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As Gerald Davis explained in the other answer, there are about 6 million possible passwords, which is way too few. However, there's an additional weakness: since the password and salt are combined with XOR rather than concatenation, it is sufficient to generate a table for all hash values. If you know the $x$ for which $H(x) = h$, you know that the password ...


4

Possible password search space = $36^5$ = 6.05 million possible combinations or ~$2^{26}$. If the passwords were randomly generated it would be 26 bits of entropy which isn't just weak it is pointless. To put that into perspective the throughput on modern GPUs is on the order 1 billion SHA-256 hashes per second. So the exhaustive search time to break an ...


1

2 candidates are enough that you can (with high probability) uniquely identify the correct secret. An attacker would still have to enumerate all $2^{56}$ possible values for the secret -- or, on average, about $2^{55}$ values -- to find the right one. But if the attacker has 2 candidates, then this is enough information that the attacker can recognize when ...


2

If you have two prefixes, say $p_1$ and $p_2$ assuming a well designed hash function, this will give you two lists of possible candidates $L_1,L_2$ each of size roughly $2^{24}.$ The correct value is in both of these lists. It is unlikely to also have spurious candidates since assuming uniformity o relevant variables and fixing, say the list $L_1$, the ...



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