SHA-3, also known as Keccak, is a cryptographic hash function standardized by NIST as a new alternative to the SHA-2 hash function family.

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What are the key differences between the draft SHA-3 standard and the Keccak submission?

I just noticed that on the NIST website there is a PDF with a draft of the SHA-3 standard (i.e. FIPS 202) (marked as "new", and seemingly the page was last changed on April 7, 2014). Previously it ...
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Keccak padding implementation, and bit ordering

I am trying to implement Keccak in Java for my school work. And I am getting stuck in two places: On the summary page the padding is shown as P = M || 0x01 || 0x00 || … || 0x00 P = P xor ...
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What is the chance of a collision when using SHA-3?

I currently am writing a web app and am using two random hashes that are before and after the string and are both 50 char long (alphabet, numbers, and special chars). ...
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Did NIST verify “post-quantum” claims in the SHA3 proposal papers?

I have been reading Bernstein’s “Quantum attacks against Blue Midnight Wish, ECHO, Fugue, Grøstl, Hamsi, JH, Keccak, Shabal, SHAvite-3, SIMD, and Skein” paper from 2010… This document disproves ...
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Why are the initial states of hashes functions (like SHA-1) often non-zero?

There is already a question asking "Why initialize SHA1 with specific buffer?" and my question follows on from this: Why are the initial states of hash functions often non-zero? For most, I have ...
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When NIST disallows the use of 1024-bit keys, what effect will that have on SHA-3 (with max. 512 bits)?

Quoting the article Gone in 60 Months or Less: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has disallowed the use of 1024-bit keys after 31 December 2013 because they are insecure. ...
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Are NIST's changes to Keccak/SHA-3 problematic?

NIST is working on standardizing SHA-3. They have selected Keccak as the basis for SHA-3, and they plan to make some small changes to it; the result (with NIST's changes) will be standardized as ...
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Using SHA3 as an entropy pool

Has any work been done on analyzing the SHA3 sponge construction for use as an entropy pool (e.g. /dev/random)? All the use cases I've heard of consts of a ...
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Why restricting SHA3 to have only two possible capacities?

I just read the presentation slides of John M. Kesley (from NIST) for his invited talk at CHES 2013 about SHA-3 and learned that NIST is going to standardize Keccak with a possibly modified padding ...
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What is the origin of the word “Keccak”?

Where does the word or acronym Keccak come from? Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen, Michael Peeters, and Gilles Van Assche. Keccak sponge function family main document. Submission to NIST (updated), 2009. ...
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What's the most secure way to derive a key from a password repeatably?

I'm trying to write a cloud storage application where everything the user uploads is unreadable by the server, encrypted client-side before being sent. Currently, the flow looks like this: User ...
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Any point in waiting for the SHA-3 standard?

The Wikipedia article on SHA-3 says that Keccak has been chosen but the standard hasn't been issued. Does this matter? That is, can we just assume it's going to be as specified by the submitters ...
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Why are the constants so simple in Keccak?

Keccak, the construction selected for SHA-3 is very interesting. It seems unlike other primitives and has chosen very simple constants. (Keccak talk PDF) The initial values of the state in Keccak is ...
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Does Keccak have an eTCR mode?

On page 7 of NIST's views on SHA-3's security requirements and Evaluation of attacks, I see that, at least at this point, NIST planned on offering SHA-3 having eTCR security (defined on page 3): ...
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What security do Cryptographic Sponges offer against generic quantum attacks?

In the face of non-quantum attacker, Keccak[r=1088,c=512] with 512 bits of output provides: Collision resistance up to $2^{256}$ operations Preimage resistance up to $2^{256}$ operations Second ...