Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Let's try to simplify and abstract your protocol a bit. Instead of your server and client, we just have two parties, let's call them Sally and Charlie. Charlie has a key pair $K = (K_i, K_u)$ for a suitable asymmetric cryptosystem $\mathcal E$. We assume that this cryptosystem is partially homomorphic, such that $\mathcal E_K(a) \otimes \mathcal E_K(b) = ...


2

Essentially any IND-CPA-secure lattice-based cryptosystem offers additive homomorphism, up to a predetermined number of operations. I don't know of any IND-CCA1-secure post-quantum candidate that offers any homomorphic property, except Loftus-May-Smart-Vercauteren SAC'11, which is based on a nonstandard "knowledge of error" lattice assumption.


1

There should be plenty of them. Off the top of my head, I'm thinking of the provable secure version of NTRU by Stehlé and Steinfeld [1], which is IND-CPA secure. In this scheme, ciphertexts are of the form: \begin{equation} c = pk \cdot s + p\cdot e + \operatorname{encode}(m) \end{equation} where $s$ and $e$ are random polynomials, $p$ is a small prime, ...


1

If I understand the question correctly, you are asking whether it's really needed to have the KEM be CCA secure, and maybe in the random oracle model it would suffice for it to just be an invertible one-way function. This would not be CCA2-secure. Specifically, let $f$ be any invertible one-way function, and construct $f'$ so that $f'(x)=0f(x)$ for every ...


1

It can be proved, mathematically, that your (2), (3), and (4) are all equivalent under chosen plaintext attack. That is, if you can do any of those things then you can also do the other two! It should be obvious that (2) implies both (3) and (4): if you can decrypt a message then you know which message it is, and also you know it's not random noise. The ...


8

This isn't really a "hard" answer, but an attempt to give some intuition or motivation. One can interpret indistinguishability as an overapproximation of the most common notions of security: Any system that is broken in a more practical way will also fail to meet indistinguishability, that is, all practically important security requirements are in fact ...


5

Katz & Lindell mention in their book "Introduction to Modern Cryptography: Principles and Protocols" an example of an IND-CPA attack from World War II. Navy cryptanalysts suspected that Japanese ciphertexts containing the fragment "AF" where referring to the Midway island. Then, they told officials at Midway to send unencrypted messages reporting they ...



Top 50 recent answers are included