an asymmetric (e.g. public-key) cryptosystem, based on modular exponentiation with big exponents and modulus. RSA can be used both for signature and encryption.

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Why RSA can't handle numbers above 76?

I'm going to encrypt the characters Zhu, and decrypt them using RSA. I'm using the public key $\{e, n\}$ and private key $\{d, n\}$. The values of $e$, $d$ and $p$ ...
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How many RSA keys before a collision?

I was wondering how many possible private/public keys exist? If a million people – for whatever reason – would try to generate 5 keys each in the same minute (on the same date and time) is there a ...
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Encrypting small values with RSA private key

I'm looking for best practices when it comes to encrypting small (< 128 bytes) amounts of data with the RSA private key. Signing it would make the resulting payload too large.
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Would the ability to efficiently find Discrete Logs have any impact on the security of RSA?

This answer makes the claim that the Discrete Log problem and RSA are independent from a security perspective. RSA labs makes a similar statement: The discrete logarithm problem bears the same ...
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Can we ensure the security of a crypto-algorithm and -implementaton against acoustic cryptanalysis?

Like people always say: “Attacks only get worse…” — which is why I'm asking early. I have been reading the paper “RSA Key Extraction via Low-Bandwidth Acoustic Cryptanalysis” published December 18, ...
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Is there an intuitive explanation as to why only the private key can decrypt a message encrypted with the public key?

I have just learned about using PGP/GPG for email encryption and one thing has always bugged me: How is it possible that a message encrypted with somebody's public key can be decrypted only with that ...
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What changed in PKCS#1 v2.2, and why?

PKCS#1 is one of the most used (de-facto) standard for real-world use of RSA. That's for good reasons: PKCS#1 is well thought, versatile, understandable, has been relatively stable for over two ...
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Security of RSA for paranoids with padding?

RSA for Paranoids (RSAP) (in cryptobytes v3n1), also known as Unbalanced RSA, is a variant of RSA proposed in 1995 by Adi Shamir, as a mean to increase the RSA public modulus size while keeping ...
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Who first published the interest of more than two prime factors in RSA?

Multi-prime RSA is now a well known technique (described here): it uses $k>2$ distinct secret prime factors in the public RSA modulus, with the advantage that, using the CRT, we can gain a speed ...
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RSA leak bits to factor N

Suppose you randomly generate large primes p and q as in RSA, and then tell me N=pq but not p or q. Then, you would like to actually let me factor N, except you should tell me as few bits of ...
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How are random numbers for RSA generated? [duplicate]

The RSA public key encryption requires two very large prime numbers as part of its encryption process that serve as secrets. These are typically generated with cryptographically secure random number ...
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Is it reasonable to assure that p-1 and q-1 aren't smooth?

I came across the requirement that, in RSA, $p-1$ and $q-1$ shouldn't be smooth, shouldn't consist of lots of small factors. Therefore my question: How complicated is it to check whether $p-1$ is ...
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Multiple-prime RSA; how many primes can I use, for a 2048-bit modulus?

In standard RSA, the modulus $n=p_1 p_2$ is a product of two primes $p_1,p_2$ of the same size. Suppose we construct the modulus as a product of multiple primes $p_1,\dots,p_k$, i.e., $n=p_1 p_2 \...
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Why does the PKCS1 RSA private key structure contain more than just exponent and modulus?

The ASN.1 spec for the PKCS1 RSA private key format is as follows: ...
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What makes RSA secure by using prime numbers?

I am just learning about the RSA algorithm. Looking at the first two steps: Choose two distinct prime numbers $p$ and $q$. Compute $n = pq$. I have some probably stupid questions: Why do $p$ ...
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What are advantages of using a HMAC over RSA with SHA-1 hashes?

I am currently studying for an exam and this was a previous question: Give one advantage of using HMACs over using RSA to sign SHA-1 hashes. My thoughts are that it has something to do with the ...
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How does a chosen plaintext attack on RSA work?

How can one run a chosen plaintext attack on RSA? If I can send some plaintexts and get the ciphertexts, how can I find a relation between them which helps me to crack another ciphertext?
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Given enough RSA signature values, is it possible to determine the public key value?

Given enough RSA signature values, is it possible to determine which public key is required to verify the values? Could there be enough information to establish which key is required? Is there ...
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Algorithm for Boneh and Durfee attack on RSA

I am trying to understand various attacks on RSA and I believe that they only way to fully understand the algorithm is to implement it. I am trying to implement the code in this paper (pdf) (Private ...
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Can RSA encryption produce collisions?

In RSA, a message is encrypted by $m^e \pmod N$. $N$ is the modulus, $m$ is the message and $e$ is the public exponent. (I know that $m$ should not be greater than $N$.) My question is, can $m^e$ be ...
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Is RSA padding needed for single recipient, one-time, unique random message?

I want a way to encrypt files using this process: http://crypto.stackexchange.com/a/15 . That is: generate a random password, use that to AES-encrypt a file, and use an RSA public key to encrypt the ...
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Is sharing the modulus for multiple RSA key pairs secure?

In the public-key system RSA scheme, each user holds beyond a public modulus $m$ a public exponent, $e$, and a private exponent, $d$. Suppose that Bob's private exponent is learned by other users. ...
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How much computing resource is required to brute-force RSA?

It's been over 30 years since Rivest, Shamir and Adleman first publicly described their algorithm for public-key cryptography; and the intelligence community is thought to have known about it for ...
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879 views

If RSA is only used to encrypt symmetric keys which are random, what's wrong with textbook RSA?

IND-CPA is used to protect against frequency analysis AFAICT. But if RSA is only used to encrypt symmetric keys (AFAICT) then what's wrong with using only textbook RSA because random keys are very ...
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What is the length of an RSA signature?

Is it the same as the bits of the key (So a 2048 bit system will yield a 2048 bit signature)? At most as the key? Or something else entirely?
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Cycle attack on RSA

I originally posted this question in the mathematics section, you can see it here. Let $p$ and $q$ be large primes, $n=pq$ and $e : 0<e<\phi(n), \space gcd(e, \phi(n))=1$ the public encyption ...
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Low Public Exponent Attack for RSA

I'm having trouble understanding the algorithm for finding the original message $m$, when there is a small public exponent. Here is the example I'm trying to follow (you can also read it in the 'Low ...
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Is RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5 a good signature scheme for new systems?

Is RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5 a good signature scheme to recommend that people use in new systems? Is it believed to be secure and represent the state-of-the-art in RSA-based signatures? I understand that ...
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Is it possible to get an RSA encryption key by comparing the unencrypted and encrypted file?

Exactly what the title says. If I have a RSA encrypted file, and the exact same file but decrypted, can I tell the key that was used from that information?
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Given a message and signature, find a public key that makes the signature valid

Given a message $M$ and a signature $S$, is it feasible to find a RSA public key $(n,e)$ such that $S$ verifies as a valid signature on $M$ (using this public key)? What if we're given one public key ...
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Is an RSA variant with public exponent $e=f+(p-1)\cdot(q-1)$ safe (for $f$ random in some small interval)?

Alice is going to use some existing RSA scheme (employing industry-standard signature or/and encryption with proper padding), which she can't change, or influence beyond her choice of key. In this ...
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Using the same RSA keypair to sign and encrypt

The RSA signature operation is basically the same as encrypting with the private key. In particular, both operations use the same kind of keys. Is it safe to use the same RSA keypair both for ...
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RSA and prime difference

It is known that the two prime factors $p$ and $q$ of an RSA modulus $n$ should not be too close to each other, otherwise an attacker may factor the modulus. In other words, $\Delta = \left| p - q \...
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Why has the RSA factoring challenge been withdrawn?

Wikipedia states that RSA challenge has been withdrawn. Does it mean that an efficient factoring algorithm is "just around the corner"? or are there some other reasons? If the challenge was still ...
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557 views

What does “Inverting the RSA function is as hard as factoring” mean (a rigorous explanation or intuitive will do)?

I was reading that a current open problem is if inverting the RSA function is as hard as factoring. Does this mean that, its an open problem whether, if given a subroutine that computes in ...
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Could this “symmetric RSA” scheme provide key compromise resistant communications?

This question, and fkraiem's answer to it, made me wonder about the security and practicality of using "symmetric RSA" to provide a partially compromise-resistant secure channel. Specifically, assume ...
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Can RSA be securely used for “blind decryption”?

Assume we have the following setup: A client with trusted storage and computing capabilities (e.g. a smartcard) A server with trusted computing and short-term storage capabilities (e.g. RAM + CPU, ...
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Why MACs are so important despite digital signatures doing everything a MAC can do and more

When an entity A wants to send a message to entity B, he can attach a MAC to the message. Entity B on receiving the message can use the pre-shared key to compute the same MAC and confirm if the ...
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Which attacks are possible against raw/textbook RSA?

The PKCS#1 standard defines multiple padding schemes for signature generation/verification (EMSA-PSS and EMSA-PKCS1-v1_5), and encryption/decryption (EME-OAEP and the less safe EME-PKCS1-v1_5). ...
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Why hash or salt when signing? [duplicate]

I've seen an example of how to sign using RSA. Besides the signing itself (s = m^d mod n) it also hashes and adds an IV. Why is that needed?
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Would RSA make sense if we used no computers?

I was recently wondering - would RSA be useful if we brought it to, say, medieval times? Could you choose the keys so that you could encrypt/decrypt messages quite easily, but factoring the private ...
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Chinese Remainder Theorem and RSA

Wikipedia has a nice section regarding the speedup of the RSA decryption using the Chinese Remainder Theorem here. I need to understand the implementation of a similar speedup for the encryption ...
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Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86 bit?

Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86.76611925028119 bit? Here is the complexity for the GNFS (pulled from the linked Wikipedia article): $$\exp\left( \left(\sqrt[3]{\frac{64}{...
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What are some disadvantages of homomorphic encryption schemes?

I'm doing some self-teaching / research for my own benefit in homomorphic cryptography. I've studied both additive and multiplicative schemes (Pallier and RSA respectively), but all I can seem to ...
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Why should the RSA private exponent have the same size as the modulus?

Consider the generation of an RSA key pair with a given modulus size $n$ and a known, small public exponent $e$ (typically $e = 3$ or $e = 65537$). A common method is to generate two random primes ...
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RSA: Letting $p$ and $q$ have different bit-size

I am aware that there are concerns if $p$ and $q$ are close i.e. $\Delta=|p-q|$ can't be too small. But I would like to know if there are any known attacks for cases where $p$ and $q$ take on ...
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In RSA, why is it important choosing e so that it is coprime to φ(n)?

When choosing the public exponent e, it is stressed that $e$ must be coprime to $\phi(n)$, i.e. $\gcd(\phi(n), e) = 1$. I know that a common choice is to have $e = 3$ (which requires a good padding ...
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Given enough RSA ciphertext, is it possible to determine which key was used?

Given enough RSA ciphertext, is it possible to determine which public key was used to generate the ciphertext? Presume an unknown public key that was used to generate RSA ciphertext, and we have ...
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How to argue to a paranoid that RSA is safe?

From today's standpoint, most people would claim RSA to be secure. However, to my knowledge, this is purely based on the speculation that no one knows a computational feasible way to find a $d$ for ...
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Exposing RSA private-key data… bad?

We know that exposing $p$, or $q$ or $\phi(n)$ results in trivial attacks on RSA since they allow us to factor $n$ and to compute the private exponent $d$. In OpenSSL (and most RSA implementations) ...