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10

In complete honesty: if you have to ask this question, it's overwhelmingly unlikely that you have actually succeeded in breaking the security of AES. At best, you may have discovered a well-known attack against misuse of particular block cipher modes; for instance, plaintext recovery with a chosen-ciphertext attack against ECB, or blind manipulation of the ...


6

The point of the IV is to prevent the same (key,IV) from ever being used for two different messages in practice. This is an absolute requirement for stream ciphers or block cipher modes such as CTR that are effectively stream ciphers, because re-using the same (key,IV) pair lets an eavesdropper trivially obtain the XOR of two plaintext messages, which means ...


5

Assuming you really had broken AES or another frequently used algorithm that is thought to be secure, the first step would be to prove it. Write the code for the attack. Verify that it works on randomly generated data of the kind it requires. If it can break some challenge (e.g. these), do it. Post the results to the challenger or show the results ...


4

That definition is a standard definition which defines encryption as a function $E$. That function takes two inputs, a $\kappa$ bit key and a $n$ bit message. Hence it is defined over the cartesian product - denoted as $\times$ - over these two sets, i.e. all bitstring of length $\kappa$ and $n$ respectively. It maps - denoted as $\rightarrow$ - to an $n$ ...


4

Encrypting big amounts of data is no problem for block cipher - if you remember a few important things. You can't encrypt plaintext which is bigger than the block size. You need to do some addition work. Most cipher operation modes first divide the plaintext into blocks of the size of the cipher. Now you can do different things: How about just encrypting ...


3

The first application is for decryption on a multicore processor. I assume any of ECB, CBC, CFB or CTR would be suitable since decryption would be faster when performed in parallel, but are any of them significantly more suitable than the others and how? CTR, CBC and CFB all allow parallel decryption. CTR allows you to decrypt any ciphertext block ...


3

Every paragraph ends with : "this operation is invertible", I suppose the whole salsa20 algorithm is. The Salsa20 quarterround, and thus rowround, columnround and doubleround are invertible. However, the whole Salsa20 core is not because the initial state is added to the state after iterating the rounds (cf. page 6 in the spec). If I use salsa20 ...


2

There is book Algebraic Aspects of the Advanced Encryption Standard thats gives a good algebraic description of the AES algorithm. Reading it you'll see that there was some freedom in choosing some parametres to fix a standard. Changing this choices, but keeping the algebric properties should give you an equivalent algorithm. This mainly means you can ...


2

Yes, it is possible to implement the primitive asked, with a 32-bit block cipher that is secure (indistinguishable from a random permutation) no matter how many input-output pairs are known, keyed with a fixed secret randomly-chosen key. That's a standard building block in Format Preserving Encryption. One such block cipher is: Louis Granboulan and Thomas ...


2

How does Salsa20 work? The basic building block of salsa20 is a fixed 512 bit permutation. This is similar to a block cipher with a fixed and publicly know key (or a zero bit key if you prefer). Since it has no key input, you can't use it with block cipher modes of operation. The next step in Salsa20 is a feed-forward by adding the input into the output, ...


2

Assuming for the moment that your claim is correct, I would suggest caution in revealing the details of your findings. After having your results validated by one or two people with the skills to do so (and whom you trust to keep things confidential), then some sort of general announcement (without specifics) would be best, to give people time (say three ...


1

Counter mode is the only mode that fits both your use scenarios. OFB and CTR are the 2 standard modes that convert the block cipher into a stream cipher, allowing precomputation of the key stream before plaintext or ciphertext is available, as well as allowing encryption without padding. CTR is the only one of these supporting parallel processing for both ...


1

With byte aligned data, bit padding allows the padding oracle attack. Every message has to end in a 0x80 byte followed by any number of zero bytes. You can iterate one byte at a time just like with many other byte paddings. If you allowed plaintexts that are not a full number of bytes long, the attack wouldn't be possible. (Every plaintext that didn't end ...


1

The key schedule uses constants that differ between the key sizes. For arbitrary sized keys you would have to define an algorithm for deriving them. Each key size also uses a different number of rounds, for which you would have to do the same. Also, what's the point? 256-bit keys are enough for all eternity. Using a longer keylength variant would likely ...


1

Some cryptographers feel that the ultimate goal for an encryption scheme is semantic security or, even better, perfect security. An encryption scheme that supports de-duplication also allows the backup server -- and the attacker, who we assume steals every backup tape that the server sysadmins send to the off-site backup location -- to detect which parts ...


1

I read about the AEZ encryption scheme as presented at the CAESAR competition. To me it seems like a construction of an arbitrary length block cipher from a smaller one. The construction is only used in the v1.x of AEZ, because it requires appriximately 1.8 AES calls per block of plaintext, while the one used in v2.0 requires only 1 AES per block ...



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