4
votes
1answer
8k views

How does TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV help?

After reading through https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-tls-downgrade-scsv-0, I could understand that this option is recommened for use when one has legacy SSL Servers which only support SSLv3. ...
4
votes
2answers
230 views

Are there valid attacks on full SHA-1?

Google today announced they are sunsetting SHA-1. Its fine by me. But that made me realize I am not keeping up with the research on SHA-1. The Wikipedia page only says Stevens' attack is the most ...
4
votes
4answers
436 views

Given $n$ bits, how many “truly random” sequences/numbers can be constructed?

Suppose we have $n$ bits, so we can have $2^n$ different bit sequences. Some sequences don't look random, say, all $1$ or $0$. There are also other patterns like $10101010…$, $11001100…$ and such. ...
4
votes
3answers
652 views

Can I create a fixed length output from a fixed length input?

I use AES256 for various purposes in my app. However, the purpose I am now trying to achieve is the following: Input is for example AU00000001 and I would like a ...
4
votes
2answers
447 views

Block Ciphers and (Non-)Generic Attacks

I am currently reading through Cryptography Engineering and came across this definition of block cipher security: Definition 2 An attack on a block cipher is a non-generic method of ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Keeping IV secret for AES CFB mode

I'm developing a security/encryption software and I'm using AES CFB (block size: 16 and key size: 32 bytes). I want to know, if I also keep IV (32 bytes) secret like the key itself (32 bytes), would ...
4
votes
1answer
159 views

Are ideal hashes possible to create?

In a hash function, you map an input of arbitrary length to an output of finite length such that the relationship is one-to-one (or at least that's what you are trying to achieve). Hence, isn't it ...
4
votes
1answer
596 views

Why must curve25519 shared secret be hashed?

When using the curve25519 DH function, D.J. Bernstein recommends hashing the shared secret before using it as a session key for a symmetric block cipher. Why is that? Hashing won't increase the ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

How is the key shared in symmetric key cryptography?

Symmetric key cryptography is an encryption system in which the sender and receiver of a message share a single, common key that is used to encrypt and decrypt the message. Is the key public or it is ...
4
votes
1answer
266 views

Can the AES encryption and decryption algorithms be described as a polynomial for a specific key?

AES is a block cipher that consists of non-linear and linear parts to provide the Shannon requirements of confusion and diffusion respectively. The linear parts can for sure be described as a ...
4
votes
1answer
413 views

Relation between attack and attack model for signatures

I would like to know: What is the relationship between an attack and an attack model. For example, let $\Pi$ be the Lamport signature scheme. This signature has its security based on any one-way ...
4
votes
3answers
532 views

Why are elliptic curves better than cyclic groups?

The set of points of an elliptic curve over a finite field is isomorphic to the direct product of two cyclic groups (i.e. $E(F_{p^n}) \cong Z_{s} \times Z_{t})$. What is the advantage of representing ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Tamper-proofing log files

Problem Overview I want to securely store log files so the contents are secret, and they can't be modified without detection. The files will be encrypted using authenticated encryption (AES in GCM ...
4
votes
2answers
689 views

Signature schemes for underpowered devices (8bit microcontroller)

I am currently researching into a small scale home automation system, aiming for cost. The system architecture is basically one master and several slaves which are connected in parallel. Recently ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

BCrypt vs Key Stretching MD5

Ars technica posted an article about the latest in cyber warfare from the stuxnet crew. They key stretched MD5 by iterating it 10,000 times. It seems to be effective at handicapping HashCat's gpu ...
4
votes
2answers
387 views

How is the x coordinate of a “point at infinity” encoded in a Secp256k1 signature?

I'm testing an implementation of Bitcoin, which uses the curve Secp256k1 for ECDSA, and I want to see how it handles the point at infinity ($0$) if present in a signature. For example, r could be the ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

What happens if an RSA key pair has identical public and private exponents?

Rather, is it possible for big prime numbers? Classroom examples usually involve smaller primes, so for example if you are given a prime number pair $p = 3$, $q = 13$ you would get $n = 39$ and $e = ...
4
votes
1answer
653 views

Blind quantum computing and fully homomorphic encryption

I am somewhat familiar with current research on fully homomorphic enryption schemes and their possible application to Cloud computing. I've just noticed (somewhat late) that a marketing-savvy group ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Cryptanalysis of Linear Feedback Shift Registers

It is well known that simple m-sequence linear feedback shift registers have a linear algebraic structure and therefore the generator seed can easily be deduced using the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm. ...
4
votes
3answers
6k views

RSA Proof of Correctness

Can anyone provide an extended (and well explained) proof of correctness of the RSA Algorithm? And why is it needed? I can't say that this or this helped me much, I'd like a more detailed and newbie ...
4
votes
2answers
366 views

What challenge should I use in a challenge-response proof-of-work?

In order to guard against denial-of-service attacks, I want to require clients to do some work (more work than the server does fulfilling the request) before talking to them. Client connects Server ...
4
votes
2answers
232 views

Is SHA1 secure with such many inputs Z that Z = constant secret X + variable public Y?

Let me ask whether SHA1 is designed to be secure for the following case. You compute each SHA1 of many strings,for example 1 million, where each string is a concatenation of X+Y , where X is secret ...
4
votes
2answers
502 views

X.509 CSR: Why does CA remove signature?

I just read this article on Wikipedia: Certificate Signing Request I'm not a PKI or Crypto expert. As I understand, a CSR (certification request) is always signed by the PKCS#10-Request creator. ...
4
votes
2answers
446 views

Does this block cipher mode allow for decryption?

Is there's a way for someone (with the key) to decrypt a message encrypted with the cipher mode shown? $$ P_0 = IV $$ $$ C_i = P_{i-1} \oplus E_K(P_i) \oplus P_i $$
4
votes
1answer
2k views

RSA: If n=35, show that e will equal d

Show that if $n = 35$ is used as an RSA modulus then the encryption exponent $e$ always equals the decryption exponent $d$? What I have so far: $n = 35$ Therefore $p = 5$ and $q = 7$ or vice versa, ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Are there two-way encryption algorithms that include a work factor?

I recently learned about the hashing algorithm bcrypt, which allows you to specify a "work factor" for the hash which can be incremented to stay ahead of Moore's Law. I understand there are some other ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Decrypting DES with decrypted and encrypted data [duplicate]

I got two 8-byte strings. One which is decrypted is: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF and one which is encrypted is: ...
4
votes
2answers
205 views

Protocol to generate Client Certificates at the start of a SSL session automatically?

A more secure form of 'cookie' could be created for SSL communications through the following method. The client generates and requests the server to sign a certificate. Then the client authenticates ...
4
votes
1answer
324 views

For RSA keys, is the safety of a given key-length different for signing vs encryption?

I'm wondering if considerations of key-length are different when thinking about signing vs encryption. If for some reason, it was safter to use smaller keys for signing that would be interesting.
4
votes
1answer
468 views

Why is it a bad idea to use a UTF-8 derived symmetric key?

Given a cryptographically secure series of octets, it is often useful to display this information or store it in a database in a textual format such as hexadecimal. Why would it be incorrect to take ...
4
votes
1answer
208 views

Modular exponentiation on calculator for textbook RSA

How do you encrypt $51$ with public key $(n,e) = (91,23)$ I understand that $c = 51^{23} \bmod 91$. How can I calculate the result on a calculator?
4
votes
2answers
171 views

How should I generate secure random numbers deterministically?

I have a 256-bit seed; call it P. From P, I need to derive 219 256-bit numbers deterministically. There's a catch, however: I want to derive them in any order. For example, I might need the 7878th ...
4
votes
2answers
114 views

Hash functions vs Stream Ciphers in terms of Speed

We know that it's possible to create a hash using a stream cipher (for instance, RC4 or AES in Counter Mode). As stated here: "A Pseudo Random Generator (PRG) and a hash function are both Pseudo ...
4
votes
2answers
640 views

SHA-256 Reversing A String of Equal Length

I've done a lot of reading on how SHA-256, I've found that SHA-256 is irreversible because more data is fed into the hashed string than the hash string contains. But, what if the data that was ...
4
votes
1answer
256 views

Using a hash (like SHA-256) vs AES as the source for pseudo-random values in Feistel network?

This question is in relation to Wikipedia article on Format Preserving Encryption It says the following It is also possible to make a FPE algorithm using a Feistel network. A Feistel network ...
4
votes
1answer
272 views

Formula for the number of expected collisions

Say we have a hash function that produces $n$ bit outputs. From the birthday problem that after around $\sqrt{2^n}$ different inputs to the has function, we can expect a collision. Say instead that ...
4
votes
2answers
280 views

Why calculate pi to estimate randomness?

Why do testing suites calculate $\pi$ (pi) using the Monte Carlo method to determine if a series of numbers are random? As far as I can tell, the Monte Carlo method can be used to estimate $\pi$ ...
4
votes
2answers
160 views

Randomness re-use in LWE encryption scheme

Let me describe the scheme first, it is the scheme proposed by O. Regev when he introduced the LWE assumption. $sk = \textbf{s} \in \mathbf{Z}_q^n$ $pk = \textbf{A}\textbf{s}+\textbf{e}$ where ...
4
votes
1answer
219 views

Given $g^a, g^b, g^c, g^{1/b}$, is it hard to distinguish $e(g, g)^{abc}$ from a random value?

where $g$ is a group element in bilinear group $\mathbb{G}$. I understand it is very similar to the conventional DBDH problem, but $g^{1/b}$ is also known, possibly making it easier? Does anyone know ...
4
votes
3answers
224 views

Why are we not using multiple ciphers per message?

I am aware of at least rsa, elgamal-encryption, and variations of elliptic-curves relying on different problems and that those problems are considered hard. However, if someone figures out a way to ...
4
votes
2answers
232 views

Spoofing protocol nonce

Amy and Betty have a shared key $k$, and the protocol below is to provide a mutual authentication for both Betty and Amy. A sends B : $n_a$ B sends A : $n_b \;\|\; E(k, n_a)$ A sends B : $E(k, n_b)$ ...
4
votes
1answer
257 views

Solving Vignere Encryption

I'm currently trying to crack a cypher that I believe is Vignere Encrypted and I'm currently stuck. I calculated the key length by finding repeated sequences in the cypher and calculating the the ...
4
votes
1answer
399 views

One time pad: why is it useless in practice?

The symmetric cryptosystem One time pad (OTP) seems to be very beautiful since it is perfectly secret according to Shannon. Many books, however, point out that the main drawback is that one must ...
4
votes
2answers
702 views

Does AES-128 have the same strength as AES-256 with a padded key?

When I use the same 128-bit key for AES-128 and AES-256 with a known/public padding for the latter, is there some weakness in AES-256 that is not present in AES-128 with essentially the same key? ...
4
votes
2answers
525 views

Is Chaocipher a secure cipher under ciphertext-only attack?

Chaocipher was invented by John F. Byrne in 1919. The algorithm was recently revealed – see Moshe Rubin's Chaocipher Revealed, the Algorithm (PDF). While a known plaintext attack successfully finds ...
4
votes
2answers
860 views

How secure is the AES master key if Round Keys are found

If an attacker finds some round key of AES256, is it possible to find the master key? How safe is the master key if an attackers finds multiple round keys?
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does Openssh use only SHA1 for signing and verifying of digital signatures?

I am learning SSH protocol. With my current understanding of SSH protocol, I think that message digest algorithms for using in digital signature should be derived from Key Exchange. But Openssh ...
4
votes
1answer
203 views

Should different key pairs be used for signing and encryption?

In the recent iOS Security white paper from Apple (February 2014), the section on iMessage discusses using two different asymmetric key types as part of its standard operation: When a user turns ...
4
votes
2answers
302 views

Authenticated encryption without padding

I want to encrypt data and protect its integrity and confidentiality. However, I cannot increase the length of the data. Are there any cipher modes of operation which provide confidentiality and ...
4
votes
2answers
236 views

Is the following symmetric design secure?

Assume: $O$ be a reversible random permutation oracle on a finite set and $O^{-1}$ the inverse permutation (pretty much equivalent to a random permutation: What is the difference between a bijective ...

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