An asymmetric cipher is an encryption scheme using a pair of keys, one to encrypt and a second to decrypt a message. A special class of asymmetric ciphers are public-key ciphers, in which the encrypting key need not be kept secret to ensure a private communication.

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Proof of Communication

I desire an algorithm in which Alice sends a block of data $X$ to Bob, with proof that the data was both sent and received. Ideally this would take the form of a public-key signature of the block $X$ ...
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public key delivery without third party

I am currently working on an anonymous P2P file sharing application and I am elaborating some already existing solutions. Some of them allegedly provide point-to-point encryption using RSA ...
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Multi-key decryption

Let's assume I want to send a secret message to $N$ recipients in an asymmetric way. My message could be encrypted with $N$ different public keys $p_i$ one after another and send to each user ...
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Discovering private exponent from public key

I'm going to assume this isn't possible, but I have to ask because I'm trying to fundamentally understand what I've thus far been trying to implement by following an RFC. SRP-6a starts off with ...
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Given a 'good' basis for a lattice, how can we solve the CVP?

I'm doing a little bit of reading about lattices. I read that if we can find a 'short' basis for our given lattice, we can solve CVP and SVP very efficiently. However, the paper didn't describe an ...
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Challenge-response based on public-key decryption, why send public key

Quoting the handbook of applied cryptography, chapter 10.3.3 (i): Identification based on PK decryption and witness. Consider the following protocol: $A \leftarrow B: h(r), B, P_A(r,B)$ ...
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Public key Issue - same key pair as existing one? [duplicate]

My question is a bit naive, but what if someone generates the same RSA key pair as someone else? This person would have the same private key and so would be able to decrypt messages not intended to ...
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The modulus of RSA public key

I am studying the RSA cryptosystem. The public key consists of $(n, e)$, the modulus (product of two large primes), and the encryption exponent. I want to separate the modulus $n$ and exponent $e$. A ...