Design of cryptographic protocols, i.e. ways of using algorithms (primitives) to achieve one or more security goals like integrity, confidentiality, authenticity (maybe together with non-security-related goals). If you ask about a specific protocol, tag with its name instead (or additionally, if ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
2answers
92 views

Sender and receiver having different moduli conflicts with encryption and signing in RSA

I should implement a security protocol as a part of which I need to: Encrypt the message with receiver public key. Sign it with my private key. Send it to receiver. Suppose that the system uses a ...
5
votes
1answer
144 views

Universal Circuits in Indistinguishability Obfuscation Candidate Construction

I am currently working on an implementation of the candidate construction for an indistinguishability obfuscator that was recently proposed by Garg et al. The relevant paper can be found here. ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

Are formal methods used for cryptographic protocol design?

I decided to learn more about the application of formal methods to cryptographic protocols and found this interesting talk by Cathy Meadows at YouTube. After doing research about how people are using ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Use additional keys to thwart key compromise?

Is it good or bad practice to design crypto protocols for key compromise by using additional keys? Argument for bad practice would be: When you have a key you should trust it and not throw more keys ...
5
votes
1answer
336 views

Is it a requirement to understand mathematics when implementing (or breaking) cryptography?

Related: What is the lowest level of mathematics required in order to understand how encryption algorithms work? and Recommended skills for a job in cryptology In the context of putting crypto into ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

Common pitfalls of session key activation?

Assume that initiator $I$ and responder $R$ of a key agreement protocol have agreed on new symmetric session keys $K'_{auth}$ and $K'_{enc}$, e.g. by way of Diffie-Hellman and key derivation, possibly ...
14
votes
4answers
2k views

Why is plain-hash-then-encrypt not a secure MAC?

It seems that even in MAC-then-encrypt systems like SSL, something like HMAC is used rather than a plain hash. Why? Suppose we use some stream cipher; then why can't we use $Encrypt(m | H(m))$ as ...
3
votes
1answer
98 views

Need to generate new DH keys for every message in OTR

Going through the OTR specification I don't quite get why a new DH keys (and hence new symmetric key and hmac key) are generated for each message to be sent. Why is this necessary? I don't think it ...
3
votes
3answers
221 views

Does ECIES imply authenticity?

Assume: Alice and Bob both generate separate EC keypairs Alice obtains Bob's public key, and together with her private key creates a shared secret key Alice encrypts a message using the shared key ...
1
vote
2answers
138 views

What are the major flaws and limitations of this hash-based stream cipher design?

K is a 224-bit key. C is a 32-bit counter; it is publicly known. the same value is never used twice. ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

How does this SSL-related flaw work?

I just saw a video at CNN in which it is claimed that, if the server isn't generating a random public key, the server can be hacked. First how HTTPS works… to be sure I’m on the same page: Server ...
2
votes
1answer
217 views

How is padding oracle attack mitigated by encrypt-then-MAC?

Let us suppose Alice sends a message to Bob. As far as I know, the most popular scheme of MAC-then-encrypt is as follows: Alice computes the HMAC of the plaintext using her private key, and then ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Is container format relevant to security of encrypted message inside?

Still trying to design a fully binary cryptography container format for my mobile app, I am here asking if container is ever relevant. Thanks to Apple, I cannot use GPG directly because I can neither ...
2
votes
2answers
199 views

Zero-knowledge proof of a product

I have non-negative integers $x,y,z$. I'm going to give you commitments $C(x),C(y),C(z)$ to them. Then, I would like to prove in zero knowledge that $xy=z$. I can choose the commitment scheme to ...