6
votes
1answer
2k views

How long does it take a quantum computer to brute force AES?

I understand that using Grover's algorithm it only requires $2^{64}$ lookups for a 128 bit AES encryption, leading people to say we need to increase to 256 bit keys. But how long would it actually ...
15
votes
1answer
456 views

What exactly is the base for the KECCAK (SHA3) claim that a security strength of 256 bits is “post-quantum sufficient”?

On page 14 of "Keccak and the SHA-3 Standardization" (February 6, 2013) it says: Instantiation of a sponge function the permutation KECCAK-f 7 permutations: b → ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Assuming a 1024qb quantum computer, how long to brute force 1024bit RSA, 256bit AES and 512bit SHA512

Assuming in the future there was a functioning 1024 qubit quantum supercomputer and it could run Shor's algorithm or Grover's algorithm to crack encryption very quickly. I'm interested in how the ...
-1
votes
1answer
667 views

University for Crypto grad study [closed]

(I thought twice before asking this question and quite reluctant to type as well, but I think this would be helpful). I am an undergrad student and choose theoretical computer science as my major. ...
3
votes
1answer
310 views

Implementations of Ntru TLS

I posted this in a reply to What is the post-quantum cryptography alternative to Diffie-Hellman? but since it's actually another question, it was deleted. Has anyone come across any implementations ...
1
vote
1answer
248 views

What are some different cryptography methods?

Some of the most effective cryptography methods and algorithms are based of factoring large prime numbers (e.g. RSA). I'm curious whether there are some other cryptography methods. Somethings that is ...
28
votes
10answers
5k views

Now that quantum computers have been out for a while, has RSA been cracked?

D-wave systems has released a commercially viable quantum computer. This means in theory, that all asymmetric encryption algorithms — such as RSA — are now useless due to the speed at which quantum ...