A key schedule is an algorithm that expands a relatively short master key to a relatively large expanded key for later use in an encryption and decryption algorithm.

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What are the requirements of a key schedule?

In the first block cipher I designed I used a CSPRNG to generate the round keys. The purpose was to at least have a chance of creating a (hopefully!) secure cipher on the first try (but please don't ...
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Rijndael variant using AES for key schedule?

The weakest part of Rijndael is considered to be the key schedule (I believe that this is true for all variants, including ones not standardized as AES). One solution to this problem is to use ...
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Compression in key generation of DES algorithm

Does anyone have a pseudo-code or an algorithm or even a diagram of the compression (pc2) of the DES algorithm? I can't find a relation between the bits that are dropped, even when I do it manually ...
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AES Inverse Key Schedule

I have a 128-bit input-block and the corresponding cipher-block given. Additionally I have the last round-key given. Is it now possible to get (calculate) the associated cipher-key? I already ...
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More rounds after AES related key attack?

In his blog Schneier discusses that there is a new related key attack on 10 rounds of AES-256 "Another attack can break a 10 round version of AES-256 in 245 time, but it uses a stronger type of ...
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Block Cipher Without Key Schedule?

I'm designing a cryptography assignment for a college security course, and one of the problems is to perform a simple meet-in-the-middle attack on a 2-round, 2-key cipher. Since we want this to be a ...
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search of patterns in key schedules

I am developing a new key schedule, and there is this article (Enhanced Key Expansion for AES-256 by Using Even-Odd Method) where the authors also propose a new algorithm and one of the objectives is ...
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Is the key schedule of Serpent a circle?

The creation of the prekeys for Serpent works by XORing some previous values with a counter and a fixed value. Every word is 32 bits big and 4 words form a round key (after applying a S-Box, but this ...
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Is there a reference that prove that the AES Key Schedule generate random looking round keys?

Starting from uniformly random generated AES master key, is there a reference that prove that an specific roundkey can be considered as uniformly random generated as well ?
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Weak key schedule IDEA [closed]

Why was such a weak key schedule chosen for IDEA? The key schedule of IDEA works like this: Divide the key (128 bit) into 8 round keys, each 16 bit long. This are the first 8 "round" keys (6 keys per ...
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211 views

Rotation table for 8 round DES

I'm trying to implement DES from scratch using the NIST paper and the Wikipedia article on DES. I got 16 round DES done, but I can't seem to get 8 round DES working. I figure it's because I got the ...
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How secure is the AES master key if Round Keys are found

If an attacker finds some round key of AES256, is it possible to find the master key? How safe is the master key if an attackers finds multiple round keys?
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Entropy test for AES Key Schedule

According to the article "Lest We Remember: Cold Boot Attacks on Encryption Keys" there is a quick and dirty entropy test that can help to find possible AES Key Schedules in memory dumps. Although ...
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a doubt in Rijndael's key expansion sizes

I've often heard/read that AES key sizes 256 & 192 would be weaker than 128 or not stronger as expected from the size increase, but I've never seen a proof. How does one proof the strength of a ...
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Does the key schedule function need to be a one-way function?

For some key schedule $e_n(e_{n-1}(k))$ (where $e_{n-1}(k)$ is the result of the previous round) , does $e$ need to be a one-way function? In the case of DES or Rijndael the key schedule doesn't ...