SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and its successor TLS (Transport Layer Security) are protocols which provide communication security (privacy and integrity) for a bidirectional data channel.

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SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?

Many browsers and Internet companies have recently claimed that SSL Certificates with a signature algorithm of SHA1 will immanently no longer be considered secure. Most notably, Google and Google ...
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Protocol for establishing physical ownership of a connected/IoT device?

If I'm connected to a device e.g. using BLE are there rules/protocols for establishing that I'm also in physical possession of that device (at least for the first time I connect to it)? Crypto is in ...
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1answer
54 views

Is it possible to hand-negotiate an SSL/TLS session?

I'm interested in trying to hand-negotiate an SSL/TLS session. Similar to how one would use telnet to port 80 and type GET / HTTP/1.1. I know there's a lot of steps ...
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What does “G2” mean when used with X509 certficates and certificate authorities?

For example "Google Internet Authority G2"?. I thought it was another way of specifying Class 2 (for organizations, for which proof of identity is required) but then see certificates such as "VeriSign ...
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7answers
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How can SSL secure a two-way communication with only one key-pair?

As I understand it, SSL involved the use of a public-private key pair. How does this enable two-way communication? Suppose I have some server with which I wish to communicate securely. I connect to ...
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2answers
118 views

Are SSL/TLS used for maintaining data confidentiality?

In SSL/TLS, we use symmetric and asymmetric keys to encrypt the data. Does that mean that the keys are used to encrypt the data (preserve the integrity) or provide a secure channel for the data to be ...
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1answer
30 views

Is MAC algorithm same at both sender and receiver end

The MAC algortihm which is used along with a secret key to generate a MAC tag on the sender end ,is it same at the receiver end also who again uses a MAC algorithm to generate a tag? If yes, then how ...
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1answer
127 views

Is SHA related to AES or TLS in any way

I have been reading about SHA-2 family and I found a lot of in depth details, but I am confused about how it is related to TLS and AES. TLS encrypts data between server and client, but does it make ...
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37 views

Is multiple encryption using NaCL and TLS better?

In general, the idea of multiple encryption sounds interesting - for creating stronger cyphers (especially against implementation bugs), one could always get the configuration details wrong and mess ...
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96 views

Should layered use of crypto always have a cryptographic binding between the layers?

Reading the latest TLS weakness, it seems that multiple weaknesses have been found over the years caused by not ensuring that messages are sent over the same channel, and in general a lack of ...
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856 views

Why do new versions of TLS use an explicit IV for CBC suites?

SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 used an insecure scheme to generate implicit IVs when encrypting records in CBC mode: they used the last part of the previous record, a value that can be predicted by the attacker. ...
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7answers
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Google is using RC4, but isn't RC4 considered unsafe?

Why is Google using RC4 for their HTTPS/SSL? $ openssl s_client -connect www.google.com:443 | grep "Cipher is" New, TLSv1/SSLv3, Cipher is RC4-SHA Isn't RC4 ...
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Private Key - Memory Lifecycle

I often heard about private key storage, but rarely about key life cycle in memory. For example, when SSL is used from one peer, the private key is used to sign messages or decrypt other peers' ...
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What is the 'Version Incompatibility" Problem in TLS 1.1/1.2 and 1.0?

It's unclear to me if there are multiple problems, or a single one, (and just what that problem is) with servers incorrectly negotiating down from a client offering 1.1 or 1.2 to something they ...
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2answers
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Why is TLS susceptible to protocol downgrade attacks?

A recent blog post from Ivan Ristić (expert extraordinaire on all things SSL) says: all major browsers are susceptible to protocol downgrade attacks; an active MITM can simulate failure conditions ...
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1answer
127 views

Using Lattice-based cryptography for TLS\SSL

Given the general benefits of Lattice-based cryptography, such as: Post quantum Security Security from worst case scenario Efficiency What could the outlook of shifting from RSA \ ECC-based ...
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3answers
323 views

How vulnerable is the C rand() in public cryptography protocols?

I just learned about the basics of public cryptography a few weeks ago and I am curious as to why the C rand() function should not be used for crypto schemes. For example, say I want to generate a ...
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2answers
3k views

How to distribute session keys in public key cryptography?

In public key cryptography we can also use session keys which are symmetric. How do the sender (say a server) provides this session key information to its clients? If the sender (here server) ...
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1answer
135 views

generate hash of all handshake messages for verify data (DTLS)

I am trying to create a DTLS client finished packet, where I need to generate verify data for handshake hash is need. And here I want to know how to generate handshake hash. As of now I am doing like ...
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2answers
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In RSA, why does $p$ have to be bigger than $q$ where $n=p \times q$?

In openSSL – during RSA key generation – if $q$ is bigger than $p$, they exchange them. Why is that?
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moduli in SSL certificates [closed]

this is normally seen in a typical SSL certificate. For the modulus, I know that it is represented in hexadecimal form, but why is there a semicolon (:) after every group of 2 digits? ...
2
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1answer
184 views

SSL-like protocol with public-key hard-coded in the client

Imagine a SSL-like protocol that instead of using certificates signed by a trusted CA, has the server's public key hard-coded in the client. My question is: what happens if the server's private key is ...
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52 views

key-exchange with websockets in node.js

I do not see how someone would distribute a “key/key agreement” without exposing it to a MITM! I would consider it to be strange if the answer is “via a HTTPS or TLS connection” because – if this is ...
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1answer
55 views

TLS - sharing 1792 bits of unidirectional keys

I've just watched a video on the TLS protocol and learnt that it uses unidirectional keys (meaning keys for both sides, from browser to server and from server to browser). Given that the server uses ...
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1answer
171 views

Why does AES-GCM need MAC? (TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256)

"TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256" is just one example for a cipher suite, as far as I'm concerned it means this: it uses the TLS protocol, exchanges keys with Elliptic Curve Diffie Hellman ...
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What are the consequences of not checking the server mac in a TLS connection?

The context for this question (it's quite involved) can be found in this document: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B15itpMWb2ztWTJrYTgzX204OVU However, I want to make it clear that you don't have to ...
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1answer
117 views

Pick faster private exponent

I recently tried to send 1536-bit modulus CSR to COMODO. They refused to sign the certificate. I later found out that it's because NIST mandated 2048-bit modulus on the SSL certificate. I think it's ...
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3answers
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Which one of the Block Cipher modes is the best?

I have two questions regarding the Block Cipher Modes: Which one of the modes is considered the best? I know CBC has a problem of IV since the next block of the plain text is XORed with the result ...
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3answers
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How secure is AES-256?

The cipher AES-256 is used among other places in TSL/SSL across the Internet. It's considered among the top ciphers. In theory it's not crackable since the combinations of keys are massive. Although ...
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1answer
97 views

How does this SSL-related flaw work?

I just saw a video at CNN in which it is claimed that, if the server isn't generating a random public key, the server can be hacked. First how HTTPS works… to be sure I’m on the same page: Server ...
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1answer
134 views

Is AES-256 over AES-128 weakening the original encryption?

When transfering data using TLS the browser and server agree the cipher suite to be used - so for example this could be chosen as AES-128 and is (probably) outside of my control. If I separately ...
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Is TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA still a secure cipher to use? [duplicate]

I have read numerous times that the RC4 cipher itself is considered broken in TLS. Still many websites are using the TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA configuration even to date. Now, I know that sometimes ...
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1answer
112 views

Does AES 256 really make sense in hybrid crypto systems when the PKI is the bottleneck?

AES 256 is used widely in hybrid crypto systems (e.g. SSL/TLS). According to keylength.com a 2048 bit public key corresponds to 112 bits of security. Does it make sense to use AES 256 in this ...
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1answer
42 views

How is an X.509 public key used for TLS?

Wikipedia's TLS article says: The client responds with a ClientKeyExchange message, which may contain a PreMasterSecret, public key, or nothing. (Again, this depends on the selected cipher.) This ...
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433 views

What is wrong with AES-CTR-HMAC-SHA256 - or why is it not in TLS?

It seems the only specified CTR mode ciphers in TLS are all GCM based. GCM ciphers run AES-CTR and do authenticated encryption with a MAC based on Galois-field ...
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3answers
292 views

Is SSL broken? If so, what can I do about it? [closed]

But recently, with the scandals about the (in)filtrations, I read that the NSA (and of course others, but I'm not particularly worried about NSA) is able to break SSL and track your data. It is true? ...
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1answer
56 views

Using beginning of TLS ecnrypted data to reveal secret [duplicate]

I have the following question about TLS security: Assume TLS-PSK protected HTTP with AES256-CBC cipher. When a TLS connection is established, client sends some encrypted data, where the plaintext is ...
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1answer
305 views

CVE-2014-1295 (Apple's Secure Transport and Triple Handshake Attack)

Apple is releasing some updates today. They have not published the bulletins yet, but they are available here: https://gist.github.com/FredericJacobs/11189734. In the writeup for CVE-2014-1295: ...
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Cryptographic library quality [closed]

I've been working on a project that will require secure communication over the internet, so I've been thinking of TLS 1.2. After looking around I chose Botan but then I thought about using a more ...
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1answer
65 views

How do they implement MAC in TLS?

I recently read questions about "MAC then Encrypt/Encrypt then MAC" which made me curious about how they actually use the algorithm. MAC only calculated once either case (according to what I read). ...
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2answers
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Perfect Forward Secrecy in TLS

I read that TLS does PFS using Diffie Hellman. However, DH can be used even without certificates - so how is DHE-RSA better than plain DHE? Is DHE a insecure algorithm, that DHE-RSA is needed?
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Separate TLS Client Write and Server Write Keys in AES-CCM Mode

I am designing a system that uses TLS-like handshaking on a resource-constrained embedded system. I have settled on AES-CCM mode for symmetric session encryption and authentication, allowing ...
2
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1answer
123 views

TLS Key Block calculation - What is a PRF?

In Section 6.3 of the RFC for TLS 1.2, it is written that the key_block is derived from the following formula: ...
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276 views

TLS/SSL's usage of Non-Ephemeral DH vs DHE

These questions revolve around DH and ECDH vs DHE and ECDHE. Specifically within the context of TLS/SSL. There are three ...
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1answer
106 views

HKDF vs TLS PRF. Which of the one is better? [closed]

Which of the one (HKDF or TLS1.1+ PRF) is more secure and why?
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1answer
38 views

Alert protocol in TLS

Assuming the alert protocol is encrypted AFTER a session has been established and the structure below, how does the client know whether to expect encrypted data or not? ...
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2answers
285 views

At what stage is DHE and RSA used during the SSL/TLS handshake?

At what stage of the SSL/TLS handshake is the DHE and RSA used and what is the purpose of using a pre-master secret when you could just use RSA to exchange the symmetric key (i.e. AES) for further ...
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180 views

Compare RFC 5246 SessionID re-use versus RFC 5077 Session Resumption?

Can you help me understand the differences, both algorithmic and practical, between RFC 5246 SessionID re-use and RFC 5077 Session Resumption? Both appear to be ways to nail up a second TLS session ...
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How to create PSK key? [closed]

I'd like to create a PSK key to use with TLS-RSA-PSK-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA - what is the format of this key?