"Zero Knowledge Proof" is an interactive method for one party to prove to another that a statement is true, without revealing anything other than the veracity of the statement.

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What is a Non-Interactive Zero Knowledge Proof?

I understand the concept of a Zero Knowledge Proof thanks to the easy to understand analogy of Alibaba's cave. However, this seems to require interaction between the verifier and the other party. I ...
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Proving knowledge of a preimage of a hash without disclosing it?

We consider a public hash function $H$, assumed collision-resistant and preimage-resistant (for both first and second preimage), similar in construction to SHA-1 or SHA-256. Alice discloses a value ...
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Shadowed identity in cryptography

I was trying to implement zero knowledge protocol for authentication based on the paper "A Practical Zero-Knowledge Protocol Fitted to Security Microprocessor Minimizing Both Transmission and Memory". ...
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318 views

Mutual verification of shared secret

Is it possible to develop a scheme where two parties, unsure if they have the same secret, can verify that the other does or does not share the same secret, without one party being able to cheat and ...
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916 views

Perfect zero knowledge for the Schnorr protocol?

Can somebody explain (or point to a reference) why the Schnorr protocol cannot be proved zero knowledge?
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Zero knowledge proof protocol example?

Alice is color blind. She never knows if her gloves are matched. Her brother Bob always teases her saying her gloves are mismatched and she should go change them. Alice wants to know if ...
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How realistic is a dictionary attack on a secure remote password protocol (SRP) verifier?

I'm deploying a secure remote password protocol implementation and I'm wondering what the consequences are when the client generated verifier gets leaked to an attacker. I've read Thomas Wu's paper ...
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675 views

Can I construct a zero-knowledge proof that I solved a Project Euler problem?

Is there a practical method, and if so what is the method, to reveal that I have the following type of answer but conceal the answer itself? The answer is, let's say, the solution to a Project Euler ...
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330 views

What is the sign bit for in Feige-Fiat-Shamir?

The Feige-Fiat-Shamir identity scheme is based on a ZKP assuming that square roots are "hard" modulo an integer of unknown factorization. The "parallel version" of this protocol includes a "sign bit" ...
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Why Victor must not know which tunnel Peggy chooses?

In the classic description of Zero Knowledge Proof of Knowledge, Victor must wait outside the entrance to the cave while Peggy goes to the fork and choose a side. It's only once Peggy has entered a ...
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362 views

How to forge Schnorr signatures if you can guess the challenge

Underlying the Schnorr signature is an identification protocol: let $G$ be a cyclic group where discrete log is "hard" and choose $g$ as a generator of $G$. Now have Alice pick a random (secret) ...
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488 views

Why does SRP-6a use k = H(N, g) instead of the k = 3 in SRP-6?

I've been reading up on the Secure Remote Pasword protocol (SRP). There are a couple different versions of the protocol (the original published version being designated SRP-3, with two subsequent ...
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How does the simulator of the special-honest verifier zero-knowledge property works?

I’m a bit confused about what the simulator of the special-honest verifier zero-knowledge property of a $\Sigma$-protocol is supposed/allowed to do and how to prove that it is indeed efficient (i.e. ...
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715 views

Proof that lottery does not know outcome of draw

Could a variable participant lottery system cryptographically prove that they have zero knowledge of the outcome of a draw? Participants do not choose numbers in this lottery and winning numbers are ...
6
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383 views

How do zero knowledge protocol with vertex-3-coloring work?

I'm currently not sure if I understood how the zero knowledge protocol with vertex-3-coloring works. I'll describe what I think I've understood and I'll write my questions in bold. ...
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397 views

What is a “rewinding argument”?

I've been reading a bit about cryptographic protocols and I keep seeing the phrase "rewinding argument". I've been unable to find a good source that would explain what is meant by this. It seems like ...
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Zero Knowledge Password Proof

I'm working on implementing a cryptographic system and I'm trying to understand the Zero Knowledge Password Proof concept. So here's some background: To generate a secret key I am: Doing an ECDH ...
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193 views

Why aren't zero-knowledge proofs used for authentication in practice?

I read on Wikipedia that zero-knowledge proofs are not used for authentication in practice. Instead (I think) the server is entrusted with seeing a password in plaintext form, which it should then add ...
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Is there a practical zero-knowledge proof for this special discrete log equation?

We have a multiplicative cyclic group $G$ with generators $g$ and $h$, as in El Gamal. Assume $G$ is a subgroup of $(\mathbb{Z}/n\mathbb{Z})^*$. There are two parties, Alice and Bob: Alice knows: ...
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Proving the possession of signature in zero-knowledge

Does anybody know an efficient mechanism to prove the possession of a digital signature (e.g. RSA) on a certain attribute (message) in zero-knowledge? That is, without revealing the actual signature ...
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When would one prefer a proof of knowledge instead of a zero-knowledge proof?

I've just realized I find it hard to distinguish between these two terms (proof of knowledge, and zero-knowledge proof), specially where only the latter seems to be used in many cryptographic ...
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426 views

Zero knowledge proof of possession of key

Suppose Alice has at some point in time produced ciphertext $C$ from message $M$ with key $k$. Suppose Alice has then passed $C$ to Bob, and also made a commitment to her key $k$ (thanks to ...
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379 views

Is there a public key semantically secure cryptosystem for which one can prove in zero knowledge the equivalence of two plaintexts?

If Alice encrypts two messages $a$ and $b$, such that $x=E(a)$, $y=E(b)$. Can Alice prove (without revealing $a$, $b$ or the private key) that $a = b$? Obviously the proof must not be too long and it ...
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How to prove identity without revealing identity

Let us say Alice publishes a book under the name of Claire. The book becomes wildly popular and now Bob comes along, claiming to be Claire, to reap all the success. How does Alice prove that she wrote ...
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Proof of correct construction of a private key in distributed cryptography

In an exponential ElGamal encryption scheme where the key generation is done in a distributed way among $n$ trustees we have that each trustee $i$ (where $1 \leq i \leq n$): Selects a private key ...
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How to prove membership of a list without disclosing the list members?

I'm designing a messaging system where the sender A sends a message m with a signature s to n Receivers. A Receiver Ri should then be able to prove to a Verifier V that he is one of the receivers of ...
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Usage of Zero-knowledge proofs for NP-complete languages

It is well known that if OWFs/PRGs exist, then there is a zero knowledge proof for any NP-complete language, say G3C (graph coloring in 3 colors). The zero-knowledge notion maintains that any ...
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Can I prove set membership and uniqueness without revealing the element?

Assuming a publicly known set $\Psi$ with $N$ unique elements. I have a set $\Sigma=\{\sigma_1,\sigma_2,...,\sigma_m\}$ where $m\leqslant N$. I would like to publicly prove that all the elements in ...
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Non-interactive proof that an element is in a subgroup

I am just reading the DAA paper (http://eprint.iacr.org/2004/205.pdf, Appendix A). A party $\mathcal{I}$ generates two group elements $g' \in \mathrm{QR}_n$ and $h = g'^r \bmod n$ with $r \in_R \left| ...
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NIZK Proof of knowledge N of M discrete logarithms (threshold)

It is well known how to produce a NIZK that curvepoints $aG$ and $aP$ have the same discrete logarithm $a$ with respect to the curvepoints they are multiplied by. There is also a way to prove that a ...
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169 views

Hamiltonicity proof of knowledge

I'm learning the POK notion and definitions and as a self exercise I wante to prove the statement that the Hamiltonicity protocol is a POK system with knowledge error $1/2$. So the question will be ...
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185 views

Changing SRP-6a message order

In SRP-6a, the public key $B$ of the server is normally sent after receiving the public key of the client $A$. Is it okay to send $B$ and $s$ after the client sends its username $I$, but before the ...
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How to construct a zero-knowledge proof of a number of the form $n=p^a q^b$

Let $n = p^a$$q^b$ where p and q are distinct primes and a and b are positive integers. How to construct a zero knowledge proof that n is of such form? This is actually a homework problem with a ...
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State of the art in zero knowledge proof compilers?

What is the current state of the art zero knowledge proof compiler ? I need one that can minimally handle double exponentiation by a known value E.g. $$Pok\{(\alpha):h=g^{\alpha^b}\} $$ where b, ...
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understanding the proof of knowledge

Recently I've been reading the paper “A New Family of Implicitly Authenticated Diffie-Hellman Protocols”. It's very hard for me to go further. Especially when it comes to the proof of knowledge. ...
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Zero-knowledge proof of a product

I have non-negative integers $x,y,z$. I'm going to give you commitments $C(x),C(y),C(z)$ to them. Then, I would like to prove in zero knowledge that $xy=z$. I can choose the commitment scheme to ...
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Could this be a valid variation of the Schnorr protocol?

The Schnorr protocol is a 3-steps proof of knowledge of a discrete logarithm, whose interactive version works as follows. Let $p$ and $q$ be two public primes, such that $q \mid (p-1)$, and let $G$ ...
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How can two UProve token holders prove to a 3rd party that they aren't the same user?

Suppose I have two users who are issued two different UProve IDs. The Issuer has guaranteed that one UProve token bearer will never have more than one UProve token ID. How can I use UProve to ...
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Zero-knowledge proof for committing a choice?

Let's say there are 100 choices (which are publicly known), each represented as a different string, and today you have to choose one of them. You need not reveal what that choice is right now, though. ...
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Feedback requested on a method of posting a message without revealing the author

So I was thinking about variations on the Dining Cryptographers problem - In some cases, it's useful to be able to post a message without revealing the source, but with the additional constraint of ...
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Question about proof of knowledge defintion?

I am just reading the "soundness"-definition for proofs of knowledge by Bellare / Goldreich. A proof of knowledge is a proof between a prover $P$ and a verifier $V$. $P$ convinces $V$ to know a secret ...
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Zero Knowledge Example using discrete log

I've been exploring Zero Knowledge Proofs and while the classic cave example by Jean-Jacques Quisquater makes sense, I find the discrete log example problematic. Since the Verifier is given p, g and ...
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Is there an oblivious decryption scheme?

Alice has $K$; Bob has $E(K, m)$; Is there such a scheme that enables Alice decrypts $E(K, m)$ without knowing $m$, and Bob gets $m$ ?
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Alice's forgetful banking

Alice has a bank account number, but has forgotten which bank it is for. There are 4 banks, run by Bob, Carlos, David, and Eve. She could find out by going to all of the banks and asking if they have ...
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352 views

Zero-knowledge proof using quadratic residue: why two options?

In the zero knowledge proof using QR, why do we even bother with the server sending us $b = 0$ back? As I understand it, the server selects $b = 0$ or $b = 1$. If $b = 0$, then the client (Alice) ...
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Is it possible to find out whether a number is greater than another number without knowing the numbers?

Is it possible to construct a zero knowledge proof that one encrypted number is larger (or not) than another encrypted number without releasing the values of either numbers?
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How to verify a number encrypted with an unknown key

Alice and Bob are going to follow the protocol below. Are there any crypto-constructions to help Bob verify the correctness of the answer he gets?: Alice encrypts a set of numbers using some ...
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Zero-knowledge proof that a group element is a quadratic residue?

In a paper it says: "To convince a verifier that a group element is a quadratic residue, the prover executes the following proof with the verifier": $PK \left\{ (\alpha) : y = \pm g^\alpha \right\}$ ...
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Zero knowledge-proof for discrete log that is not honest-verifier

Take a cyclic group of prime order. The Schnorr-protocol for proving knowledge of the discrete logarithm of some group element is honest-verifier zero-knowledge, meaning that if the verifier chooses ...
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Explanation of the Fiat-Shamir heuristic

The Wikipedia page on the topic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat%E2%80%93Shamir_heuristic) is completely useless as it only explains what it is and not how it works. I looked at the original paper ...