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BCrypt is considered more secure The theoretical security of bcrypt has received less scrutiny than that of PBKDF2, SHA2 and HMAC. PBKDF2 is thus widely standardised (e.g. in NIST SP800-132 and PKCS #5) while bcrypt is not. In practice the security (resistance to brute force attack or dictionary attack) of bcrypt and PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA512 can be ...


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Probably because a simple cascade would only be stronger against some attacks, while opening the door to more implementation bugs. While bcrypt and scrypt are (password based) key-derivation functions, much of what is in the answers to this question about combining hash functions applies here. Different constructions give preimage resistance and PRF-ness, ...


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I'm not sure about your specific system; this only addresses "can a key derived from the password make a good shared secret?" The most common password hashing functions are actually designed for exactly this purpose -- deriving a cryptographic key from a (weak) password. That's actually what PBKDF2 stands for: "password-based key derivation function #2" ...


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In both options, if the adversary has a way to check either AES key, then a brute password guessing attack can be attempted, and BCrypt is the main line of defense against that. For constant effort, option 2 force to halve the cost parameter in BCrypt, and is thus twice more vulnerable to password guessing than option 1 is. BCrypt's output is described as ...



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