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6

Even after your updates, the first part seems unnecessary. However, steps 4-5 do indeed prevent the attacker from learning future nonces they could ask the key MAC values for. So the protocol steps 4-7 would be secure with a secure MAC. I agree with CodesInChaos that using HMAC would be better, because H(m||k) has some weaknesses, while HMAC is standard. ...


2

Designing such a challenge is Impossible. If we assume that having a connection is equal to being able to exchange any piece of knowledge at any given time then the proof of impossibility of such challenge is as follows: Proof. First assume that there is such a challenge and Alice is capable of querying such a challenge to correctly determine whether the ...


2

Yes! Here is one such scheme. Let $s=\mathcal S(x)$ be what that the question's tiny device produces for 64-bit input $x$, and $\mathcal V(s,x)$ the public verification function for that, which outputs $1$ if $s$ matches $x$, $0$ otherwise. I'll assume this resists existential forgery under adaptive chosen message attack, and we want to extend it to ...


1

Neither scheme, as described, is secure against man-in-the-middle attacks. In particular, an attacker who wants to impersonate the client can simply relay the server's challenge to the real client, pretending to be the server, and then relay the real client's reply to the server. After that, they're free to keep pretending to be the client. However, ...


1

As long as properly implemented using secure algorithms, there is no real security difference. In both cases the protocol is secure as long as the underlying signature or encryption algorithm is. However, one difference is the random number used: In scheme A the numbers must be unique. If the server ever reuses a number, then an adversary could replay a ...



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