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5

Yes, there are several ways in which Mallory could pretend to be Amy. One obvious way, which doesn't even involve Amy herself in any way, would be for Mallory to perform steps 1 and 2 of the protocol normally, as if he were Amy. Then, given Betty's nonce $n_b$, Mallory can start a second, parallel instance of the protocol, again pretending to be Amy, and ...


3

This is vulnerable to a length extension attack. Given a valid nonce/MAC, the nonce can be extended to forge a new valid nonce/MAC value. This is because $m_4$ is appended to the end inside the outer hash. How this affects you will depend on how you validate your nonce. But in general, this is not a secure construction. There's probably more things wrong ...


3

Yes, because Mallory can use Amy and Betty to get any encrypted nonce; Amy and Betty are oracles for Mallory. She just has to send the nonce she has to encrypt to either one of them and they perform the task for her (in another "authentication attempt", using step 1 & 2). Usually you protect against this kind of situation by performing an encryption ...


2

Designing such a challenge is Impossible. If we assume that having a connection is equal to being able to exchange any piece of knowledge at any given time then the proof of impossibility of such challenge is as follows: Proof. First assume that there is such a challenge and Alice is capable of querying such a challenge to correctly determine whether the ...


1

In real communications, you often don't reliably know each others' public keys. X.509 certificates provide a way to verify a public key (as the certificate is signed by another key, and that key can be in a certificate signed by a third key, and so on, until we reach a public key that the other person does trust). Certificates are unnecessary when both ...



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