A model used in cryptographic security proofs, in which concrete primitives such as hash functions are replaced with a "random oracle": a hypothetical black box that maps its inputs to truly random outputs, but in such a way that the same input always yields the same output.

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Unlinkability of Merkle-Damgård hash function results

Question: Are multiple outputs of a Merkle-Damgård hash function (or specifically SHA-256, if this can only be said for a specific algorithm) on unknown data unlinkable? If yes: Can this be formally ...
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How to force an adversary to call a certain oracle?

Consider there is a protocol in real world, which uses a random oracle $\mathcal{H}$. In the ideal world, after the calling of $\mathcal{H}$ by some parties, intuitively I want the simulator gets some ...
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122 views

Formal proof of theorem concerning the Random Oracle Model

Reading a book on cryptography by Douglas R. Stinson I've met the following theorem, which is stated without proof (see here). Thereby, $\mathcal{F^{X,Y}}$ denotes the set of all functions from $\...
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Obfuscating point-like functions

There are standard schemes for obfuscating a point function; I'm wondering if we know how to obfuscate a slight generalization of a point function. I'll elaborate more precisely. Definition 1. A ...
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How can I prove that this encryption scheme from a random oracle is secure?

I am reading this example: A random oracle is an ideal object. What makes a random oracle convenient for proofs is the part about knowing nothing on the output for a given input if you do not ...
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Why security proof uses random oracles in identity-based encryption?

In identity-based encryption, users decrypt the ciphertext by using private keys. Without private key, no one will be able to decrypt.In security proofs like here, random oracles are used with the ...
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185 views

Zero Knowledge Non Interactive Proof with random oracle

I am trying to write an assay about Non Interactive Zero-Knowledge proofs and would like to take the simple discrete logarithm problem example fallowing the Feige-Fiat-Shamir heuristics. I understand ...
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60 views

Forward Secrecy with pseudorandom functions

Let $H_1$, $H_2$ be keyed hash functions (e.g. $H_i(x) = SHA_{256}(s_i||x)$ for pseudorandom $s_1$, $s_2$). Let $s_n = H_1^k(s_0)$, $k_n = H_2(s_n)$, where $s_0$ is a secret (pseudorandomly chosen ...
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Independence of answers to queries sent to a random oracle

Assume we have an algorithm which asks random oracle $\mathcal{O}$ $Q$ queries $u_1, \ldots, u_Q$. All queries are unique, $u_i \neq u_j$ for $i \neq j$. Queries $u_i$ are random variables, too. What ...
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What is the non-programmable random oracle model?

I would like to know the difference between the random oracle model and the non-programmable random oracle model. ​ What is the difference?
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Is original DSA a TEGTSS-I scheme?

Brickell et al. define TEGTSS-I scheme in paper "Design validations for discrete logarithm based signature schemes" In this paper original DSA is generalized as DSA-I variant where $r = g^k \bmod p \...