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I would think these numbers would have been put on the google search engine, and yield (probably) many hits. This assumption is wrong. Certificate serial numbers are not indexed by common search engines, nor are they typically posted to any HTML site. Frankly, I'm not sure why you would assume they'd be indexed. The Wordpress certificate is used for ...


3

Anon2000 - as currently constructed your mode is fatally flawed. Given two known messages encrypted with the same key (i.e. where the attacker knows the plaintexts) that are each at least two blocks in length (not counting the IV or final validation block), the attacker can trivially forge at least two other 'valid' messages (and many more than that if the ...


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FFX is not malleable. It's a strong tweakable pseudo-random permutation, where the "strong" here indicates that both encryption and decryption look like random permutations from the attacker's perspective. In particular, there's no relationship between the plaintexts of closely related ciphertexts (aside from the trivial observation that different ...


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This does not meaningfully authenticate the ciphertext. Your encryption is the same as OFB, meaning no block depends on the previous plaintext; for instance, $$C_2=P_2\oplus E(P_1\oplus (P_1\oplus E(IV\oplus 0)))=P_2\oplus E(E(IV)).$$ That means confidentiality should be fine; however, it provides no authentication except of the length of the message.


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Consider what would happen if an attacker altered one of the ciphertext blocks, but kept the IV and all previous ciphertext blocks identical. i.e. Xor some difference $\Delta$ to ciphertext block $C_x$, so that the altered block $C''_x = C_x \oplus \Delta$. This will produce an altered corresponding Plaintext block, like so: $$P''_x = C''_x \oplus ...


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First, some notes on your choices of primitives: AES-256: You don't need to use AES-256 unless the data you want to protect needs to remain confidential for more than 30 years SHA-256 for authentication. Don't use plain SHA-256. Either use HMAC-SHA-256 using an encrypt-then-authenticate approach or (even better!) use AES-GCM or AES-EAX as your mode of ...



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