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Yes, we always have to pad the message. The reason is simple: How do we know if the message has a padding or not if we don't always pad? Let's say we pad with adding only $0$ bits. We got the (after padding) message $0101\,1100\,0000\,0000$ and a block size of 2 bytes (16 bits). Well, what was the original message? Was it $0101\,11$? Or was it $0101\,1100$? ...


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SSL padding always pads, using 1..blocksize bytes (8 bytes for triple DES, 16 for AES). This padding makes it deterministic independently of the value of the plaintext. It's a padding mode similar to ISO 10126 (only the last padding byte is one less). Other padding values - such as the zero padding performed by PHP's mcrypt library - are also ...


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Yes there is a significant difference concerning brute-force. ECB suffers from multi target attacks whenever you encrypt the same message block. This is always possible in a chosen-plaintext attack and often possible in practice with a known-plaintext attack. With CBC the IV means that the plaintexts passed to the blockcipher are almost certainly unique ...


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As Maarten Bodewes already wrote in a comment, if you ignore the computational overhead of XOR, then there is essentially no difference in CBC and ECB for a bruteforce attack. However, the question is actually mixing oranges and apples (and it is not obvious), because the security weakness of modes of operation has nothing to do with the underlying ...


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If I understand you correctly, you want to use the decryption process of CBC to encrypt, i.e., This would not be CPA secure. The problem is, as you already noted, that the IV has no influence on any block but the first one. I.e. a CPA attacker works as follows: Choose two random messages of length 2 blocks $(m_0^0,m_0^1)$ and $(m_1^0,m_1^1)$ and output ...


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For CBC mode, the IV can be generated in any manner where it would be unpredictable to an attacker from one message to the next. In practice that means a random number generator of some kind. Since the block size is 128-bits, the probability of IV repeat before the key expiration is negligible. The CBC IV is visible to an attacker viewing your ciphertext; as ...


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To show that a family of functions is not a PRP, you have to either show that the functions are not permutations or that they do not behave pseudo-randomly. As it is already established that the functions are in fact permutation you need to show the latter. For a family of permutations to be a PRP means that it is computationally infeasible to distinguish a ...



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