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The idea behind these models is to model an adversaries capabilities. To get reliable security the worst case for a capability is modelled. Let's start with chosen plaintext attacks (CPA): In this game the adversary is given access to an encryption oracle. This models the case where an attacker knows (parts of) the message. For example, the British knew ...


2

"What prevents an attacker from just sending the received ciphertext to the recipient who will think that this is the legitimate message?" Nothing. $\:$ (In that case, the recipient will be correct.) Why "in the definition" is the attacker "only allowed to send another" message? If he knows before seeing the ciphertext that it will be an encryption of ...


1

The answer is that it depends very much exactly on what you are considering. However, better bounds can be achieved by using a 96 bit nonce and a 32 bit counter. This is certainly true for GCM as was proved in this paper (Breaking and Repairing GCM Security Proofs). Note that GCM uses CTR inside, so this is relevant.


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I don't understand the difference between the split nonce/counter design and simply using a random value and incrementing. Why is using nonce +/⊕ counter insecure whereas nonce || counter is secure? Here's the context of your Wikipedia quote (my bold): If the IV/nonce is random, then they can be combined together with the counter using any lossless ...


4

Suppose you do CTR mode as: $E(k,nonce+1) \oplus m_1$, $E(k,nonce+2) \oplus m_2$, $E(k,nonce+3) \oplus m_3$, etc. The wikipedia page is talking about a non-random nonce, with a specific example of a packet counter. So suppose $nonce$ is a packet counter and in each packet you encrypt several blocks. You might end up with the following: In packet #$p$: ...


4

The property you are probably looking for is whether the MACs are PRF. With HMAC it depends on the pseudo-randomness of the hash function used. If the hash is a PRF then the HMAC is as well. However, that is not required for MAC security of HMAC, so it's not necessarily true even with a secure HMAC. See New Proofs for NMAC and HMAC: Security without ...



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