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2

A cryptosystem is not "based on an assumption" ; it is based on some mathematical structure (e.g. prime order elliptic curves, or prime order fields). Informally, a cryptosystem is said IND-CCA secure (which means: it satisfies the indistinguishability security notion, against adversaries which are given access to a decryption oracle) under some assumption A ...


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If attackers can strip off RSA / EC / -DSA digital signature and conduct CCA on AES-CTR or CBC payload, why can't they do the same for AES-GCM? The scenario, you're talking about is iMessage or Signal Protocol or other protocols which allow optionally to sign the ciphertext and thereby don't MAC it. The problem here is a) that you could replace the ...


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The problem with non-authenticated symmetric cipher modes is that they are PRP's. That means that - no matter what you do to the ciphertext - you'll get a valid and unique plaintext (not considering unpadding). This means that an attacker can change (part of) the outcome of decryption by altering the ciphertext. It can also lead to information leakage, e.g. ...


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Your questions can be split in two: What is the meaning of IND-CCA secure? What have an adversary access in a challenger-adversary game? This basically means that the scheme achieves the indistinguishability notion, even if an attacker has access to a decryption oracle. See Easy explanation of "IND-" security notions? for more detail on ...


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Ok, suppose that we have a ciphertext $(c_1, c_2, ..., c_8)$ that we wish to decrypt. What we start off with is to make a guess for $p_8$, which is the decryption of the last byte of the block. Suppose that we guess that it is 0x07; we then need to validate that guess. What we do is create a two block message; the second block is the challenge ciphertext ...



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