0
votes
1answer
45 views

Ensuring that an operation takes a relatively specific amount of time, but easily verify the result

I want an algorithm of some sort that can ensure that an operation takes a fairly specific amount of time, but proof that this operation was done can be completed relatively inexpensively. For ...
0
votes
0answers
126 views

If H(m) = 0 for some m, how can a DSA signature be forged?

If we know for some message $m$ that $H(m) = 0$, how can we forge a DSA signature with only the public key? I got that $g^s*r = (g^x)^r$ where $x$ is the private key, but that's one equation with 2 ...
2
votes
2answers
145 views

Publicly exposed hash of private key

Would exposing a cryptographic hash function's digest (e.g. SHA-3) of RSA private key data compromise the key? If so, what are the possible (cryptanalysis-) vectors for attacking the key if an ...
-1
votes
1answer
71 views

Is size Q equal to size SHA(Q)? [closed]

Assume d is a 128 bit random integer and P is base point of an elliptic curve and Q = dP is a point on the elliptic curve and SHA is a hash function with 128 bit output, my question is: Is size Q ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

“proof of access” schemes

What is the state of the art way when implementing a scheme challenging a party to prove they have access to certain data? What I'm looking for something along the lines of Give them ...
1
vote
1answer
313 views

When making public key fingerprints - is a sha1 hash still a good idea?

I'm thinking about trying to save some space (and readability) when referencing 2k and 4k public keys (millions of them) by storing the fingerprint in some places instead of the full public key. ...
2
votes
1answer
155 views

How can a key pair be derived from an arbitrary hash?

If I correctly understand the concept of a "brain wallet" in BitCoin, you start with a passphrase, generate the hash of the passphrase, then somehow derive a public / private key from that to use as ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference between symmetric and asymmetric hash function?

The Linux kernel supports symmetric and asymmetric hash functions. E.g. sha1, sha256, ... See tcrypt.c and search for test_hash_speed and ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

How are timestamps verified?

You put an input and the hash value comes as an output then when someone puts the input the hash function it is applied to see if it is the same hash original value is stored in some database , that ...
8
votes
1answer
459 views

Compressing EC private keys

For reasonable security, EC private keys are typically 256-bits. Shorter EC private keys are not sufficiently secure. However, shorter symmetric keys (128-bits, for example) are comparably secure. I ...
3
votes
1answer
206 views

A set of key pairs and one hash to secure them

I have a simple problem: I have a set of users' ECDSA key pairs, and say I want to encrypt them with a simple algorithm. I have access to one variable that uniquely identifies the user, so I hash it ...