XOR, often written ⊕, is one of the basic operations on bits and bit-sequences. It is a building block of many cryptographic primitives (and some higher-level algorithms, like modes of operations).

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How secure is using a pad (using xor) on a encrypted data, for the purpose of obfuscating/hiding the underlying encryption?

Edit: I know this isn't really a one time pad (as pointed out), though I don't really know what to call it aside from just a pad, I guess. I have been reading around (mostly various stackexchange ...
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AES VS PRNG+HASH+XOR

I was thinking of doing symmetric encryption using just hashing and simple XOR encryption. It would work as: Alice and Bob share a symmetric key Alice manages to send an (authenticated) IV to Bob ...
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Why is XOR preferred over XNOR?

The XOR operator seems to be a frequently used building block inside many cryptographic primitives. As far as I can see, its most desirable properties seem be that for the XOR of two bits $a\oplus ...
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What does it mean when two encrypted files, encrypted with the same method but with different keys, when xor'd together, produce a repeating pattern?

Let's say I have fileA and fileB, both encrypted somehow, but in the same method with different keys. If I xor them together, they will make a repeating pattern of 32 bytes length. What does that ...
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The relationship between the key length and encrypt time in Xor algorithm?

I did work on the encryption algorithm and the decryption using the XOR method noticed that when more the key length, the less time spent on encryption and decryption. I have two questions in ...
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197 views

SHA256-based stream cipher

Can anyone comment if the stream cipher described here is safe? The author claims it to be unbreakable, but does not provide any evidence or proof to support this. For completeness, I have reproduced ...
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Is it possible to deduce the IV from CBC ciphered data, without knowing the key?

The question came up here, which left me thinking: Is it possible to deduce the IV from CBC ciphered data, without knowing the key? And if not, why is it considered a bad idea to create an IV by, for ...
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ASCII to same-length ASCII encryption?

I need to encrypt an ASCII string [a-zA-Z0-9:] to an ASCII [a-zA-Z0-9] string of the same length. It doesn't have to be unbreakable, it's sufficient that it won't be readable at the first sight. The ...
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Why xor is a linear operation but ordinary adding is not

I'm new in cryptography and try to read some articles in this field. Many of these articles talk about non-linear S-boxes, and nothing more on what they mean by their non-linearity. I have a simple ...
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127 views

Significance of repetition in XOR cipher text

I'm attempting to recover plain-text ($P_1, P_2$) from two uneven cipher-text strings ($C_1, C_2$) that I suspect used the same key ($K$). When I XOR $C_1$ and $C_2$ together to obtain ($P_1 + ...
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Block Cipher Mode Amicable to Fast Key Change/Rotation Like XOR?

I'm working with documents encrypted in long term storage. When a client requests the document, the document should be delivered encrypted under a distinct key (distinct from the long term storage ...
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Is a simple stream cipher “partially homomorphic” if no integrity check is applied?

My understanding is that, simply put, a stream cipher is just a CSPRNG such that $R(i,k)$ will produce a deterministic but statistically random sequence, where $i$ is an IV, and $k$ is the session ...
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186 views

XOR cipher Pseudo-random key strength

When implementing a XOR cipher with a pseudo-random key equal in length to the plaintext, Is there a significant difference in potential key strength between keys drawn from a pool of either 1000 or ...
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Applying differential cryptanalysis to ciphers with addition mod $2^{32}$

I am studying differential analysis and have a question. Consider the following simple cipher: $$c_1 = S(m_1 \oplus k_1) \oplus k_2$$ (Plaintext $m_1$ xor with key $K_1$, then result goes into an ...
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187 views

randomly generated key reused with XOR

If I have a long randomly generated key (k), XORed with a message (m), but since the message is longer than the key, there is a chance of reusing the keystream with the same message, but the key is ...
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228 views

XOR secret sharing scheme

I was wondering how we can get a secret sharing of $a+b$ from the sharing of secrets $a$ and $b$ themselves by using an XOR secret sharing scheme, where $a_1,...,a_n$ and $b_1,...,b_n$ are the shares ...
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Encryption algorithms and the “One-Time pad” [duplicate]

I am not well versed in the field but I believe I know the basics. All encryption algorithms that I know of utilize direct data manipulation to encrypt a message (string of bits) such as shifting, ...
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Using Whirlpool hashing function to encrypt data

I've read that the Whirlpool hash function can produce footprints that could be used as a pseudorandom generator. Is it "OK" to use it to encrypt some data using something like the following? ...
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Which encryption method supports random reads?

I have a file containing 16-bit samples and I want to encrypt it, but the problem is that I need to be able to read any random 16-bit value from the file, and be to able to decrypt it, without reading ...
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Feedback requested on a method of posting a message without revealing the author

So I was thinking about variations on the Dining Cryptographers problem - In some cases, it's useful to be able to post a message without revealing the source, but with the additional constraint of ...
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135 views

Hamming Distance vs. Index of Coincidence

When analyzing a repeating-key xor cipher to find the key length, I've read about two key methods (assuming there aren't just repeating chunks of ciphertext for Kasiski's method), for some assumed key ...
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Can OTP still be broken if there are several messages being sent with only a slight variation in a password?

If an attacker were able to get a hold of 2 encrypted messages that were both encrypted in a one time pad with a password that were each similar but had one change in the first character, could it ...
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Is this OTP scheme safe?

I have a message $m_1$ and I want to encrypt it by XORing it with two keys $k_1$ and $k_2$: $$c_1 = m_1 \oplus k_1 \oplus k_2$$ So far so good. Now I was wondering if I could create a "fake" result ...
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Do I need to keep a 64-bit version number secret?

Assume the following structure: version | iv | ciphertext | HMAC(version | iv | ciphertext | ..., key) The version starts out ...
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repeating-key xor and hamming distance

I read that to break repeating-key xor you can do the following: try a keysize $n$ and compute the hamming distance between the first $n$ bits of the encrypted string and the bits $n+1$ to $2n$ of the ...
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one-time pad key related attack [duplicate]

In one-time pads we always say do not use same key twice to encrypt ASCII messages, but if we use a random key to XOR a random ...
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Proof of the standard pseudorandom generator + XOR encryption scheme in Goldreich

Reading Goldreich's Foundations of Cryptography II, I found this proof for the security of the common pseudorandom generator + XOR encryption scheme (Proposition 5.2.12 in the book): Assume you ...
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XOR cipher for encrypting compiled C code

I'm exploring ways of encrypting Intel hex files we send to customers for flashing onto an embedded device. The embedded processor itself has a built-in mechanism that prevents anyone from reading the ...
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Attack XOR encryption of binary data compressed by zlib with known key length (very short key)

I am trying to break a packet format. The packet format simply packs several files into one big file. The file contents are plain. But the index data which contain offsets, file sizes and filenames ...
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513 views

Can we replace the XOR operation in DES with some other operation?

Can we replace the XOR operation in the DES algorithm with some other operation? If so, does it work for both encryption and decryption?
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How to break an arbitrary XOR and Rotation based encryption?

I heard encryption based purely on XOR and Rotation is inherently weak. The paper Rotational Cryptanalysis of ARX says: It is also easy to prove that omitting addition or rotation is devastating, ...
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Secure Hash Function based on AES

How secure would a hash function be which appends an extra block of 16 zeroed out bytes to the end of the message and then AES-encrypts it with a well-known password (say the first 128 bits of pi) ...
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What is the name of this kind of protocol

There is a communication protocol that I believe creates the equivalent of a one time pad, with the downside that the secret message must be transferred multiple times. The protocol is so simple that ...
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Deciphering a key from XOR encrypted cypher using boolean logic

Assume there's an unencrypted message A, and an encrypted message B. You know that message B was encrypted using a simple XOR method of A with a private key K, resulting in message B. Thus, B = A ⊕ K ...
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How can I find two strings $m_1$ and $m_2$, knowing that I know $m_1 \oplus m_2$? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one attack a two-time pad (i.e. one time pad with key reuse)? I recently started to follow the cryptography class of Dan Boneh on coursera.org and the first ...
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Why Addition Mod 32?

I was looking at the algorithm for Twofish, and I noticed that in some places a XOR is used, but in others, they use "addition modulo-32." What makes modulo-32 special? Why not always use XOR? Why not ...
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Can I safely replace XOR with ADD in a stream cipher?

In a stream cipher, the bytes of the plaintext are usually XORed with the keystream to produce the ciphertext. Would there be anything wrong with adding the bytes instead (with overflow), if adding ...
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Is it a good idea to use bitwise XOR on a set of MD5 sums?

I have designed an SQL aggregate function in Oracle that bitwise XORs all MD5 sums of the values stored in a column. For example, if my table is: ...
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Where is the proof of security of Diffie's cipher?

There is an apparently provably secure cipher that was proposed by Diffie, but enhanced by R.A. Rueppel. The scheme, which was mentioned in Applied Cryptography, works like this: Measure the length ...
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A set of key pairs and one hash to secure them

I have a simple problem: I have a set of users' ECDSA key pairs, and say I want to encrypt them with a simple algorithm. I have access to one variable that uniquely identifies the user, so I hash it ...
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Is this “layered” XOR cipher secure?

I am aware of the vulnerabilities of simple xor ciphers and recently I came across a block cipher that claims to solve those vulnerabilities. The cipher goes as follows with both the block and key ...
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With sufficient randomness, is XOR an acceptable mechanism for encrypting?

I have heard criticism of various cryptosystems saying that "at their heart, they were just XOR." Is this just ignorance, or is there something inherently wrong with XOR based ciphers?