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This is vulnerable to a length extension attack. Given a valid nonce/MAC, the nonce can be extended to forge a new valid nonce/MAC value. This is because $m_4$ is appended to the end inside the outer hash. How this affects you will depend on how you validate your nonce. But in general, this is not a secure construction. There's probably more things wrong ...


3

The motivation, to me, is that in reality you can consider any router on the internet to be successfully executing an "intruder-in-the-middle" attack just by forwarding messages unchanged. After a successful execution of the identification scheme, Bob knows that someone on the channel is Alice, which is all the protocol was hoping to achieve. It was ...


2

The algorithm produces a password based on the value of the time that is input as an argument. That value does not have to be the current time. For the purposes for which TOTPs are generally used, there is no value in producing the password for a time other than the current time step - it won't be recognized by the validator.


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If your environment was fully compromised you could at no point actually decrypt your data, defeating the purpose. So I’m going to assume the user only uses an authentic client and the client’s memory is protected during execution. Generate a private/public keypair. Store the public key on the server, encrypt the private key with the user’s passphrase and ...


1

Public-key cryptography is not sufficiently computationally burdensome to where other approaches must be used for authentication protocols. Note though that what you describe is not actually public-key based. The verification of the MAC requires Dave and Bob to both have a shared key. Also, note that a random component must be included in some manner in all ...



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