A variant of RSA where the modulus is the product of more than two primes.

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Subverting the key generation step in RSA public key cryptography

I am interested in the ways the implementation of an RSA key generation implementation can or cannot be subverted so that the subverter has an advantage, but the owner of the key, and the people who ...
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4answers
535 views

RSA with composite numbers

It has been said that RSA uses a modulus product of two prime numbers for security reasons. But does RSA even work correctly if we allow composite integers instead? I think that the answer is "NO". ...
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2answers
283 views

Multiple-prime RSA; how many primes can I use, for a 2048-bit modulus?

In standard RSA, the modulus $n=p_1 p_2$ is a product of two primes $p_1,p_2$ of the same size. Suppose we construct the modulus as a product of multiple primes $p_1,\dots,p_k$, i.e., $n=p_1 p_2 ...
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2answers
1k views

Are there any standards of multi-prime RSA key generation?

FIPS 186-3 specifies a method to generate DSA parameters. Is there anything similar (official standard or widely-accepted recommendation) that shows how to generate the primes for multi-prime RSA?
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1answer
320 views

RSA with modulus product of many primes

I would like to ask what happens if we build an RSA system with modulus a product of more than 2 primes, for example let $n=p_{1}p_{2}...p_{L}$. I know only the classical RSA system with $n=pq$ with ...
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Who first published the interest of more than two prime factors in RSA?

Multi-prime RSA is now a well known technique: it uses $k>2$ distinct secret prime factors in the public RSA modulus, with the advantage that, using the CRT, we can gain a speed boost in ...