Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

In the first block, the IV provides the "randomness", and in subsequent blocks you just use the previous block of ciphertext instead. Based on the assumption, that the cipher is not weak and behaves like a pseudorandom permutation, this is basically the same: You XOR something unpredictable on the plaintext, and then encrypt. As long as the IV is chosen ...


3

As long as the IV is chosen correctly, every individual block of the encrypted output will be uniformly random over the set of all bit-patterns of the given size. Each block is independent from the clear text, but they are not independent from each other. The first block contains the IV itself, which by construction is uniformly random and independent from ...


2

Yes there is a significant difference concerning brute-force. ECB suffers from multi target attacks whenever you encrypt the same message block. This is always possible in a chosen-plaintext attack and often possible in practice with a known-plaintext attack. With CBC the IV means that the plaintexts passed to the blockcipher are almost certainly unique ...


2

As Maarten Bodewes already wrote in a comment, if you ignore the computational overhead of XOR, then there is essentially no difference in CBC and ECB for a bruteforce attack. However, the question is actually mixing oranges and apples (and it is not obvious), because the security weakness of modes of operation has nothing to do with the underlying ...


1

This is why we use random initialization vectors (IVs) for all such algorithms.


1

Take a look at this article it explains the IV can be publicly known once you have encrypted your data. Is using (and storing) a different iv for each file sufficient? (Am I correct in thinking that I'd need to store the iv with the encrypted data?) Yes, as a matter of fact i would not recommend using an IV twice, just for safety. Is this safe? ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible