key sizes 256 & 192 would be weaker than 128 or not stronger as expected from the size increase, but I've never seen a proof. How does one proof the strength of a ...
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Does the key schedule function need to be a one-way function?

For some key schedule $e_n(e_{n-1}(k))$ (where $e_{n-1}(k)$ is the result of the previous round) , does $e$ need to be a one-way function? In the case of DES or Rijndael the key schedule doesn't ...