Cryptography that will remain secure should large-scale quantum computing become feasible. Based on hard problems with no known polynomial-time quantum algorithm (e.g., Shor's algorithm).

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35
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11answers
8k views

Now that quantum computers have been out for a while, has RSA been cracked?

D-wave systems has released a commercially viable quantum computer. This means in theory, that all asymmetric encryption algorithms — such as RSA — are now useless due to the speed at which quantum ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

How will Cryptography be changed by Quantum Computing?

I realise this isn't a 'yes or no' question, and I apologise for asking something that could be seen as a discussion thread, but I had to ask. I'm currently doing an EPQ in CS (specifically how QC ...
18
votes
5answers
3k views

What is the post-quantum cryptography alternative to Diffie-Hellman?

Post-quantum cryptography concentrates on cryptographic algorithms that remain secure in the face of large scale quantum computers. In general, the main focus seems to be on public-key encryption ...
13
votes
3answers
932 views

What exactly is the impact of the hidden subgroup problem on cryptography?

I understand my group theory (allegedly), so I can make partial sense of The Hidden Subgroup problem: Given a group $G$, a subgroup $H \leq G$, and a set $X$, we say a function $f : G \Rightarrow ...
10
votes
3answers
715 views

Is key size the only barrier to the adoption of the McEliece cryptosystem, or is it considered broken/potentially vulnerable?

A recent paper showed that the McEliece cryptosystem is not, unlike RSA and other cryptosystems, weakened as drastically by quantum computing because strong Fourier sampling cannot solve the hidden ...
9
votes
1answer
192 views

Can Grover's algorithm be parallelized?

Using a quantum computer, Grover's algorithm can search an unordered list of length $N$ in time $\sqrt{N}$. Applied to cryptography this means that it can recover $n$ bit keys and find preimages for $...
11
votes
1answer
5k views

Is AES-256 a post-quantum secure cipher or not?

We know Grover's algorithm speedup brute-force attacks two time faster in block ciphers (e.g brute-forcing 128 bit keys take $2^{64}$ operations not $2^{128}$). That explains why we are using 256 bit ...
7
votes
1answer
5k views

How long does it take a quantum computer to brute force AES?

I understand that using Grover's algorithm it only requires $2^{64}$ lookups for a 128 bit AES encryption, leading people to say we need to increase to 256 bit keys. But how long would it actually ...
5
votes
1answer
662 views

For a one-time pad, which MAC method is information-theoretically secure?

In the the main post about MAC methods it mentions a few methods: Authenticate And Encrypt: The sender computes a MAC of the plaintext, encrypts the plaintext, and then appends the MAC to the ...
2
votes
1answer
598 views

using Post-quantum asymmetric ciphers instead of RSA

We can't trust RSA to encrypt our Emails so what is best post-quantum cryptography system as alternative for RSA which provide good security and don't be breakable? because McEliece cryptosystem looks ...
13
votes
2answers
620 views

Is braid-based cryptography proven insecure when looking towards post-quantum cryptography?

Braid groups has drawn the attention of cryptographers for a few years, as a promising platform for post-quantum cryptographic protocols. The security of the proposed schemes mostly relied on ...
15
votes
4answers
1k views

What security do Cryptographic Sponges offer against generic quantum attacks?

In the face of non-quantum attacker, Keccak[r=1088,c=512] with 512 bits of output provides: Collision resistance up to $2^{256}$ operations Preimage resistance up to $2^{256}$ operations Second ...
21
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1answer
1k views

Proof for the SHA3 claim that 256 bit security is “post-quantum sufficient”?

On page 14 of "Keccak and the SHA-3 Standardization" (February 6, 2013) it says: Instantiation of a sponge function the permutation KECCAK-f 7 permutations: b → {25,50,100,200,400,800,...
14
votes
1answer
4k views

Assuming a 1024qb quantum computer, how long to brute force 1024bit RSA, 256bit AES and 512bit SHA512

Assuming in the future there was a functioning 1024 qubit quantum supercomputer and it could run Shor's algorithm or Grover's algorithm to crack encryption very quickly. I'm interested in how the ...
7
votes
1answer
234 views

How many qubits are required to break RSA 2048 or 4096 with a universal quantum computer?

So in the news this week, IBM have created a universal quantum computer with 5 fully functional qubits. Logic and Moore's law dictates they will be able to scale this up to a lot more qubits within a ...
3
votes
2answers
392 views

Are hash trees an alternative, quantum-resistant signature scheme which can replace RSA?

Can hash trees provide quantum resistant signatures to replace RSA for signing securely? What is the key size and how many times can we use same key?
4
votes
1answer
650 views

Implementations of Ntru TLS

Has anyone come across any implementations of Ntru TLS? I'm working a project for uni that does quantum secure encryption. It relies on a mix of Ntru & AES, but I can't find an implementation of ...
4
votes
1answer
170 views

How to generate a bilinear group of prime order p for key generation

I am trying to implement an IEEE Paper In Cryptography. I read many reference regarding an RSA key generation. But i am confused with above statement. Please someone explain me What it says with ...
4
votes
2answers
80 views

Is there a partially homomorphic quantum secure public key cryptosystem with IND-CCA1 security?

I recentely asked "IND-CCA1 RSA padding?" about whether there is a IND-CCA1 secure variant of RSA. The original version of the question also allowed usage of ECC which would allow usage of ElGamal, ...
8
votes
2answers
140 views

SAT-Based Public Key Cryptosystem

I am researching post quantum cryptography and I've stumbled upon this article which presents a PKC with an np-complete (SAT) trapdoor. I was wondering if someone could help me understand the way the ...
7
votes
1answer
247 views

Is full Homomorphic encryption quantum resistant?

Since most of our asymmetric encryption algorithms are going to be out-of-date in a couple of year due to Shor's algorithm, I was wondering about the future of FHE schemes. I have found this paper, ...
3
votes
2answers
138 views

Small Quantum Signatures - Reality check needed

I've been thinking a bit lately about how to get quantum resistant signatures fast and (relatively) small. One idea I've been keen on exploring is finding a crypto PRNG that allows fast-forwarding, e....
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Using one-way hash functions as the encryption method

Suppose two parties want to communicate securely with each other (Bob and Alice) using a simple messaging system in English. There are approximately 180,000 currently used words in the English ...
0
votes
0answers
128 views

Preventing Quantum Attacks on Cryptography [duplicate]

With the advancement of technology in quantum computing, it's becoming more evident that we need to start thinking about protecting the future integrity of our cryptographic standards. What can we do ...