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10

In complete honesty: if you have to ask this question, it's overwhelmingly unlikely that you have actually succeeded in breaking the security of AES. At best, you may have discovered a well-known attack against misuse of particular block cipher modes; for instance, plaintext recovery with a chosen-ciphertext attack against ECB, or blind manipulation of the ...


8

It looks like, given your adversary model, things should be secure. HMAC as a randomness extractor has been shown to be good, especially when we can assume the hash function is collision resistant. That paper also has some results which tell how you could guard against the collision resistance being broken (basically use a hash function with larger output ...


6

There is no uniform permutation; there is a permutation uniformly chosen from the set of all possible permutations over $Z_2^{128}$. It is evident that AES is not a uniformly chosen permutation, since its permutation is fixed for any key. One can consider a family $\{AES_K\}$ of AES permutations under all possible keys $K$. Even if the key is chosen ...


4

You basically want a full disk encryption mode for a block cipher; XTS mode seems to be the current standard. In your case each "disk block" is actually a file offset. Note that using a stream cipher or counter mode is NOT secure if the data is ever modified in the file, as it would violate the cardinal sin of using the same key and initialization vector to ...


4

From the sound of your questions, it almost appears that you have some confusion between the CBC-MAC key and the CBC-MAC tag. The CBC-MAC algorithm takes the message (in this case, most likely the ciphertext) and a secret key; it outputs a tag (which can be public). The security property of CBC-MAC is that someone who does not know the key cannot generate ...


4

Assuming you really had broken AES or another frequently used algorithm that is thought to be secure, the first step would be to prove it. Write the code for the attack. Verify that it works on randomly generated data of the kind it requires. If it can break some challenge (e.g. these), do it. Post the results to the challenger or show the results ...


4

It mainly depends on how the algorithm was selected. If it was selected by a public competition like for AES, then it is likely to be secure. If it was forced in by the NSA such as Dual-EC random number generator, then you may have some doubts. Other questions you may want to ask yourself are: Is this an "original" algorithm or was the problem that it ...


3

Other advantages of CTR are: easier to decrypt from a certain offset within the ciphertext no randomness requirements for the nonce nonce can be calculated, e.g. be a simple counter nonce can be a message identifier $E = D$: encryption is the same as decryption, which means only encryption or decryption required from the block cipher less logic ...


3

There seems to be an attack on SSH when using CBC: Plaintext Recovery Attacks Against SSH. I have just scanned the paper and they state, that this will not be possible when CTR mode is used. I don't think that en-/decryption parallelization is need or even utilized in SSH. Update: Link to CERT concerning the topic: Vulnerability Note VU#958563 SSH CBC ...


3

You should never keep keystreams. You should keep a key, and store an IV or Nonce with the ciphertext. You first need to think about where to store the key, if you store it in the same location or with the same security as your ciphertext, your scheme is meaningless. Check this answer I just created on Stackoverflow, and learn about key management. This ...


3

If you can read the intermediate states of the encryption algorithm you could recover, one by one all the round keys. Given a AES round, all the operation between the two AddRoundKey (at the beginning and the ond of the round) are invertible. Take for example round 1: you get the internal state before AddRoundKey (of round 2), you get back at the beginning ...


3

The catch how ever is that if a small part of the file is given along with the location of that bytes from the beginning of the file we should be able to decrypt just that piece. Normal CTR mode encryption allows one to decrypt any block of the file independent of the rest, so no need to invent your own mode. With AES the block size is always 128 bits, ...


2

Assuming for the moment that your claim is correct, I would suggest caution in revealing the details of your findings. After having your results validated by one or two people with the skills to do so (and whom you trust to keep things confidential), then some sort of general announcement (without specifics) would be best, to give people time (say three ...


2

It seems that you are trying to implement your own KBKDF (Key Based Key Derivation Function) using HMAC. Maybe it is better to use a pre-defined one. It would be more sensible maybe to use an HSM that is FIPS certified for NIST SP 800-108. These use one of the KBKDFs defined in NIST SP 800-108. You can still use the idea of the random by putting it in the ...


2

There is book Algebraic Aspects of the Advanced Encryption Standard thats gives a good algebraic description of the AES algorithm. Reading it you'll see that there was some freedom in choosing some parametres to fix a standard. Changing this choices, but keeping the algebric properties should give you an equivalent algorithm. This mainly means you can ...


1

TLDR: Don't invent your own protocol, use an existing one. Reusing an initialization vector with the same key is always a problem, even if the attacker is read-only. For CBC, you can see whether a beginning part of one message is the same as the beginning part of a different message (and you get to know the length of the common prefix, on block-level). ...


1

Wrapping my (now deleted) comments into an answer… OMAC, as described in the OMAC spec and its addendum, is what Rogaway et al provide security proofs for in their EAX paper. If you take a quick look at RFC 4493, you’ll notice that it states: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has recently specified the Cipher-based Message ...


1

If you use the hash as a known key, then you do not need any additional authentication to ensure plaintext integrity. An attacker cannot find another plaintext with that hash value unless the hash is broken. However, there are two problems with that: Like MAC-then-encrypt the hash only ensures authenticity of the plaintext, not of the ciphertext. This ...


1

As additional detail, while the two keys need to be distinct and secret, you can derive the CBC-MAC key and the CBC encryption key from the same master key. Generate a random master key, then use any key derivation algorithm with two different salts to derive the authentication and encryption keys. For example, $K(m, \text{'auth'})$ and $K(m, \text{'enc'})$ ...


1

There are good reasons to think an algorithm being in Suite B is evidence NSA thinks it's secure (they are used to protect classified materials). There are also reasons to think algorithms they recommend for others may not be (it's happened before). So I don't think you can objectively say much about an algorithm either way just on the basis of whether it's ...


1

If the question is "can we define a function that, given $s(a)$ and $s(b)$, gives us the value $s(a \oplus b)$, the answer is, yes, of course we can; the obvious implementation of such a function is: $F(x, y) = s( s^{-1}(x) \oplus s^{-1}(y))$ With this function, if $x=s(a)$ and $y=s(b)$, the $F(x,y) = s(a \oplus b)$ However, the real question you need to ...



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