5
votes
3answers
592 views

RSA with modulus n=p²q

I've been wondering what would happen if the RSA modulus would be $n=p^2q$ instead of $n=pq$. I feel like there is an obvious security flaw (as there is with most modifications). Would this choise of ...
2
votes
2answers
171 views

In RSA, why does $p$ have to be bigger than $q$ where $n=p \times q$?

In openSSL – during RSA key generation – if $q$ is bigger than $p$, they exchange them. Why is that?
0
votes
0answers
68 views

RSA: Common modulus attack problem [duplicate]

I understand in theory how the common modulus attack works (as described here: how to use common modulus attack?) Though, I did not understand completely how it worked with a negative $s_i$. Since ...
1
vote
2answers
117 views

Three different numbers with x³=x mod p

p is a prime greater than 2 and $a \in \mathbb{Z}_p$. Why are there exactly three solutions for a³ = a mod p? Obviously 0 and 1 are both in $\mathbb{Z}$ and valid solutions, but that still means, ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Modulo properties of two prime numbers

I am supposed to prove that x = y mod (p*q) <=> x = y mod p and x = y mod q with p and q are prime numbers. It somewhat sounds reasonable to me, but unfortunately I don't have any clue how to prove ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

RSA: Fermat's Little Theorem and the multiplicative inverse relationship between mod n and mod phi(n)

I'm learning about the proof of the RSA encryption algorithm, and I'm clearly fudging or missing something, because for me it doesn't add up. When generating keys for RSA encryption, we make sure ...
1
vote
1answer
223 views

modulo operations in crypto algorithms

Am not a mathematician. Every crypto specification I see uses the modulo operation. For example RSA - If $e$ is the public key and $m$ is the plaintext with a modulus $n$ - the cipher text is $c = ...
2
votes
4answers
320 views

Pseudocode for constant time modular exponentiation

I'm looking to implement modular exponentiation (for RSA) in constant time, but most of the examples I've found are more mathematical descriptions of the operations. Are there any references with ...
1
vote
2answers
97 views

Proof for exponentiation in modular arithemtic

If $e$ is a natural number, then this is true: $$m^e \bmod\ n = (m\bmod\ n)^e\bmod\ n$$ This is often used when encrypting, especially with RSA, since one can avoid directly calculating $m^e$, ...
2
votes
3answers
456 views

How do institutions like banks do RSA with big primes?

When encrypting with RSA it is often infeasible to decrypt by just doing c^d mod n, because for example when using the primes $(p,q)=(12553,1233)$, which are small ...
3
votes
2answers
207 views

Avoiding overflow when encrypting with RSA

When encrypting with RSA one calculates $ m^e \pmod n $ by doing the following: m^e % n Where $m$ is what we encrypt. Often $e$ is a very big number to make it ...
2
votes
1answer
162 views

Why encrypting with private and public keys produce the same result?

Let say $e = 5$, $n = 119$ and $d = 77$. If I encrypt, for example, $m=15$ I get: $$m_1 = m^e=15 ^ 5 \mod 119 = 36\qquad\text{and}\qquad m_2 =m^d= 15 ^ {77} \mod 119 = 36$$. Why? Is it always like ...
4
votes
4answers
411 views

Where does the $\varphi(n)$ part of RSA come from?

$e d \equiv 1 \pmod{\varphi(n)}$ Where does the $\varphi(n)$ part come from? How did the inventors of RSA arrive at $\varphi(n)$?
7
votes
2answers
411 views

How does Clifford Cocks 'Non-Secret Encryption' work?

I have read Clifford Cocks "A Note on 'Non-secret Encryption'" and thought I would try to implement this, but I don't seem to be able to get it to work. I'm obviously missing something. From the ...
4
votes
1answer
159 views

Solve a Modular Exponentiation

It might be common, but if we had to solve an equation like this $m=s^{e}$ mod $n$ where $m,e,n$ are known. How can we find $s$. What optimisations could be applied? And what would the complexity of ...
3
votes
2answers
799 views

In RSA, why is it important choosing e so that it is coprime to φ(n)?

When choosing the public exponent e, it is stressed that $e$ must be coprime to $\phi(n)$, i.e. $\gcd(\phi(n), e) = 1$. I know that a common choice is to have $e = 3$ (which requires a good padding ...
2
votes
2answers
216 views

How does this happen in RSA malleability?

I don't understand how the $E(m)$ turns into $E(mt)$. I mean, I don't know how does that transformation happen and how does the equation occur. $$E(m) \cdot t^e \bmod n = (mt)^e \bmod n = E(mt)$$ ...
3
votes
1answer
287 views

How difficult is it to brute force d in RSA: d = (1/e) mod φ in a CPT attack?

Given that RSA key generation works by computing: n = pq φ = (p-1)(q-1) d = (1/e) mod φ If I was an attacker who wanted to brute force d, could I brute force d given just the public key, the ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

RSA Proof - di-mgt - modulo properties

I´m trying to follow one of the very detailed RSA Proofs given by di-mgt: "RSA theory", but unfortunately I stuck at the beginning of solution (chapter 3). I don´t understand where the second part ...
4
votes
2answers
175 views

how to iteratively calculate a^emod n with modulus n sized 4096 bits

In most sites the exponent of the RSA public key is 24 bits. But the modulus can get to 4096 bits size. I have an accelerator that can get max. 2112 bit size modulus. It calculates ...
1
vote
1answer
291 views

RSA smaller number work-out-by-hand not working - I think I made a mistake

I tried out the paper/pencil explanation @ http://sergematovic.tripod.com/rsa1.html, and it seemed to make sense just fine until I came to decryption. Here is what I worked out: Key Creation: Choose ...
5
votes
3answers
681 views

Is sharing the modulus for multiple RSA key pairs secure?

In the public-key system RSA scheme, each user holds beyond a public modulus $m$ a public exponent, $e$, and a private exponent, $d$. Suppose that Bob's private exponent is learned by other users. ...
10
votes
1answer
4k views

Calculating RSA private exponent when given public exponent and the modulus factors using extended euclid

When given $p = 5, q = 11, N = 55$ and $e = 17$, I'm trying to compute the RSA private key $d$. I can calculate $\varphi(N) = 40$, but my lecturer then says to use the extended Euclidean algorithm to ...