Symmetric cryptosystems assume two communicating entities share a pre-established secret key.

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The relationship between the key length and encrypt time in Xor algorithm?

I did work on the encryption algorithm and the decryption using the XOR method noticed that when more the key length, the less time spent on encryption and decryption. I have two questions in ...
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55 views

El Gamal encryption scheme and symmetric encryption scheme

Consider the El Gamal encryption scheme, a symmetric encryption scheme (KG,E,D), and the following hybrid encryption scheme having an encryption algorithm that, on input a public key (G,q,g,h), where ...
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134 views

Leak-proof protocol: is such a thing possible?

Is it possible to design a protocol that by itself guarantees that a malicious implementation cannot leak secret data without breaking the protocol? Setting: Alice and Bob have a pre-shared secret ...
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2answers
74 views

Do we need symmetric cryptosystems?

One question I had to answer in my crypto exam today was: Do we need symmetric cryptosystems? As it stands, that's probably a debatable question, so I'd like to reformulate this as: Are ...
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1answer
178 views

Is there a time-space tradeoff attack for breaking symmetrical cryptos?

Is there any known techniques for using time-space tradeoff for speeding up symmetrical crypto breaking? Kind of like rainbow tables speed up breaking hashes by using huge precomputed tables. Is ...
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1k views

Why does SHA-1 have 80 rounds?

Why does SHA-1 algorithm have exactly 80 rounds? Is it to reduce collisions? If yes, then why do SHA-2 and SHA-3 have a lower number of rounds?
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65 views

How does the key size per data bit influence the security?

The likelihood of breaking, for instance, an AES-128 cipher is 100% after $2^{128}$ tries in brute force, meaning that I've got to try $2^{128}$ keys to certainly break it. What if I (hypothetically) ...
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1answer
132 views

Would a symmetric cipher with a keylength a big as the data length be information theoretically secure?

One-Time-Pad is information theoretically secure as long as the random number stream is evenly long or longer than the data stream it encrypts, for a "decyphered" message could have been any message ...
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1answer
129 views

Do any one-key-of-many cryptographic schemes exist?

I'm pretty sure I understand how public/private key cryptography works. Anybody can encrypt a message using a well-known public key, but only the person who holds the private key can decrypt it. My ...
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1answer
64 views

Number of possible keys in a Play fair cipher [duplicate]

So for the play fair case, the number of possible keys is : 26x26 = 676 possible keys But if we consider the repeated letters, how many unique keys will the play fair have? I mean how will ...
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1answer
69 views

Attacking both authenticity and secrecy in authenticated encryption modes

looks like NIST only approved GCM mode for authenticated encryption and other modes don't have any approval or a good implementation available. Is that possible a weakness in $GHASH$ compromise ...
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39 views

Retrieve cryptographic key knowing cyphertext and plaintext [duplicate]

I was curious about cryptography so I started to learn about symmetric encryption. From what I understand a symmetric encryption works as follow: PlainText -> (Encrypt)K -> Cipher text -> ...
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99 views

Digital Signature using symmetric key cryptography

Generally digital signature is a public key cryptography concept.But it needs high overhead. So is there any publication or link available where 'digital signature using symmetric key' has been ...
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0answers
58 views

Which gives better deterministic encryption SIV or Plain ECB mode?

Lets say , if we encrypt a plain text message $msg$ with key $key$ in below two ways. Which is the below would give better deterministic encryption and why ? AES-ECB($key$ , $msg$) SIV($key$, NIL , ...
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5answers
113 views
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2answers
93 views

IV/Nonce in CTR&GCM mode of operation

We know reusing IV can compromise our secrecy. I have some questions aiming to clarify the use of an IV/Nonce in CTR/GCM: Is it OK to use the same key for encrypting plain-texts in authenticated ...
2
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1answer
57 views

Pseudo random permutation for arbitrary size domains

Popular block ciphers like AES or Twofish are keyed pseudo random permutations on the domain $\{0,1,\dots,2^{k}-1\}$ with $k\in\{128,192,256\}$ or similar. I'm interested in pseudo random ...
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2answers
137 views

Game with symmetric key

Alice and Bob are playing Rock-paper-scissors. Alice chooses $a \leftarrow\{stone, paper, scissors\}$ and a nonce $R_A$ used as symmetric key for encryption $$A → B : A, R_A(a)$$ Bob chooses $b ...
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52 views

Is it feasible to break an encrypted and later encoded message?

A message is sent from a person to another. The plain message is first encrypted, even with a weak algorithm - say, DES. Then, the encrypted message is encoded with a simple substitution, which is ...
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5answers
115 views

Symmetric encryption is no longer necessary?

Here is it: Symmetric encryption is no longer necessary, because all security services can be implemented with public-key cryptography. Moreover, in public key cryptography the operations for ...
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2answers
215 views

ASCII to same-length ASCII encryption?

I need to encrypt an ASCII string [a-zA-Z0-9:] to an ASCII [a-zA-Z0-9] string of the same length. It doesn't have to be unbreakable, it's sufficient that it won't be readable at the first sight. The ...
3
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1answer
108 views

AES: Is it safe to encrypt same cleartext with same key but with million diferent IV?

The encryption mode that I am using is CBC. Algorithm is AES and the key size is 128bit. I will be encrypting a 36 byte string over 1.3 million times with the same key but with a random IV. My ...
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4answers
211 views

Messages exchanged between Bob Alice are encrypted safe?

Can you help me understand the following reasoning? If Alice sends Bob a message and that message is encrypted with two keys simultaneously: a symmetric key (Ks) and Bob's public key. The symmetric ...
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1answer
91 views

Does the key schedule function need to be a one-way function?

For some key schedule $e_n(e_{n-1}(k))$ (where $e_{n-1}(k)$ is the result of the previous round) , does $e$ need to be a one-way function? In the case of DES or Rijndael the key schedule doesn't ...
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83 views

Guessing encryption algorithm based on key and ciphertext

Is it possible to tell which encryption algorithm was used, assuming I have a key and a encrypted text? To not complicate the situation let assume we are speaking about symmetric algorithms only. ...
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1answer
70 views

Are IVs and salts the same and usable for each other uses?

I'm new in the crypto world and I've just discovered PBKDF (I used to use typed passeword as symmetric key). When using some crypto mode, you're required to ...
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87 views

Generate random in secure message transfer

I’m doing a school assignment about secure communications between a Server and a Client. Basically, messages are exchanged between the clients and the server and these communications must implement ...
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357 views

Implement deniable encryption with AES/RSA

I'm on a crypto app using OpenSSL (I'm more an implementer/cryptographer than a cryptologist), mainly as a hobby, for now. My app will be able to encrypt a file (not a container) with symmetric or ...
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3answers
190 views

What are the pros/cons of using symmetric crypto vs. hash in a commitment scheme?

In a commitment scheme, are there any differences on using a symmetric cipher versus using a hash? If at the "opening", I have to reveal $r$ (a random number concatenated with the messaged at the ...
3
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1answer
95 views

What is 'key agility' in relation to symmetric-key encryption?

I sometimes see, in discussions of symmetric ciphers, reference to the 'key agility' of a particular algorithm. It seems to be related to the difficulty of switching encryption keys, but I don't ...
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59 views

The exact definition of a symmetric encryption

I have doubts for the definition of the decryption algorithm $D(.)$. I think I've already seen that the decryption returns a plaintext $M$ on input the key $K$ and $C=E_K(M)$. I have also seen thet ...
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3answers
140 views

Help me about Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

Suppose $E_k$$(a, b, c)$ is encryption of values $a, b$ and $c$ with key $k$ through encryption algorithm AES (AES-128) and each $a, b$ and $c$ are 300 bits integer values. Also Suppose this ...
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KCV and compatibility with block cipher modes of operation

There has been lately a question on KCV (key check value), value provided by many CRYPTOKI (PKCS#11) implementations. I don't particularly like KCV, but I decided to ask about proper use of KCV. ...
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Is the following symmetric design secure?

Assume: $O$ be a reversible random permutation oracle on a finite set and $O^{-1}$ the inverse permutation (pretty much equivalent to a random permutation: What is the difference between a bijective ...
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77 views

Why have 4th and 5th steps in Needham-Schroeder Protocol?

Why have 4th and 5th steps in Needham-Schroeder Protocol? It is said "These steps assure B that the original message it received (step 3) was not a replay.". But what is a replay here? And I don't ...
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78 views

How to store keys for a cascading encryption?

What is the best way to implement a cascade encryption? I'm trying to figure out how to cipher a string (or message) using Serpent-Twofish-AES and then store the keys. I'll provide an explanation, ...
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1answer
152 views

Are there any protocols that are truly secure from active and passive MITM attacks?

Are there are any cryptographic protocols or algorithms that can prevent active MITM attacks or interference when initiating a new connection to a server or someone you have not exchange keys with ...
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1answer
194 views

Serpent cipher : Osvik S-Boxes confusion and test vectors

I'm having hard time with the implementation of the S-Boxes by Osvik found in this paper: Speeding up Serpent. At the end of the paper, all the s-boxes are given and then, I just implement them. ...
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1answer
110 views

Why does Merkle's Puzzle requires Eve quadratic complexity of effort to break the system?

The way Applied cryptography 2ED explains the puzzle is as follows (I paraphrase it): Bob generates 2^20 messages of the form x,y where ...
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1answer
150 views

What's the difference between the long term key and the session keys?

I'm currently studying secret key cryptography, and I've come across the terms "long-term key" and "session key". What's the difference between these two kinds of keys?
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183 views

Open source implementations of Symmetric Searchable Encryption and Order Preserving Encryption

Are there open source implementations of SSE and OPE? Can anyone please point to sample codes, if available. EDIT If cryptDB is not an option, what other options are available? (Indeed, these ...
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135 views

Does MAC provide origin authentication? Why not just use symmetric encryption?

Let's assume Bob and Alice has a secret key for MAC. If MAC is constructed by the key and the message, that means that both Alice and Bob can construct the exact same message and MAC. So, Bob can ...
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1answer
257 views

Serpent block cipher : S0 to S7 functions unclear

I am presently implementing the serpent block cipher in C++ following the specifications. It's important to mention that I'm implementing the cipher in bitslice mode. You'll need the The full ...
2
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1answer
116 views

Can we decrypt in this order when the message is encrypted twice?

If we encrypt a message twice with symmetric key $k_1$ first and then $k_2$ like $E_{k2}\{E_{k1}\{m\}\}$ , ideally we should decrypt with $k_2$ first and then $k_1$ but is it possible to decrypt with ...
2
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234 views

AES file encryption with PBKDF2. Safe parameters?

I'm developing an application that will use public key authentication to contact some webservice. So the user has his keypair on his computer, and I want that file to be encrypted using AES with a key ...
7
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1answer
145 views

Specification of the scream stream cipher is unclear

I am implementing in C++ the Scream stream cipher. The Scream family is composed of Scream-0, Scream-S and Scream-F. For this question, assume that I'm using Scream-S. The specifications of the ...
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154 views

Using multiple secret keys

I have two secret keys. One is a secret key generated by openssl(Primary secret key). Second key is generated by performing one way hash operation to GPS co ordinates and time parameters(Geo secret ...
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Algorithm for sharing secret information with redundant keys [duplicate]

I have an information that I would like to encrypt and give it to someone else. I would like to encrypt it using N separate passwords (say 5) and give each password to some other persons. However the ...
3
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1answer
255 views

Where is the S-Box generated in Rijandel/AES?

It's rather kind of lame questions, and I can't find good and clear explanation: In which step of Rijandel is S-box generated? Is the S-box reused in every round of cipher or is generated in every ...
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3answers
401 views

Using Whirlpool hashing function to encrypt data

I've read that the Whirlpool hash function can produce footprints that could be used as a pseudorandom generator. Is it "OK" to use it to encrypt some data using something like the following? ...