Multi-party computation (MPC) allows a set of parties, each with a private input, to securely and jointly perform any computation over their inputs.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

10
votes
0answers
256 views

Shared secret: Generating Random Permutation

-- or: How to Play Poker Without a Dealer I know this question is long but it's a really interesting theoretical problem about shared secrets and multi-party computation. General Problem: "Shared ...
2
votes
0answers
49 views

Where can I find source code of a compiler that secures a circuit (or attemps to)?

In the paper “Multiparty Computation Secure Against Continual Memory Leakage”, on page 1239 under section “Using an LDS Compiler Instead of OCL Compiler”, the authors discuss why they decided to use ...
2
votes
0answers
70 views

How do you distribute secret shares without knowing who to first distribute them to?

Figure 1 on page 1249 of the “Multiparty Computation Secure Against Continual Memory Leakage” paper shows $m$ committees are elected in step 1 and then later in step 3 are each given a secret share. ...
1
vote
0answers
74 views

Why do authors execute a leakage resilient election protocol inside a leak-free phase?

In the paper "Multiparty Computation Secure Against Continual Memory Leakage", on page 1241 (that's page 7 of the PDF) under section 2.3, the authors discuss "The Election Protocol" that they use to ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Can you clarify the proof that secure LR-two party protocols do not exist?

In the paper “Multiparty Computation Secure Against Continual Memory Leakage” on pg. 1237, the footnote #1 discuss why it is not possible to construct a leakage resilient two-party protocol. But I'm ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Why does a joint leakage MPC protocol not directly apply to a disjoint leakage requirement?

In the paper "Multiparty Computation Secure Against Continual Memory Leakage" on pg. 1239 the footnote at the bottom points out the difference between $joint$ leakage and $disjoint$ leakage. The ...