SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and its successor TLS (Transport Layer Security) are protocols which provide communication security (privacy and integrity) for a bidirectional data channel.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

53
votes
5answers
28k views

Technical feasibility of decrypting https by replacing the computer's PRNG

Intel has an on-chip RdRand function which supposedly bypasses the normally used entropy pool for /dev/urandom and directly injects output. Now rumors are going on that Intel works together with the ...
28
votes
7answers
16k views

Google is using RC4, but isn't RC4 considered unsafe?

Why is Google using RC4 for their HTTPS/SSL? $ openssl s_client -connect www.google.com:443 | grep "Cipher is" New, TLSv1/SSLv3, Cipher is RC4-SHA Isn't RC4 ...
20
votes
3answers
20k views

How can I use SSL/TLS with Perfect Forward Secrecy?

I'm new to the field of cryptography, but I want to make the web a better web by setting up the sites that I host with Perfect Forward Secrecy. I have a list of questions regarding the setup of ...
16
votes
7answers
3k views

How can SSL secure a two-way communication with only one key-pair?

As I understand it, SSL involved the use of a public-private key pair. How does this enable two-way communication? Suppose I have some server with which I wish to communicate securely. I connect to ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

Is HTTPS secure if someone snoops the initial handshake?

Let's say I'm on an open wireless network that's being actively sniffed and I connect to an HTTPS site. Even though my subsequent traffic is encrypted, couldn't the sniffer use the data from the ...
14
votes
1answer
985 views

Why do new versions of TLS use an explicit IV for CBC suites?

SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 used an insecure scheme to generate implicit IVs when encrypting records in CBC mode: they used the last part of the previous record, a value that can be predicted by the attacker. ...
12
votes
4answers
46k views

How secure is AES-256?

The cipher AES-256 is used among other places in TSL/SSL across the Internet. It's considered among the top ciphers. In theory it's not crackable since the combinations of keys are massive. Although ...
10
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is CAMELLIA suddenly so widely used?

When nowadays I point my browser to https sites, the cipher that is on most occasions used is Camellia. My browsers (Chrome and Firefox) seem to prefer it, even when AES is available. Is that not ...
10
votes
2answers
356 views

Is RC4 a problem for password-based authentication?

This is a follow-up question to Does TLS use RC4-drop[n]?. As mentioned in section 6 of RFC4345, there are weak distinguishers for RC4 keystreams available that even work for keystreams that ...
9
votes
2answers
7k views

How can Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) in SSL be attacked?

I am trying to understand how CBC-mode in SSL/TLS can be attacked. I have been looking around online but all examples and explanations are very hard to understand and follow. Can you give a simple ...
8
votes
2answers
3k views

Why is TLS susceptible to protocol downgrade attacks?

A recent blog post from Ivan Ristić (expert extraordinaire on all things SSL) says: all major browsers are susceptible to protocol downgrade attacks; an active MITM can simulate failure conditions ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the purpose of four different secrets shared by client and server in SSL/TLS?

I was looking through the working of SSL V3, and found that a connection state is defined by a set of things, including client write mac secret, server write mac secret, server write key, client ...
7
votes
1answer
493 views

What is wrong with AES-CTR-HMAC-SHA256 - or why is it not in TLS?

It seems the only specified CTR mode ciphers in TLS are all GCM based. GCM ciphers run AES-CTR and do authenticated encryption with a MAC based on Galois-field ...
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Why do we need asymmetric algorithms for key exchange?

In SSL protocols, both symmetric and asymmetric algorithms are used. Why is it so? The symmetric algorithms are more secure and easier to implement. Why are asymmetric algorithms usually preferred in ...
6
votes
2answers
304 views

Is SSL getting faster because it's getting less secure?

There has been some discussion about it being more practical to use SSL due to advances in hardware. From my understanding, stronger public-key encryption means that both encrypting/decrypting and ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

With OpenSSL and ECDHE, how to show the actual curve being used?

Using openssl s_client -host myserver.net -port 443 I can see the cipher negotiated is indeed using ECDHE for session key ...
6
votes
3answers
297 views

Is SSL broken? If so, what can I do about it? [closed]

But recently, with the scandals about the (in)filtrations, I read that the NSA (and of course others, but I'm not particularly worried about NSA) is able to break SSL and track your data. It is true? ...
6
votes
2answers
210 views

Cryptanalysis and weaknesses of SEED cipher

I've discovered that a client has SEED enabled in their SSL ciphers, and would like to know a bit more about it from a security perspective. The Wikipedia article doesn't mention any flaws, yet I've ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

How key materials are generated in SSL V3 from master secret

The generation of key materials is given by ...
6
votes
1answer
741 views

What causes first block of AES decryption to be garbled, even with correct IV?

I am attempting to duplicate wireshark's packet capture decryption for a TLS HTTP session, where I control the private key of the server. The cipher suite number is 0x00002f, TLS_RSA_AES_128_CBC_SHA ...
6
votes
1answer
368 views

Does TLS use RC4-drop[n]?

According to many sources, the first few (n) bytes of the RC4 keystream are strongly biased, and therefore should be discarded before using the keystream to encrypt anything; this precaution is ...
5
votes
2answers
714 views

Does a trace of SSL packets provide a proof of data authenticity?

I'm wondering if it would make sense to record a whole HTTPS session, publish its encryption keys and present it to third parties as a proof that this particular data was sent by a given server ...
5
votes
3answers
480 views

How vulnerable is the C rand() in public cryptography protocols?

I just learned about the basics of public cryptography a few weeks ago and I am curious as to why the C rand() function should not be used for crypto schemes. For example, say I want to generate a ...
5
votes
1answer
276 views

SHA1 no longer considered secure for SSL Certificates — what about Cipher Suites?

Many browsers and Internet companies have recently claimed that SSL Certificates with a signature algorithm of SHA1 will imminently no longer be considered secure. Most notably, Google and Google ...
5
votes
1answer
221 views

Why is TLS SRP verifier based on user name?

I don't understand why TLS SRP (or SRP in general) includes the user name in verifier calculation, given that user name is basically public. From spec RFC 5054 $x$, which is then used to calculate ...
5
votes
2answers
460 views

Camellia or AES - which should I use?

Imagine I am a software developer. I want a block cipher, and I have the choice of using AES or Camellia. Which should I use? Which makes more sense from a technical perspective, and why? I need ...
5
votes
1answer
133 views

Using encryption schemes for identification

I've been researching how to implement a post-quantum SSL-like connection authentication, especially correct identification&authentization of the server/client. Because good post-quantum digital ...
4
votes
3answers
4k views

Which one of the Block Cipher modes is the best?

I have two questions regarding the Block Cipher Modes: Which one of the modes is considered the best? I know CBC has a problem of IV since the next block of the plain text is XORed with the result ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Which stream cipher can we replace the RC4 in the SSL?

In cryptography, the Fluhrer, Mantin and Shamir attack is a particular stream cipher attack, a dedicated form of cryptanalysis for attacking the widely-used stream cipher RC4. The attack allows an ...
4
votes
1answer
394 views

Client and server using same SSL certificate - any issues?

I'm working on software where multiple components will communicate with each other using SSL. There would be one central component acting as a server, which would also require the clients to present ...
4
votes
1answer
504 views

is this RSA private key valid?

is this RSA private key valid? First, here's the RSA private key in question: ...
4
votes
1answer
212 views

How common are SEED certificates outside of Korea? When is support required?

I'm looking at the SEED algorithm and would like to know if this is still in common usage. Can anyone tell me when I would need to implement this standard, either as a client or a server?
4
votes
1answer
140 views

Using Lattice-based cryptography for TLS\SSL

Given the general benefits of Lattice-based cryptography, such as: Post quantum Security Security from worst case scenario Efficiency What could the outlook of shifting from RSA \ ECC-based ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the 'Version Incompatibility" Problem in TLS 1.1/1.2 and 1.0?

It's unclear to me if there are multiple problems, or a single one, (and just what that problem is) with servers incorrectly negotiating down from a client offering 1.1 or 1.2 to something they ...
3
votes
2answers
183 views

Protocol to generate Client Certificates at the start of a SSL session automatically?

A more secure form of 'cookie' could be created for SSL communications through the following method. The client generates and requests the server to sign a certificate. Then the client authenticates ...
3
votes
3answers
144 views

Why are we not using multiple ciphers per message?

I am aware of at least rsa, elgamal-encryption, and variations of elliptic-curves relying on different problems and that those problems are considered hard. However, if someone figures out a way to ...
3
votes
2answers
261 views

What was the problem in the SSL version 2.0?

What is the main reason (attacks) the appearance of the protocol SSL version 2.0 to replace version 3.0?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What does SSL use? RSA? El-Gamal? Elliptic curves?

I'm not sure what SSL uses to share the symmetric key to both end users, i.e. at the beginning of the communication. Is it RSA? Or El-Gamal? Or something else?
3
votes
3answers
450 views

Does the XML Encryption flaw affect SSL/TLS?

A "practical attack against XML's cipher block chaining (CBC) mode" has been demonstrated: XML Encryption Flaw Leaves Web Services Vulnerable. Does this weakness of CBC-mode which is used here also ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

How to distribute session keys in public key cryptography?

In public key cryptography we can also use session keys which are symmetric. How do the sender (say a server) provides this session key information to its clients? If the sender (here server) ...
3
votes
1answer
247 views

Why does AES-GCM need MAC? (TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256)

"TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256" is just one example for a cipher suite, as far as I'm concerned it means this: it uses the TLS protocol, exchanges keys with Elliptic Curve Diffie Hellman ...
3
votes
1answer
774 views

Possible ECC backdoor and its impact on Internet traffic

In a recent article, Bruce Schneier suggested that he prefers classic discrete log crypto over ECC because "I no longer trust the constants. I believe the NSA has manipulated them through their ...
3
votes
1answer
157 views

SSL Key Exchange

I read briefly over the TSL/SSL key exchange protocol. I have to wonder about the whole pre-master-key procedure. Wouldn't it be sufficient if the client or server encrypted a generated session key ...
3
votes
1answer
325 views

Compare RFC 5246 SessionID re-use versus RFC 5077 Session Resumption?

Can you help me understand the differences, both algorithmic and practical, between RFC 5246 SessionID re-use and RFC 5077 Session Resumption? Both appear to be ways to nail up a second TLS session ...
3
votes
3answers
221 views

Is the following authentication protocol insecure?

I am a student taking cryptography this semester. I was just wondering why can't we use this simple protocol? Alice → Open Connection → Bob Alice ← Cert$_b$ ← Bob Alice → {K$_{AB}$}$_{Bob}$ → Bob ...
3
votes
1answer
173 views

TLS: Is Integrity assured when using NULL cipher

In specific implementation we're using TLS 1.0, open ssl 0.9.8 but i'm referring to RFC 5246. For performance reasons, I'm being asked if we can use TLS without encryption. The hope is that the ...
3
votes
1answer
259 views

Is there a field guide to ECC for the IT Security layman?

I'm trying to understand ECC from an IT layman's perspective and am trying to separate the theory from the standards, and understand why certain features are implemented or not implemented in the ...
2
votes
3answers
117 views

Is it true the longer the key length is the more secure the encryption?

Then why don't we use xxxxxxx bits encryption? what stopping us from using a very lengthy key? I am referring to the encryption we use with SSL
2
votes
2answers
202 views

In RSA, why does $p$ have to be bigger than $q$ where $n=p \times q$?

In openSSL – during RSA key generation – if $q$ is bigger than $p$, they exchange them. Why is that?
2
votes
2answers
102 views

Could someone reuse client certificates?

To my understanding, if a server “cert+key” (RSA) is compromised, than the SSL/TLS network traffic can be decrypted. What about a client “cert+key” (RSA)? Could someone reuse client certificates? ...