Modular arithmetic is a system of arithmetic for integers, where numbers "wrap around" upon reaching a certain value… the modulus.

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Calculating RSA private exponent when given public exponent and the modulus factors using extended euclid

When given $p = 5, q = 11, N = 55$ and $e = 17$, I'm trying to compute the RSA private key $d$. I can calculate $\varphi(N) = 40$, but my lecturer then says to use the extended Euclidean algorithm to ...
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Shadowed identity in cryptography

I was trying to implement zero knowledge protocol for authentication based on the paper "A Practical Zero-Knowledge Protocol Fitted to Security Microprocessor Minimizing Both Transmission and Memory". ...
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Is sharing the modulus for multiple RSA key pairs secure?

In the public-key system RSA scheme, each user holds beyond a public modulus $m$ a public exponent, $e$, and a private exponent, $d$. Suppose that Bob's private exponent is learned by other users. ...
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In RSA, why is it important choosing e so that it is coprime to φ(n)?

When choosing the public exponent e, it is stressed that $e$ must be coprime to $\phi(n)$, i.e. $\gcd(\phi(n), e) = 1$. I know that a common choice is to have $e = 3$ (which requires a good padding ...
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How does Clifford Cocks 'Non-Secret Encryption' work?

I have read Clifford Cocks "A Note on 'Non-secret Encryption'" and thought I would try to implement this, but I don't seem to be able to get it to work. I'm obviously missing something. From the ...
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Is there an upper bound to the private exponent in RSA?

In the RSA algorithm, we choose $p$ and $q$ as prime numbers and we select a value $e$ which is coprime to $\varphi(pq)=(p-1)(q-1)$. Then we calculate $d:=e^{-1}\bmod\varphi(pq)$. My question is: ...
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Public key crypto without modular arithmetic?

This comment from Reddit math, in response to a statement about how people can communicate secrets to each other with a third party listening, has a very small, simple example of public key ...
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How does NaCL Poly1305 implementation do modular multiplication?

The NaCL ref implementation of Poly1305 performs modular multiplication to calculate a polynomial $\mod 2^{130} - 5$ using the following modular multiplication ...
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What are the computational benefits of primes close to the power of 2?

Recently I was reading some article about the Bernstein's Curve25519. This is a particular Montgomery curve over $\mathbb{F}_q$ where $q = {2^{255}-19}$. What I missed or was unable to understand is ...
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How do institutions like banks do RSA with big primes?

When encrypting with RSA it is often infeasible to decrypt by just doing c^d mod n, because for example when using the primes $(p,q)=(12553,1233)$, which are small ...
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Why does this square root algorithm work?

I've been doing some elliptic curve cryptography, and a library I'm using has this slightly bizarre algorithm for computing modular square roots: Let $x$ be some quadratic residue modulo $p$ for some ...
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RSA with modulus n=p²q

I've been wondering what would happen if the RSA modulus would be $n=p^2q$ instead of $n=pq$. I feel like there is an obvious security flaw (as there is with most modifications). Would this choise of $...
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Which one is fastest? Karatsuba or Montgomery multiplication?

Is there any complexity analysis between Karatsuba and Montgomery multiplication algorithms? It seems that Karatsuba is more general in the sense that is not modulo tuned while Montgomery it is. Does ...
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lcm versus phi in RSA

In textbook RSA, the Euler $\varphi$ function $$\varphi(pq) := (p-1)(q-1)$$ is used to define the private exponent $d$. On the other hand, real-world cryptographic specifications require the ...
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Understanding elliptic curve encryption [closed]

I'm having a hard time understanding the elliptic curve encryption. One thing thing I don't understand is listing all the points on the curve mod p. Suppose I have the following elliptic curve: $y^2 = ...
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Using same modulus for RSA

I know that there exist some attack when using same modulus. Can two different pairs of RSA key have the same modulus? RSA cracking: The same message is sent to two different people problem But ...
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What is the fastest modular reduction algorithm available?

I have been browsing for the fastest and most efficient modular reduction algorithms and came across quite a few. But the one in A Fast Modular Reduction Method (2014) by Zhengjun Cao, Ruizhong Wei ...
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Where does the $\varphi(n)$ part of RSA come from?

$e d \equiv 1 \pmod{\varphi(n)}$ Where does the $\varphi(n)$ part come from? How did the inventors of RSA arrive at $\varphi(n)$?
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How to find generator $g$ in a cyclic group?

As generator $g$ is used in DH how do you find a combination of prime $p$ and $g$? eg: if we choose $p=23$ and its generator is $7$ (given in the book) how do we find the generator?
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Exactly two of the four roots must be greater than N/2

Theorem: Let $y$ be a quadratic residue in $\mathbb{Z}_N$* where $N=pq$. There are exactly four integers $x_1, x_2, x_3, x_4$ where $0 < x_1 < x_2 < \frac{N}{2} < x_3 < x_4 < N$ ...
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268 views

Modular exponentiation on calculator for textbook RSA

How do you encrypt $51$ with public key $(n,e) = (91,23)$ I understand that $c = 51^{23} \bmod 91$. How can I calculate the result on a calculator?
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how to iteratively calculate a^emod n with modulus n sized 4096 bits

In most sites the exponent of the RSA public key is 24 bits. But the modulus can get to 4096 bits size. I have an accelerator that can get max. 2112 bit size modulus. It calculates ...
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If A and B are co-primes, does Ax mod B (where x, any positive int) gives {0,1,2,…,B-1}?

If $A$ and $B$ are co-primes (i.e. $\gcd(A,B)=1$), does $A\cdot x \bmod B$ (where $x\in \mathbb N$) give as result an element of $\{0,1,2,....,B-1\}$ ?
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Solve a Modular Exponentiation

It might be common, but if we had to solve an equation like this $m=s^{e}$ mod $n$ where $m,e,n$ are known. How can we find $s$. What optimisations could be applied? And what would the complexity of ...
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Why does choosing the first coprime e greater than half of φ(n) result in the same d (private exponent)

While reading on RSA's algorithm, I attempted a simplified implementation and noticed the following: When choosing the public exponent $e$, if the value chosen is the first coprime after $φ(n)/2$ ...
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Why does the modulus of Diffie–Hellman need to be a prime?

I read a lot about Diffie-Hellman, but there is one thing I dont understand: why does the modulus p need to be a prime? What if it would not be a prime?
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Why are some x-coordinates unsuitable for an ECDSA generator point?

For Bitcoin's ECDSA curve (secp256k1, where $a=0$, $b=7$), why can't the generator point's first coordinate be $x=0$? That is, the point on the curve would be $(0,y)$ where $y$ satisfies $y^2 = 0^3 + ...
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Pseudocode for constant time modular exponentiation

I'm looking to implement modular exponentiation (for RSA) in constant time, but most of the examples I've found are more mathematical descriptions of the operations. Are there any references with ...
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Calculating $\mathbb F_{p^2}$-rational points of an elliptic curve defined over $\mathbb F_p$

How can I calculate points on an elliptic curve defined over $\mathbb F_p$, for example $y^2 \equiv x^3 + 1 \pmod p$, with coordinates in $\mathbb F_{p^2}$? (points might have complex number format in ...
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Constant time multiplicative inverse within a word

I was playing with an algorithm which at one step, calculated $f(x) = x^{-1} \mod p$ for $0 < x < p = 2^{64}-59$ (note $p$ is a prime). I used Knuth's Vol 2 Algorithm X algorithm for calculating ...
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How is information disclosed by modular multiplication?

Consider the case that $c = a \cdot b \mod p$ where $p$ is a known prime and $0 < a < p$ and $0 < b < p$ are unknown integers numbers. Furthermore, some bits on the value of $c$ are ...
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Avoiding overflow when encrypting with RSA

When encrypting with RSA one calculates $ m^e \pmod n $ by doing the following: m^e % n Where $m$ is what we encrypt. Often $e$ is a very big number to make it ...
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Attack against modular inversion operation using side-channels?

I'm building a device that performs a modular inversions using a secret modulus. I would like to know if it is possible to recover all or part of this modulus by side-channels (timing, power, EMR, etc....
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What is the difference between the standard representants of $\mathbb Z/q\mathbb Z$?

The symbol $\mathbb Z/q\mathbb Z$ (given that $q$ is prime) represents the prime field $\mathbb Z_q$. Basically, the elements of this field are represented by $\{0, 1, \dots, q-1\}$, let's call this ...
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For which RSA moduli, precisely, is $e=d$ for all $e$?

This question shows that there are at least two valid RSA moduli $n$, namely $35$ and $91$, such that for any $e$ coprime to $\lambda(n)$, $$e^2\equiv1\mod\lambda(n)\text.$$ Reading the linked ...
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Do equivalent RSA keys exist?

If $m^{ed} \bmod n = m$ for message $m$, public key $e$ and private key $d$, then adding any integer multiple of $n$ to $m^{ed}$ still equals $m$ modulo $n$. Supposing it exists, how do I find an ...
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How to use the Extended Euclidean algorithm to invert a finite field element?

I was doing some practice on cryptography (I'm new to this topic) and was wondering what the following question even means or what it is asking me to find. I do know how to do Extended Euclidean ...
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Asmuth-Bloom's threshold secret sharing scheme

I was learning Asmuth-Bloom's threshold secret sharing scheme. I was working out an example as given in this Wikipedia article. As per the example, the secret,d is 2, the number of shares, n is 4 and ...
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Reversing DJB2 Hashes

I have some spare time, and a few hundred DJB2-hashed values sitting around. I thought I'd try to do something "useful" and invert DJB2, such that I could calculate the plaintext of the hashes (which ...
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ECDSA: How to retrieve a non-random k

I have a question regarding the random $k$ number of ECDSA encryption. As far as I know, it is possible to retrieve $k$ (and thus the private key) from two signed messages if both used the same $k$. ...
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How to understand RSA Proofs of correctness at Wikipedia

From Wikipedia(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSA_%28cryptosystem%29#Proofs_of_correctness): $m^{ed}$ ≡ $m$ $\pmod{q}$ $m^{ed}$ ≡ $m$ $\pmod{p}$ then $m^{ed}$ ≡ $m$ $\pmod{pq}$ Question: if $m^{ed}$ ...
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Base point in Ed25519?

The paper "High-speed high-security signatures" by Bernstein et al. introduces the Edwards curve Ed25519. Concerning the base point $B$, it says that $B$ is the unique point $(x, 4/5)\in E$ for ...
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How difficult is it to brute force d in RSA: d = (1/e) mod φ in a CPT attack?

Given that RSA key generation works by computing: n = pq φ = (p-1)(q-1) d = (1/e) mod φ If I was an attacker who wanted to brute force d, could I brute force d given just the public key, the ...
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Security concern about reducing hash value using modulo operation

As stated in the title, what I am looking for is information about a "technique" that I would like to use in some of my algorithms. Sometimes I need to map a hash function's result into a range of ...
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RSA: Fermat's Little Theorem and the multiplicative inverse relationship between mod n and mod phi(n)

I'm learning about the proof of the RSA encryption algorithm, and I'm clearly fudging or missing something, because for me it doesn't add up. When generating keys for RSA encryption, we make sure ...
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Decode message $m = p * q$, where $p ^ 5 \bmod N$, $q ^ 5 \bmod N$ and $N$ are known

I been going through some cryptography exercises and stumbled across this problem. Discover message $m$. You know that $m = p * q$. Also $p ^ 5 \bmod N$, $q ^ 5 \bmod N$ and $N$ are known ...
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What happens if no final subtraction is done in Montgomery multiplication?

I'm doing Montgomery arithmetic modulo $N = 2^{255}-19$ for the Curve25519, picking $R = 2^{256}$ for Montgomery. After multiplying two numbers $0 \leq A,B < N$ in the Montgomery representation ...
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Is there any alternative for extended euclidean algorithm to perform modulo division?

I'm implementing point addition and point doubling operations for elliptic curve cryptography. I have implemented extended euclidean algorithm to perform modulo division. It appears the that ...
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How does $g$ being a generator imply Diffie-Hellman's correctness?

In the Diffie-Hellman protocol for key exchange over an unsecured channel, we choose $p$ and $g$, where $g$ is a generator of $\mathbf{Z}_p^*$. However I want to know why this assumption makes the ...
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In RSA, why does $p$ have to be bigger than $q$ where $n=p \times q$?

In openSSL – during RSA key generation – if $q$ is bigger than $p$, they exchange them. Why is that?