an asymmetric (e.g. public-key) cryptosystem, based on modular exponentiation with big exponents and modulus. RSA can be used both for signature and encryption.

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How do I solve this RSA instance for m?

How we can solve this equation and get the value of M? $$8 = M^{13} \mod 33$$ not a computer program, but a mathematical operation.
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1answer
807 views

RSA-based authentication and key-agreement protocol

An authentication and key-agreement protocol between devices shall mutually demonstrate their identity, and establish a shared random secret $R$ suitable for securing later communications. To that ...
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1answer
806 views

Demonstrating the insecurity of an RSA signature encoding scheme

I'm working on problem 12.4 from Katz-Lindell. The problem is as follows: Given a public encoding function $\newcommand{\enc}{\operatorname{enc}}\enc$ and a textbook RSA signature scheme where ...
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2answers
4k views

Cracking plain RSA without private key

I was wondering whether plain RSA encryption can be cracked given: The public key A plaintext of a known cipher text(s). In other words the decrypted message from an encrypted one (but without ...
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1answer
189 views

What is the property of RSA where N=e?

In RSA, suppose we know that $e=N$ and we are given the value of $e$. ($N = p\cdot q$ for some large primes $p$ and $q$; $\gcd(e, \varphi(N) = 1)$ Can we calculate $d$ ($d = e^{-1} \mod ...
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3answers
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Is it reasonable to assure that p-1 and q-1 aren't smooth?

I came across the requirement that, in RSA, $p-1$ and $q-1$ shouldn't be smooth, shouldn't consist of lots of small factors. Therefore my question: How complicated is it to check whether $p-1$ is ...
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2answers
609 views

Is a RSA-signature of some identifying data a safe way to implement a license key?

I have this idea of implementing a license key: After the user downloads the program, he connects to a website and sends his Windows product ID. The website, then, sends this back to him with a ...
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1answer
1k views

RSA-PSS salt size

One of the inputs of RSA-PSS signing and verification is the salt size. According to PKCS#1, you must know the salt size before the verfication is carried out. However, this makes interoperability ...
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2k views

Are there practical upper limits of RSA key lengths?

Suppose one wanted to use RSA encryption for the sole purpose of sending key bits for use in symmetric crypto systems, a dedicated key exchange system so to speak. And say you didn't think that the ...
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5answers
730 views

Is it feasible to build an index of prime factors?

Would it be possible to break an RSA key, in for example 1 week of time, if the cracker have already spent X number of years building an index of primes by performing every permutation of existing ...
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1answer
321 views

What algorithm does PGP use to encrypt email?

I know it uses RSA/DSA to create keys, but does it use that same algorithm for the actual cipher?
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4answers
13k views

How can I generate large prime numbers for RSA?

What is the currently industry-standard algorithm used to generate large prime numbers to be used in RSA encryption? I'm aware that I can find any number of articles on the Internet that explain how ...
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1answer
2k views

Why has the RSA factoring challenge been withdrawn?

Wikipedia states that RSA challenge has been withdrawn. Does it mean that an efficient factoring algorithm is "just around the corner"? or are there some other reasons? If the challenge was still ...
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1answer
2k views

How do other, non-RSA algorithms, compare to the PKCS #1 standard?

Arguably the PKCS suite of standards have a profit-oriented bias as they are promoted by RSA and promote their algorithms over others in the form of RFCs and other means. I'm considering the ...
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1answer
166 views

When is an asymmetric scheme considered broken?

Does the following quote imply that valid encrypted data can be created and decrypted by someone other than the owner of a private key: An asymmetric encryption scheme is considered to be broken ...
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3answers
291 views

Is it possible to create an asymmetric cryptosystem where the private keys are not easily verifiable as such?

Plaintext that consists of an RSA key is easily recognizable as such, because it satisfies certain mathematical properties, in particular (See the answer for Why can an encrypted private key be brute ...