Cryptography that will remain secure should large-scale quantum computing become feasible. Based on hard problems with no known polynomial-time quantum algorithm (e.g., Shor's algorithm).

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Now that quantum computers have been out for a while, has RSA been cracked?

D-wave systems has released a commercially viable quantum computer. This means in theory, that all asymmetric encryption algorithms — such as RSA — are now useless due to the speed at which quantum ...
21
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1answer
789 views

Proof for the SHA3 claim that 256 bit security is “post-quantum sufficient”?

On page 14 of "Keccak and the SHA-3 Standardization" (February 6, 2013) it says: Instantiation of a sponge function the permutation KECCAK-f 7 permutations: b → ...
17
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5answers
3k views

What is the post-quantum cryptography alternative to Diffie-Hellman?

Post-quantum cryptography concentrates on cryptographic algorithms that remain secure in the face of large scale quantum computers. In general, the main focus seems to be on public-key encryption ...
14
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4answers
1k views

What security do Cryptographic Sponges offer against generic quantum attacks?

In the face of non-quantum attacker, Keccak[r=1088,c=512] with 512 bits of output provides: Collision resistance up to $2^{256}$ operations Preimage resistance up to $2^{256}$ operations Second ...
14
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1answer
4k views

Assuming a 1024qb quantum computer, how long to brute force 1024bit RSA, 256bit AES and 512bit SHA512

Assuming in the future there was a functioning 1024 qubit quantum supercomputer and it could run Shor's algorithm or Grover's algorithm to crack encryption very quickly. I'm interested in how the ...
13
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3answers
903 views

What exactly is the impact of the hidden subgroup problem on cryptography?

I understand my group theory (allegedly), so I can make partial sense of The Hidden Subgroup problem: Given a group $G$, a subgroup $H \leq G$, and a set $X$, we say a function $f : G \Rightarrow ...
13
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1answer
187 views

How is “post-quantum security” proven/shown?

Due to growing concerns over the threat of quantum computing to asymmetric cryptography (RSA, ECC, etc), a number of "quantum resistant" replacements have been proposed (SPHINCS, McBits, and many ...
12
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1answer
501 views

How dead is braid based cryptography

Braid groups has drawn the attention of cryptographers for a few years, as a promising platform for post-quantum cryptographic protocols. The security of the proposed schemes mostly relied on ...
11
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3answers
2k views

McEliece Cryptosystem Implementations

Are there any current implementations (language irrelevant) of the McEliece Cryptosystem? I have been hunting around all day, and yet, have only found a few mathematical equations pertaining to the ...
11
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1answer
4k views

Is AES-256 a post-quantum secure cipher or not?

We know Grover's algorithm speedup brute-force attacks two time faster in block ciphers (e.g brute-forcing 128 bit keys take $2^{64}$ operations not $2^{128}$). That explains why we are using 256 bit ...
10
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3answers
706 views

Is key size the only barrier to the adoption of the McEliece cryptosystem, or is it considered broken/potentially vulnerable?

A recent paper showed that the McEliece cryptosystem is not, unlike RSA and other cryptosystems, weakened as drastically by quantum computing because strong Fourier sampling cannot solve the hidden ...
10
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3answers
2k views

How will Cryptography be changed by Quantum Computing?

I realise this isn't a 'yes or no' question, and I apologise for asking something that could be seen as a discussion thread, but I had to ask. I'm currently doing an EPQ in CS (specifically how QC ...
9
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1answer
186 views

Can Grover's algorithm be parallelized?

Using a quantum computer, Grover's algorithm can search an unordered list of length $N$ in time $\sqrt{N}$. Applied to cryptography this means that it can recover $n$ bit keys and find preimages for ...
8
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1answer
279 views

Quantum on hash

Perhaps this has been answered before. Grover's algorithm should result in a 256 bit hash being complexity 128 bits to crack. I was wondering, what if you had a 512 bit hash , and xor'd the lower 256 ...
8
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1answer
468 views

Did NIST verify “post-quantum” claims in the SHA3 proposal papers?

I have been reading Bernstein’s “Quantum attacks against Blue Midnight Wish, ECHO, Fugue, Grøstl, Hamsi, JH, Keccak, Shabal, SHAvite-3, SIMD, and Skein” paper from 2010… This document disproves ...
8
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1answer
175 views

Is the Couvreur et al. polynomial time attack on McEliece practical?

There's a new e-print out on arXiv titled "A Polynomial Time Attack against Algebraic Geometry Code Based Public Key Cryptosystems" by Alain Couvreur, Irene Márquez-Corbella and Ruud Pellikaan: ...
7
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1answer
225 views

Is full Homomorphic encryption quantum resistant?

Since most of our asymmetric encryption algorithms are going to be out-of-date in a couple of year due to Shor's algorithm, I was wondering about the future of FHE schemes. I have found this paper, ...
7
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1answer
207 views

Is the “New Hope” Lattice Key Exchange vulnerable to a lattice analog of the Bernstein BADA55 Attack?

In the paper, "Post Quantum Key Exhange - A New Hope," the authors present a lattice-based key exchange based on the work of Chris Peikert. In this "New Hope" key exchange the authors try to gain ...
6
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1answer
220 views

Secure, patent-free alternative to NTRU

I'm working on a P2P communications and chat framework, and am looking for a quantum-secure asymmetric key exchange algorithm which I can use to perform a key exchange of an AES-256 bit key. This is ...
6
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1answer
393 views

What does “a 15360-bit RSA key is the equivalent to a 256-bit symmetric key” mean?

NIST key management guidelines suggest that 15360-bit RSA keys are equivalent in strength to 256-bit symmetric keys. If a 15360-bit RSA key is the equivalent to a 256-bit symmetric key, does that mean ...
6
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1answer
4k views

How long does it take a quantum computer to brute force AES?

I understand that using Grover's algorithm it only requires $2^{64}$ lookups for a 128 bit AES encryption, leading people to say we need to increase to 256 bit keys. But how long would it actually ...
6
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1answer
83 views

Are CSPRNGs quantum-resistant?

It's fairly well known that Shor's algorithm kills RSA, DSA, ECDSA, DH, ... and that symmetric ciphers (AES and 3DES) and hashes (SHA-2, SHA-3) are safe as long as you double your key size / output ...
5
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1answer
621 views

For a one-time pad, which MAC method is information-theoretically secure?

In the the main post about MAC methods it mentions a few methods: Authenticate And Encrypt: The sender computes a MAC of the plaintext, encrypts the plaintext, and then appends the MAC to the ...
5
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2answers
153 views

post-quantum threshold secret sharing

I am looking for a references for post-quantum threshold secret sharing schemes. I am especially interested in knowing whether any one based on one-way compressor functions or cryptographic hashes ...
5
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1answer
165 views

How many qubits are required to break RSA 2048 or 4096 with a universal quantum computer?

So in the news this week, IBM have created a universal quantum computer with 5 fully functional qubits. Logic and Moore's law dictates they will be able to scale this up to a lot more qubits within a ...
5
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1answer
183 views

Is SRP post-quantum secure?

Is SRP-6a post-quantum secure? If it is not post-quantum secure, do any post-quantum secure alternatives similar to SRP-6a exist?
5
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2answers
411 views

Is there any research about cryptography on nondeterministic Turing machines?

I know it's a highly theoretical topic, but I was wondering if there was any research out there about what cryptography would be like assuming that we had access to nondeterministic Turing machines. ...
5
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1answer
157 views

McEliece and cryptanalysis

What is the computational time to break McEliece on a quantum computer? I've seen that polynomial time algorithms exist, but for special conditions. What about the general case?
5
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3answers
502 views

Stateless hash based public key cryptography?

Merkle-Winternitz signatures based on fractal hash trees are an attractive alternative to other post-quantum cryptographic schemes, in particular since they are conceptually simple, the security ...
5
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1answer
147 views

Using encryption schemes for identification

I've been researching how to implement a post-quantum SSL-like connection authentication, especially correct identification&authentization of the server/client. Because good post-quantum digital ...
5
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2answers
199 views

Finding the subgroup in isogeny-based cryptography

Isogeny-based cryptography is one of the newest post-quantum cryptography. Hardness of this system is based on finding isogeny between two elliptic curves. Also this is theorem: Elliptic curves ...
4
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4answers
702 views

Alternative to NSA encryption algorithm

I am looking for a strong alternative to elliptic curve cryptography. It should be something that could face quantum computing attacks, but nothing created by the NSA. I heard about isogeny key ...
4
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1answer
230 views

Are post-quantum cryptographic ciphers *also* secure if the P=NP conjecture holds true?

First of all, I only understand the P versus NP debate on a rather shallow level as I am not a computer scientist. So perhaps the answer to the question is straightforward but if not, I would be ...
4
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2answers
192 views

Merkle Tree High Tree

I'm reading Merkle tree signatures and I like know if the security of the that scheme depends, also, of the high of the tree or only depends that hash function is resistant to collision?
4
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2answers
234 views

Can Grover's Algorithm be combined with a meet-in-the-middle attack?

We all know and love the meet-in-the-middle attack which basically makes double encryption pointless using a time-memory-tradeoff. Now there was recently the recommendation by the NSA to use double ...
4
votes
1answer
261 views

Long-term data protection, storage of old encrypted traffic and quantum cryptocalipse

Tony Arcieri makes an interesting point in his Imperfect Forward Secrecy article which basically boils down to: large entities such as NSA are storing encrypted internet traffic, also what's to stop ...
4
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1answer
248 views

McEliece information set decoding attack vulnerability

Wikipedia states that McEliece is open to "information set decoding attack". What is an "information set decoding attack" and how serious is the vulnerability? (is it just a matter of choosing proper ...
4
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2answers
74 views

Is there a partially homomorphic quantum secure public key cryptosystem with IND-CCA1 security?

I recentely asked "IND-CCA1 RSA padding?" about whether there is a IND-CCA1 secure variant of RSA. The original version of the question also allowed usage of ECC which would allow usage of ElGamal, ...
4
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1answer
219 views

Which MAC scheme is quantum resistant?

will HMAC survive Grover algorithm ? if not then which MAC scheme provide post-quantum security ?
4
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1answer
625 views

Implementations of Ntru TLS

Has anyone come across any implementations of Ntru TLS? I'm working a project for uni that does quantum secure encryption. It relies on a mix of Ntru & AES, but I can't find an implementation of ...
4
votes
1answer
49 views

How is McEliece chosen plaintext secure?

Suppose a challenger creates a McEliece encryption system where there is a public key consisting of a matrix $G$ representing some linear code, and a number $t$ for the number of errors. Then the ...
4
votes
1answer
287 views

Does Grover's algorithm effect block size or only key size?

We know that Grover's algorithm can speed up cracking symmetric keys. Basically the key space is halved. This means we have to use at least a 256 bit key (to get 128 bit security). I heard somewhere ...
4
votes
1answer
168 views

How to generate a bilinear group of prime order p for key generation

I am trying to implement an IEEE Paper In Cryptography. I read many reference regarding an RSA key generation. But i am confused with above statement. Please someone explain me What it says with ...
4
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1answer
154 views

Quantum computing vs AES s-box equation

Do quantum computers have any affect on the ability to solve the non-linear AES s-box algebraic expression, or does solving it still fall under search algorithms (Grover's)? If quantum computer do ...
4
votes
1answer
149 views

Deterministic Rand function for Winternitz One Time Signatures

Suppose you are implementing a Generalized Merkle Signature Scheme, using the Winternitz One-Time Signature Scheme for the node signatures. Furthermore, suppose the implementation is to be stateless ...
4
votes
0answers
74 views

Secure entropy extractor for thermal noise collected from camera input?

I have read this paper (pdf) which talks about measuring the entropy of thermal noise collected from camera input. They estimate the minimum entropy at about 4 bits per pixel. Probably estimating 1 ...
3
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2answers
262 views

Which elliptic curves are quantum resistant? [closed]

If I want to learn about quantum resistant crytography what are the best resources? Which type of elliptic curves should I be studying?
3
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2answers
130 views

Small Quantum Signatures - Reality check needed

I've been thinking a bit lately about how to get quantum resistant signatures fast and (relatively) small. One idea I've been keen on exploring is finding a crypto PRNG that allows fast-forwarding, ...
3
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2answers
313 views

Public-key cryptosystems without poly-time quantum attacks

It's well-known that Shor's algorithm can solve integer factorization, discrete logarithm and discrete log over elliptic curves in cubic time. This implies that cryptosystems like RSA, ElGamal, and ...
3
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3answers
346 views

Can one use a Cryptographic Accumulator to efficiently store Lamport public keys without the need of a Merkle Tree?

One of the problems of one-time Lamport signatures is that public keys are disposed after use, so you must generate many keys and store them in a Merkle tree. The root is the "real" public key and ...