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6

If you look at the algorithm description, you see that, at a high-level, the encryption algorithm looks like this: addRoundKey(0); for (int i = 1; i < rounds; i ++) { subBytes(); shiftRows(); mixColumns(); addRoundKey(i); } ...


3

The comments on the question are very good. That said, I'll try to address the question(s). What factors should I consider so that it does not become weaker? This is a very important concern that I am glad you have. One of the big strengths that standard ciphers have is that lots of really smart people have looked at them and have not been able to ...


1

If I'm not missing some important point here, that's rather trivial to calculate. As implicitly stated in your question, the attacker has two possible ways to brute-force the encryption key: either by brute-forcing the encryption key itself or by brute-forcing the user-entered password. Given the numbers of iterations of the key derivation function n, the ...


1

There should be no need to reverse engineer AES as its algorithm is already publically available. The algorithm is supposed to be so good that even though its inner workings can be (and indeed are) publically known, it is still extremely difficult to break. I think the difficulty you may be running into is that the round keys are used in reverse order when ...


1

AES is secure in such a way that you cannot find the key even if you know (part of) the plaintext. So it is not possible (feasible) to deduce the key based on the file prefix to decrypt the complete file. I suspect this is the attack that you anticipate. Like woliveirajr said, you can just use the existing filename with a suffix like .enc. What you need to ...


1

If you are encrypting one file to one file, simply save the correct extension. Example: open test.pdf, encrypt the content, and save as test1.pdf, or test1.pdf.enc (so that you know that the file is encrypted and any pdf won't try to open it when you double click). If you are encrypting more than one file together (and, in the end, you have one big chunk of ...



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