XOR, often written ⊕, is one of the basic operations on bits and bit-sequences. It is a building block of many cryptographic primitives (and some higher-level algorithms, like modes of operations).

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Why Addition Mod 32?

I was looking at the algorithm for Twofish, and I noticed that in some places a XOR is used, but in others, they use "addition modulo-32." What makes modulo-32 special? Why not always use XOR? Why not ...
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repeating-key xor and hamming distance

I read that to break repeating-key xor you can do the following: try a keysize $n$ and compute the hamming distance between the first $n$ bits of the encrypted string and the bits $n+1$ to $2n$ of the ...
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With sufficient randomness, is XOR an acceptable mechanism for encrypting?

I have heard criticism of various cryptosystems saying that "at their heart, they were just XOR." Is this just ignorance, or is there something inherently wrong with XOR based ciphers?
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How can I find two strings $m_1$ and $m_2$, knowing that I know $m_1 \oplus m_2$? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one attack a two-time pad (i.e. one time pad with key reuse)? I recently started to follow the cryptography class of Dan Boneh on coursera.org and the first ...
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OTP - Reusing key IS SECURE! PROVED! [duplicate]

EDIT: This is not a duplicate, in this I have explained WHY this should be secure and not if it is secure, so please stop down-vote if you haven't read everything. I have questioned before about my ...
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Hamming Distance vs. Index of Coincidence

When analyzing a repeating-key xor cipher to find the key length, I've read about two key methods (assuming there aren't just repeating chunks of ciphertext for Kasiski's method), for some assumed key ...
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What is the name of this kind of protocol

There is a communication protocol that I believe creates the equivalent of a one time pad, with the downside that the secret message must be transferred multiple times. The protocol is so simple that ...
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Using Whirlpool hashing function to encrypt data

I've read that the Whirlpool hash function can produce footprints that could be used as a pseudorandom generator. Is it "OK" to use it to encrypt some data using something like the following? ...
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Reusing a one-time pad?

I have an embedded device. It produces larges files (200 MB). I want the device to encrypt the file before writing to disk, so I gave them all a 16-byte random key. How can I transform the large ...
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Key length requirement in a simple XOR implementation

I don't have much previous experience at all with cryptography, this is pretty much the first time I've tried anything similar. I'm trying to implement an extremely simple XOR encryption system in ...
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XOR cipher with three different ciphertexts and repeated key, key length known. How do I find the plaintexts?

Let us say we have three different plaintexts (all alphabets, A-Z): $x$, $y$ and $z$, each of length $21$. Let the key, $a$, be also of length $21$. Now, what we have is $x \oplus a$, $y \oplus a$ ...
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BruteForcer XOR (bfxor.exe) to attack 64-bit keys and longer

First of all, this is not a beginner's question since I already know a good deal about encryption and brute-force attacks. This is also no question on how to code programs for brute-force attacks ...