Hot answers tagged

6

the key and plaintext is the same. The attacker knows this and the IVs used but doesn't know the plaintext. Is there anything to learn about the plaintext when multiple ciphertexts are available instead of only one? No. Giving the attacker multiple encryptions of a single plaintext using a randomly chosen IV and a fixed key with AES-CBC does not leak ...


2

If you use a random IV each time you encrypt a file, the result will be different. $$\text{AES-CBC}(IV_1, Key, M) = C_1$$ $$\text{AES-CBC}(IV_2, Key, M) = C_2$$ you do not gain any pieces of informations by having $C_1$ and $C_2$. Even knowing that they share the same key and should they share the same length, an attacker can not even know whether or not ...


1

Since this is still open and the issue keeps coming up: TLDR: There are lots of things in OpenSSL that implement standards including AES, but the key derivation part of enc is partly nonstandard First, OpenSSL has several commandline operations it calls commands (although they usually aren't separate programs, as typical commands are on Unix), and a whole ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible