Tagged Questions

PKI is short for Public Key Infrastructure. The foundation of a PKI is the certificate authority (CA), which issues digital certificates that authenticate the identity of organizations and individuals over a public system such as the Internet.

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2answers
101 views

ECDH anonymous key exchange to avoid PKI

I want to use TLS to encrypt the communication between peers in a P2P network. Each peer has a well known 256bit peer identifier (the public key of a 256bit elliptic curve keypair). Both peers need ...
1
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1answer
44 views

How is an X.509 public key used for TLS?

Wikipedia's TLS article says: The client responds with a ClientKeyExchange message, which may contain a PreMasterSecret, public key, or nothing. (Again, this depends on the selected cipher.) This ...
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0answers
39 views

Does RSA work properly with non prime factors? [duplicate]

I know RSA should not use non prime factors for p and q for security reasons, but still, just out of curiosity, will RSA work 100% accurately i.e. message encrypted with one of the key produces same ...
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1answer
62 views

x509 CA trust question

I'm trying to understand the logic of CAs, trust and client certificates. I have a general understanding but am having a tough time bridging some gaps. In a hypothetical situation a software system ...
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0answers
84 views

Any field in a PKI certificate where some text info can be stored?

I want to store 5-10 lines of Text Info in a PKI Certificate. All I want is that when using common tools like openssl command line or certutil from Microsoft, this text info should be displayed as is. ...
2
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1answer
167 views

what's the advantages of identity-based systems over certificate-based ones?

Actually, I'm not familiar to how identity-based and certificate-based systems work, so ,can anyone give me a detail and comprehensive answer to this question? Moreover, in what environments the ...
3
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2answers
109 views

What's the alternative should PKI collapse?

Premises - please check it and critique if necessary: If factoring the products of large numbers suddenly becomes simple, PKI goes up in smoke. Is this correct? If it is correct, it seems to me ...
4
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1answer
72 views

Why are security against eavesdropping and security against CPA equivalent in the setting of public-key cryptography?

Why are security against eavesdropping and security against CPA equivalent in the setting of public-key cryptography?
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0answers
89 views

Could MITM securely identify identity?

Consider protocol like QUIC or MinimaLT which are essentially layer4 replacement for TCP/UDP (riding on top of UDP currently because of fear of random firewalls dropping new L4 protocol). From crypto ...
2
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2answers
939 views

What happens when a root CA has its private key compromised?

What happens when a root CA has its private key compromised? Then all children in the tree are compromised too? And then all certificates are compromised? What needs to happen then? Related: - How ...
0
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1answer
164 views

I've got my private key compromised. How does CRL work?

How does certificate revocation list (CRL) work? How can I send a request to the CA to add my current private key to the CRL, so no one except me can add my certificate to the CRL? Related: - How can ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

How can we get CA's public key?

To get a public key of some organization or someone we want to send an encrypted message to, we need to make a request to CA asking that organization's public key. CA then returns X509 certificate. It ...
4
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3answers
351 views

Can we design a public-key infrastructure without certificate authorities?

In a recent essay, Bruce Schneier tasks the engineering community with redesigning and rebuilding the vulnerable parts of the Internet's backbone. We need to figure out how to re-engineer the ...
2
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2answers
149 views

Security of S/MIME in case of CA compromise

Suppose Alice and Bob are exchanging messages using S/MIME, protected by certificates that have been issued by either the same CA or by two mutually independent CAs. There exists an adversary Mallory ...
0
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2answers
117 views

Why do PKI schemes need security proofs? [closed]

When it comes to designing new PKI-based key-exchange protocols, why are security proofs needed? Without them, can we show a protocol's security? Does there exist a PKI-based key-exchange protocol ...
2
votes
1answer
722 views

Creating a PKCS#12 file where public key doesn't match the private key

For testing purpose, I want to create a PKCS#12 file in which the private key doesn't match the certificate. Is there any tool which will help me do this? If I use ...
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0answers
67 views

Are ePassports still vulnerable?

Jeroen van der Beek presented a flaw in the ePassports in 2008. What is the state of this flaw still in 2013? ...
4
votes
2answers
553 views

uniqueness of the RSA public modulus

What is the probability that two separate RSA public moduli are the same? For example, consider a 2048-bit modulus. The number seems to be huge, but the choice for prime factors p and q is much more ...
1
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1answer
139 views

which asymmetric cipher provide highest performance?

to get highest performance Which asymmetric cipher provide fastest encryption/decryption ? ECC or DH ? what key size is recommended today ?
3
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2answers
309 views

Crypto USB Devices - where is the PIN/Password stored?

I am currently looking at the security of cryto USB drives for storing x509 certificates. I have one in possession currently. It can be read/written to using the Microsoft Crypto APIs. Anytime one ...
2
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0answers
348 views

Determining the algorithm used to generate a digital signature

I have a string "abcd pqrs". This string is digitally signed with an X.509 certificate (with its private key) and it produces a signature. From the signed string, is it possible to find out what ...
-2
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1answer
379 views

Encrypting with private key in Public Key InfraStructure [closed]

In Public key infrastructure, the MD5 of a piece of data is encrypted with the private key of a sender and this encrypted MD5 – along with the data – is again encrypted using an algorithm like AES or ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Is 512-bit RSA still safe for signature generation?

The standard CSP on Windows XP only supports RSA up to 512-bit, which means that it's the maximum key size I can use for authenticity verification of updates. The public key is embedded in the ...
3
votes
3answers
446 views

How to avoid a chicken and egg scenario with encrypting passwords?

I am working on application that allows users to upload files containing company data and then share those files with a list of other users that have specific roles within the system. I want to ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Design question for a service that signs messages on behalf of a user

I'm working on a messaging service that lets users author messages and have them signed with an RSA key. The key is used for identity purposes only and can be revoked, so compromising the private key ...
2
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0answers
59 views

Are there any systems like SDSI / SPKI that are currently being developed?

SPKI / SDSI look interesting but appear to have fizzled out and died. Are there any modern competitors?