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10

In complete honesty: if you have to ask this question, it's overwhelmingly unlikely that you have actually succeeded in breaking the security of AES. At best, you may have discovered a well-known attack against misuse of particular block cipher modes; for instance, plaintext recovery with a chosen-ciphertext attack against ECB, or blind manipulation of the ...


4

Assuming you really had broken AES or another frequently used algorithm that is thought to be secure, the first step would be to prove it. Write the code for the attack. Verify that it works on randomly generated data of the kind it requires. If it can break some challenge (e.g. these), do it. Post the results to the challenger or show the results ...


2

Assuming for the moment that your claim is correct, I would suggest caution in revealing the details of your findings. After having your results validated by one or two people with the skills to do so (and whom you trust to keep things confidential), then some sort of general announcement (without specifics) would be best, to give people time (say three ...


1

TLDR: Don't invent your own protocol, use an existing one. Reusing an initialization vector with the same key is always a problem, even if the attacker is read-only. For CBC, you can see whether a beginning part of one message is the same as the beginning part of a different message (and you get to know the length of the common prefix, on block-level). ...


1

Wrapping my (now deleted) comments into an answer… OMAC, as described in the OMAC spec and its addendum, is what Rogaway et al provide security proofs for in their EAX paper. If you take a quick look at RFC 4493, you’ll notice that it states: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has recently specified the Cipher-based Message ...



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