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A cryptographic hash function $f : \{0,1\}^{*} \to \{0,1\}^n$ has three properties: (1) preimage resistance, (2) second-preimage resistance, and (3) collision resistance. Even further, these properties form a hierarchy where each property implies the one before it, i.e., a collision-resistant function is also second-preimage resistant, and a second-preimage ...


7

It is neither pre-image resistant, second pre-image resistant nor collision resistant. It is easy to compute square-roots modulo a prime (assuming, of course, a square root exists, it will half the time). If $p = 3 \bmod 4$, then the simple formula $x^{(p+1)/4} \bmod p$ will work; for $p = 1 \bmod 4$, it's a tad more complicated but still sufficiently ...


5

Let me try to elaborate on their proof. Suppose you had a hash function $H$ that was second-preimage resistant but not first-preimage resistant. By showing that this leads to a contradiction, we will be showing that with second-preimage resistance, you must have first-preimage resistance. Namely, we will show that the lack of first-preimage resistance is ...


5

In their paper Second Preimages on $n$-Bit Hash Functions for Much Less than $2^n$ Work, Kelsey and Schneier provide: a second preimage attack on all $n$-bit iterated hash functions with Damgard-Merkle strengthening and $n$-bit intermediate states, allowing a second preimage to be found for a $2^k$-message-block message with about $k\times2^{n/2+1}+ ...


4

Pre-image resistant but not 2nd pre-image resistant? describes the relationship between the three basic hash function security notions: Collision Resistance, Second Preimage Resistance and Preimage Resistance. In short, Collision Resistance implies Second Preimage Resistance (but not vice-versa) - there is a good diagram on page 4 of RogawayShrimpton04 that ...


4

Yes, it has happened. If you look at the SHA3 hash zoo, there are a number of hashes who has the best attack listed as "2nd preimage". One general place this can occur is if you have a hash function with a weak message compression step, but a fairly strong finalization step. Here, we might not be able to generate first preimages (because we don't know what ...


3

Given message $A$, you have to find message $B$, such that the first 64 bits (say, MSB) of their hashes collide: $$ MSB_{64}(H(A)) = MSB_{64}(H(B)) $$ This problem is called Second Preimage Search for the function $MSB_{64}(H)$, or Partial Second Preimage Search for the hash function $H$ alone. When $H$ is the full round SHA-1, there is no result, ...


3

While collision resistance can be defined for normal hash functions like SHA1, for target collision resistance you need a so called keyed hash function, that is a hash function that additionally to a message $m$ also takes a key $k$. The simplest way to construct a keyed hash function out of a regular one is to prepend the key in front of the message: ...



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