Questions about formal definitions of "security" for various cryptographic schemes (e.g. perfect secrecy, semantic security, ciphertext indistinguishability, etc.)

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5
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1answer
41 views

Hard-core predicates: should the adversary be given $1^n$?

In most (all?) classical sources such as the book of Goldreich (2001), hard-core predicated are defined thus: A polynomial-time computable predicate $b : \{0,1\}^* \to \{0,1\}$ is a hard-core of a ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Bridging the gap between security proofs and “real-world” security

I've been studying cryptography for a little while. I understand fairly well the nuts and bolts of security proofs, but I'm having trouble reconciling the formal statements of security in these proofs ...
2
votes
0answers
125 views

On the Definition of a PRG and a CSPRG

I've been looking at the definition of a PRG, here. This is a broader notion than a cryptographically secure PRG ("CSPRG"), which is described here. I am realizing that I am very confused by this ...
2
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0answers
126 views

Ideal system for an encryption scheme

What is the ideal system for an encryption scheme? For a pseudorandom permutation the ideal one is a random permutation, for a pseudorandom function the ideal one is a random function. For an ...
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vote
0answers
85 views

Privacy-Preserving Protocols and Proofs of Security

While dabbling in privacy-preserving protocols (mainly using Semi-Homomorphic Encryption) and coming up with miscellaneous ideas for comparison tests or other similar primitives, based on obfuscation ...
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0answers
29 views

Outsourced Multiparty computation proof in Ideal world

I need to know in an outsourced two party computation where honst $A$ and $B$ outsource their private and secure data to a malicious server, why we need to design a simulator that interacts with an ...
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0answers
42 views

Role of trusted party in the Ideal model in Malicious case

Imagine there is a protocol supporting outosurced multi party computation. There are three parties involved in the protocol: client $A$, client $B$ and a server. Client $A$ and $B$ send their private ...