Rijndael is a family of symmetric block-ciphers with block and keys sizes of 128, 160, 192, 224, or 256 bits.

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Rijndael S-boxes: Where do the $\mu$ and $\nu$ polynomial ring elements come from?

I've asked some other questions before about Rijndael's S-boxes, and step by step I'm coming to an understanding; but those steps often guide me to new questions. I did some lines of code to ...
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247 views

Why is AES unbreakable?

Why is it said that AES is unbreakable? Brute force attacks would take years to crack it, so is it possible to crack it if the computational speed of machines increase in the following decade?
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Repeating something encrypted and non-encrypted?

If one wants to keep the receiver's name non encrypted, but it also appears in the encrypted message - will it leak information? (other than the receiver's name, of course.) Let's assume a "bad" case ...
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Why is Rijndael key length restricted?

Why is Rijndael restricted to key length in {128, 160, 192, 224, 256} bits (and not larger)? The algorithm looks to me like it would support an arbitrary-sized key (multiple of 32). The rounds ...
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Found a way to crack AES-128, what now?

I have just found a way to crack AES-128 in a reasonable time (1-2 days). How do I publish and prove this? I remember reading about lots of people who cracked DES and other ciphers but how did they ...
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How can I calculate the Rijndael SBox?

I would like to implement the Rijndael subBytes() operation using calculation instead of tables, because I like to play with this on different wordsizes, as an ...
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322 views

Choice of multiplication polynomial in Rijndael s-box affine mapping

The Rijndael specification details the design choices for the s-box in section 7.2. They describe the choice of affine mapping as follows: We have chosen an affine mapping that has a very simple ...
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140 views

How can I find the multiplicative inverse in the first transformation of the SubBytes() transformation in AES?

In FIPS-197 §5.1.1 , it says the first transformation in the SubBytes() transformation is: Take the multiplicative inverse in the finite field $\text{GF}(2^8)$ described in Sec. 4.2; the ...
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289 views

About the Rijndael/AES sbox polynomial (subBytes)

I've recently read a question about the irreducible polynomial behind the subBytes() operation in the Rijndael that has awakened and old curiosity I have: Why $\,m(x)$ was chosen as ...
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115 views

IV = Filename XOR CipherKey?

i want to encrypt transparently using Rijndael. So this is, what I thought of and I would like to have an opinion from "Experts" whether this will harm encryption strenght. I am using chunks of 1MB ...
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196 views

a doubt in Rijndael's key expansion sizes

I've often heard/read that AES key sizes 256 & 192 would be weaker than 128 or not stronger as expected from the size increase, but I've never seen a proof. How does one proof the strength of a ...
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Choice of reduction polynomial in Whirlpool's internal cipher

Whirlpool is an interesting little hash function in the Miyaguchi-Preneel family. In my mind, it's most interesting feature is the design of internal cipher W, where the distinction between key and ...
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Does the key schedule function need to be a one-way function?

For some key schedule $e_n(e_{n-1}(k))$ (where $e_{n-1}(k)$ is the result of the previous round) , does $e$ need to be a one-way function? In the case of DES or Rijndael the key schedule doesn't ...
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174 views

What is “serial concatenation”? [closed]

I have a third-party point-of-sale API (Speedflow Pay-N-Get) that I am trying to communicate with over HTTP, but I have a problem with it. In a nutshell, a request is encrypted using RSA, and the ...
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1answer
307 views

Rijndael: explanation of Rcon on Wikipedia?

I stumbled onto the explanation of Rijndael Rcon on Wikipedia, and I can't follow it. The example for Rcon indicates that Rcon(9) is 0x1b. That could make sense… ...
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535 views

Where is the S-Box generated in Rijandel/AES?

It's rather kind of lame questions, and I can't find good and clear explanation: In which step of Rijandel is S-box generated? Is the S-box reused in every round of cipher or is generated in every ...
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Using IV buffer after altered inside a Rijndael CBC Encryption/Decryption process as IV for next message?

When sending a block to be decrypted or encrypted, with RijndaelCBC, we input the data to decrypt/encrypt and an IV for syncing and to prevent identical outputs for identical inputs. This question is ...
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AES key expansion: 256bit key

In AES algorithm, in the key schedule, Why does the expansion of a 256 bit key need an extra application of the S-box, unlike the expansion of 128 bit and 192 bit keys ? (The obvious answer would be ...
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AES ENCRYPTION ALGORITHM [closed]

What is the amount of decrease in the probability of decrypting a data encrypted using an AES algorithm? (That is by introducing each round out of ten whole rounds, how the probability of decryption ...
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Why does Rijndael with a 256-bit block require the bottom two rows to be shifted one more space than usual?

From Wikipedia: For a 256-bit block, the first row is unchanged and the shifting for the second, third and fourth row is 1 byte, 3 bytes and 4 bytes respectively. Why the change? Is there any ...
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Difference between Rijndael 128 / 256 blocksize implementations? (and impact of block size in general)

Can anyone shed some light onto the advantages/disadvantages of using Rijndael with 256-bit block size, as opposed to the 128-bit (AES) implementation? (please note: I'm not referring to key-size ...
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NIST Standard for Advanced Encryption Standard Algorithm [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Advantage of AES(Rijndael) over Twofish and Serpent What is the reason of NIST why Rijndael choose as the Advanced Encryption Standard
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Advantage of AES(Rijndael) over Twofish and Serpent

I'm trying to figure out a suitable encryption technique and after reading a bit, I figured the current AES 128-bit encryption is suitable for what I'm trying to do. However, this is more due to the ...
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292 views

What is the complexity of the Square attack against the reduced 4-rounds 128-bit Rijndael variant?

I'm looking at a square attack against a reduced version of AES-128 with only 4 rounds (with block and key size of each 128 bit). I have a set of 256 plaintext-ciphertext block pairs. What is the ...
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Storage of Private Keys

I'm building a bitcoin web application that will require all users to be assigned a wallet for adding funds to their account. I plan on exposing the public key to the user (the bitcoin address). Users ...
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What is the difference between these AES encryption methods

I am using AES encryption (Rijindael) with Base-64 encoding in Obj-C and VB. I am currently using the following two projects to achieve this: Obj-C: ...
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515 views

How were the AES key and block length subsets of Rijndael selected?

My intuition tells me it's a trade off between speed and security, but how did the standardisation process select these three seemingly arbitrary key lengths (namely, AES-128, AES-192, AES-256).
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How does the key schedule of Rijndael looks for keysizes other than 128 bit?

It said in Wikipedia that: [....] Rijndael can be specified with block and key sizes in any multiple of 32 bits, with a minimum of 128 bits. The blocksize has a maximum of 256 bits, but the ...